Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MARIAN QUOTES, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on CHARITY, QUOTES on FAITH, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on the CHURCH, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May – St Eugene de Mazenod

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May – Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Easter, C and The Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod OMI (1782-1861)

“I wish I could pass my life
at the foot of the Holy Tabernacles
in which our adorable Saviour dwells.”i wish I couldpass my life at the foot of the holy tabernacles - st eugene de mazenod 21 may 2019.jpg

“To love the Church
is to love Jesus Christ
and vice versa.”to-love-the-church-is-to-love-jesus-christ-st-eugene-de-mazenod-21-may-2018

“What more glorious occupation than to act
in everything and for everything only for God,
to love Him above all else,
to love Him all the more,
as one who has loved Him too late.”what-more-glorious-occupation-st-eugene-de-mazenod-21 may 2017

“Practice well among yourselves:
charity, charity, charity
and outside,
zeal for the salvation of souls”practice-well-among-yourselves-charity-st-eugene-de-mazenod-21-may-2018

“We glorify God in the masterpiece
of His power and love…
it is the Son whom we honour
in the person of His Mother.”

St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)we-glorify-god-in-the-masterpiece-st-eugene-de-mazenod-21-may-2018

Posted in CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN TITLES, MARY, MATER ECCLESIAE, PAPAL DECREE, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May 2018 “Mary’s Month!” – The First Memorial of Mary, Mother of the Church and the Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May 2018 “Mary’s Month!” – The First Memorial of Mary, Mother of the Church and the Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)

“…She is clearly the Mother
of his members;
that is, of ourselves,
because she cooperated
by her charity,
so that faithful Christians,
members of the Head,
might be born in the Church.
As for the body,
she is the Mother of its Head…
Mary gave birth to our Head;
the Church gave birth to you.
Indeed, the Church also,
is both virgin and mother,
mother, because of her
womb of charity,
virgin, because of the integrity
of her faith and piety.”

St Augustine (354-430) Doctor of Graceshe is clearly the mother of His members - st augustine - first memorial of mother of the church - 21 may 2018

“This celebration will help us to remember.
that growth in the Christian life,
must be anchored to the Mystery of the Cross,
to the oblation of Christ in the Eucharistic Banquet
and to the Mother of the Redeemer
and Mother of the Redeemed,
the Virgin who makes her offering to God.”this celebration will help us to remember - card sarah for pope francis - 21 may 2018

“As a caring guide to the emerging Church,
Mary had already begun her mission
in the Upper Room, praying with the Apostles,
while awaiting the coming of the Holy Spirit.”

Cardinal Robert Sarah

Congregation of Divine Worship
and the Discipline of the Sacraments,
11 February 2018, the memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lourdes.
DECREE ON THE CELEBRATION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY,
MOTHER OF THE CHURCHIN THE GENERAL ROMAN CALENDARas a caring guide to the emerging church - cardinal sarah - 21 may 2018

“We glorify God in the masterpiece
of His power and love…
it is the Son whom we honour
in the person of His Mother.”we glorify god in the masterpiece - st eugene de mazenod - 21 may 2018

“To love the Church
is to love Jesus Christ
and vice versa.”to love the church is to love jesus christ - st eugene de mazenod - 21 may 2018

“Practice well among yourselves:
charity, charity, charity
and outside,
zeal for the salvation of souls”

St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)practice well among yourselves charity - st eugene de mazenod - 21 may 2018

Posted in QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 21 May – St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I. (1782-1861)

Saint of the Day – 21 May – St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I. (1782-1861) Priest, Bishop, Founder of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Evangeliser, Missionary Preacher, Apostle of the poor and marginalised – born Charles-Joseph-Eugène de Mazenod on 1 August 1782 at Aix-en-Provence, southern France and died on 21 May 1861 at Marseille, France of cancer.   When his body was exhumed in 1936 it was found to be incorrupt.   Patronages – refugees, missionaries, families.header 2 st eugeneheader - st eugene de_Mazenod

Eugene de Mazenod was born into an aristocratic family, on 1 August 1782 and baptised the following day in the Église de la Madeleine in Aix-en-Provence.   His father, Charles Antoine de Mazenod, was one of the Presidents of the Court of Finances and his mother was Marie Rose Joannis.   Eugene began his schooling at the College Bourbon but this was interrupted by the events of the French Revolution.   With the approach of the French revolutionary forces, the family was forced to flee to Italy.

st eugene aged 5
St Eugene aged 5

He became a boarder at the College of Nobles in Turin but a move to Venice meant the end to formal schooling.   With their money running out, Eugene’s father was forced to seek various employments, none of which were successful.   His mother and sister returned to France – eventually seeking a divorce so as to be able to regain their property that had been seized.   Eugene was fortunate to be welcomed by the Zinelli family in Venice.   This is how it happened:

One day when Eugene was playing at the window of his house, Fr Bartolo Zinelli (1766-1803) appeared on the other side of the street and asked him, “Are you not afraid of wasting your time?” “Alas, responded Eugene, it is really awful, but what can I do?   I am a foreigner here without any books available to me.”  “Well, then”, replied Don Bartolo, “I am right in my library at the moment and here I have many books in Latin, Italian and French.”   Having said this, he took up the stick that was used to bar the shutters and put a book on it and passed it over the narrow, approximately one and one half meter street.

After having read the book, Eugene, following the advice of his father, went to Don Bartolo’s house to thank him for this kind gesture.  “Well,” said Don Bartolo, “do you see this lovely library?   All of these books are available to you as well.”   Then, Don Bartolo showed Eugene his study where he and his brother Don Pietro used to study and told him, “You can take the place here of my younger brother who has died.”   Eugene could not contain his joy.   “Well, then, you can begin tomorrow already.”

Fr Bartolo Zinelli  took special care of Eugene and saw to his education in the well-provided family library where the young adolescent spent many hours each day and was a major influence in the human, academic and spiritual development of Eugene.

Once again the French army chased the émigrés from Venice, forcing Eugene and his father and two uncles to seek refuge in Naples for less than a year and, finally, to flee to Palermo in Sicily.   Here Eugene was invited to become part of the household of the Duke and Duchess of Cannizaro as a companion to their two sons.   Being part of the high society of Sicily became the opportunity for Eugene to rediscover his noble origins and to live a lavish style of life.   He took to himself the title of ‘Comte’ (“Count”) de Mazenod, did all the courtly things and dreamed of a bright future.st eugene - in profile - young

Spiritual journey of conversion
At the age of twenty, Eugene returned to France and lived with his mother in Aix en Provence.   Initially he enjoyed all the pleasures of Aix as a rich young nobleman, intent on the pursuit of pleasure and money – and a rich girl who would bring a good dowry. Gradually he became aware of how empty his life was and began to search for meaning in more regular church involvement, reading and personal study and charitable work among prisoners.   His journey came to a climax on Good Friday, 1807 when he was 25 years old.   Looking at the sight of the Cross, he had a religious experience.   The sight of the oblation of Jesus on the Cross, with his arms outstretched in love, led Eugene to respond in love:  “What more glorious occupation than to act in everything and for everything only for God, to love Him above all else, to love Him all the more as one who has loved Him too late.”st eugene - youngerst eugene youngSt-Eugene-de-Mazenod-postulation-lgst eugene - wonderful

Priest
In 1808, he expressed his desire for dedication to Jesus the Saviour by beginning his studies for the priesthood at the Saint-Sulpice Seminary in Paris and was ordained a priest at Amiens (Picardy), on 21 December 1811.    Since Napoleon had expelled the Sulpician priest from the seminary, Eugene stayed on as a formator for a semester.   As a member of the Seminary, notwithstanding personal risk, Eugene committed himself to serve and assist Pope Pius VII, who at this time was a prisoner of emperor Napoleon I at Fontainebleau.   In this way, he experienced at firsthand, the suffering of the post-Revolutionary Church.

On his return to Aix, Father de Mazenod asked not to be assigned to a parish but to dedicate himself fully to evangelising those who were not being touched by the structures of the local church:  the poor who spoke only the Provençal language, prisoners, youth, the inhabitants of poor villages who were ignorant of their faith.   His constant message was, to invite people to enter into the same experience of Jesus, that he had at his conversion.   Looking at everyone and every situation through the eyes of the Saviour, he showed the poor the human and spiritual dignity that was theirs and taught them how to live in relationship with the Saviour.   The goal of his priestly preaching and ministry was always to lead others to develop themselves fully as humans, then as Christians and finally to become saints.st eugene - med

Oblates of Mary Immaculate
On 25 January 1816, “impelled by a strong impulse from outside of himself” he invited other priests to join him in his life of total oblation to God and to the most abandoned of Provence.   Initially called “Missionaries of Provence,” they dedicated themselves to evangelization through preaching parish missions in the poor villages, youth and prison ministry.   In 181, a second community was established, at the Marian shrine of Notre Dame du Laus.   This became the occasion for the missionaries to become a religious congregation, united through vows and the evangelical counsels.   Changing their name to Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, the group received papal approbation on 17 February 1826.

Foreign Missions
In 1841, Bishop Bourget of Montreal invited the Oblates to Canada.   At the same time there was an outreach to the British Isles.   This was the beginning of an inspiring history of missionary outreach to the most abandoned peoples in Canada, United States, Mexico, England and Ireland, Algeria, Southern Africa and Ceylon during the Founder’s lifetime. In 200 years this zeal spread and took root in the establishment of the Oblates in nearly 70 countries.

From 1837 to 1861, he was the Bishop of Marseille, in Provence (south-eastern France). During his episcopacy, he commissioned Notre-Dame de la Garde, an ornate Neo-Byzantine basilica on the south side of the old port of Marseille  . He inspired local priest Joseph-Marie Timon-David to found the Congregation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Marseille in 1852.

notre dame de la garde - marseilles
Notre-Dame de la Garde, Marseilles

Towards the end of his life, Eugene had become very free.   Faced with the prospect of the Cardinalate which had been promised and which slipped away from him because of political considerations, he had this to say:  “After all, it is all the same whether one is buried in a red cassock or a purple one;  the main thing is that the bishop gets to heaven”.

st eugene framedst eugene bishopst eugene - bishop 2st eugene de mazenod - official pic

Shortly before his death on May 21, 1861, in keeping with his temperament, the elderly and seriously ill bishop said to those around him:  “Should I happen to doze off, or if I appear to be getting worse, please wake me up!   I want to die knowing that I am dying”.
His last words to the Oblates were a testament that summed up his life:  “Practice well among yourselves charity, charity, charity and outside, zeal for the salvation of souls”.   Saint Eugene died on Pentecost Sunday, to the prayer of the Salve Regina.   It was his final salute on earth to the one he considered as the “Mother of the Mission”.

St Eugene was Beatified on 19 October 1975 by Blessed Pope Paul VI and Canonised on 3 December 1995 by Sr Pope John Paul II.

21 May 2017 – more info from Vatican Resources on St Eugene:  https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/saint-of-the-day-21-may-st-eugene-de-mazenod-o-m-i/

st eugene - canonisation
On the 150th anniversary of the Death of St Eugene in the Basilica he built, Notre-Dame de la Garde. Marseilles

st eugene de mazonod_collage

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 21 May – St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I.

Saint of the Day – 21 May – St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I. (1 August 1782 at Aix-en-Provence, southern France as Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod – • 21 May 1861 at Marseille, France of cancer)  • on 12 December 1936, his body was exhumed and found to be intact;  • part of his heart is venerated at Blessed Sacrament Chapel at the Oblate-owned Lourdes Grotto of the Southwest in San Antonio, Texas, USA.  Bishop, Founder of the Congregation of Missionaries Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Missionary, Writer, Preacher, Evangeliser.  Known as a “second Paul”.

CHARLES JOSEPH EUGENE DE MAZENOD came into a world that was destined to change very quickly.   Born in Aix-en-Provence in the south of France on August 1, 1782, he seemed assured of position and wealth from his family, who were of the minor nobility. However, the turmoil of the French Revolution changed all that forever.   When Eugene was just eight years old his family fled France, leaving their possessions behind, and started a long and increasingly difficult eleven year exile.

The Years in Italy

The Mazenod family, political refugees, trailed through a succession of cities in Italy.    His father, who had been President of the Court of Accounts, Aids and Finances in Aix, was forced to try his hand at trade to support his family.   He proved to be a poor businessman and as the years went on the family came close to destitution.   Eugene studied briefly at the College of Nobles in Turin but a move to Venice meant the end to formal schooling.    A sympathetic priest, Don Bartolo Zinelli, living nearby, undertook to educate the young French emigre.    Don Bartolo gave the adolescent Eugene a fundamental education but with a lasting sense of God and a regimen of piety which was to stay with him always, despite the ups and downs of his life.    A further move to Naples, because of financial problems, led to a time of boredom and helplessness.    The family moved again, this time to Palermo where, thanks to the kindness of the Duke and Duchess of Cannizzaro, Eugene had his first taste of noble living and found it very much to his liking.    He took to himself the title of “Count” de Mazenod, did all the courtly things, and dreamed of a bright future.

 

Return to France: the Priesthood

In 1802, at the age of 20, Eugene was able to return to his homeland – and all his dreams and illusions were quickly shattered.    He was just plain “Citizen” de Mazenod, France was a changed world, his parents had separated, his mother was fighting to get back the family possessions.    She was also intent on marrying off Eugene to the richest possible heiress.    He sank into depression, seeing little real future for himself.    But his natural qualities of concern for others, together with the faith fostered in Venice began to assert themselves.    He was deeply affected by the disastrous situation of the French Church, which had been ridiculed, attacked and decimated by the Revolution.    A calling to the priesthood began to manifest itself and Eugene answered that call.    Despite opposition from his mother, he entered the seminary of St. Sulpice in Paris and on December 21, 1811, he was ordained a priest in Amiens.

 

Apostolic endeavours: Oblates of Mary Immaculate

Returning to Aix-en-Provence, he did not take up a normal parish appointment but started to exercise his priesthood in the care of the truly spiritually needy-prisoners, youth, servants, country villagers.   Often in the face of opposition from the local clergy, Eugene pursued his course.   Soon he sought out other equally zealous priests who were prepared to step outside the old, even outmoded, structures.   Eugene and his men preached in Provencal, the language of the common people, not in “educated” French. From village to village they went, instructing at the level of the people, spending amazingly long hours in the confessional.   In between these parish missions the group joined in an intense community life of prayer, study and fellowship. T  hey called themselves “Missionaries of Provence”.   However, so that there would be an assured continuity in the work, Eugene took the bold step of going directly to the Pope and asking that his group be recognised officially as a Religious Congregation of pontifical right.   His faith and his persistence paid off-and on February 17d, 1826, Pope Leo XII approved the new Congregation, the “Oblates of Mary Immaculate”.   Eugene was elected Superior General and continued to inspire and guide his men for 35 years, until his death. Together with their growing apostolic endeavours-preaching, youth work, care of shrines, prison chaplaincy, confessors, direction of seminaries, parishes – Eugene insisted on deep spiritual formation and a close community life.   He was a man who loved Christ with passion and was always ready to take on any apostolate if he saw it answering the needs of the Church.   The “glory of God, the good of the Church and the sanctification of souls” were impelling forces for him.

Bishop o f Marseilles

The Diocese of Marseilles had been suppressed after the 1802 Concordat and when it was re-established, Eugene’s aged uncle, Canon Fortune de Mazenod, was named Bishop.   He appointed Eugene Vicar General immediately and most of the difficult work of re-building the Diocese fell to him.   Within a few years, in 1832, Eugene himself was named auxiliary bishop.   His Episcopal ordination took place in Rome, in defiance of the pretensions of the French Government that it had the right to sanction all such appointments.   This caused a bitter diplomatic battle and Eugene was caught in the middle, with accusations, misunderstandings, threats and recriminations swirling around him.   It was an especially devastating time for him, further complicated by the growing pains of his religious family.   Though battered, Eugene steered ahead resolutely, and finally the impasse was broken.   Five years later, he was appointed to the See of Marseilles as its Bishop, when Bishop Fortune retired.

A heart as big as the world

Whilst he had founded the Oblates of Mary Immaculate primarily to serve the spiritually needy and deprived of the French countryside, Eugene’s zeal for the Kingdom of God and his devotion to the Church moved the Oblates to the advancing edge of the apostolate. His men ventured into Switzerland, England, Ireland.   Because of his zeal, Eugene had been dubbed “a second Paul,” and bishops from the missions came to him asking for Oblates for their expanding mission fields.   Eugene responded willingly despite small initial numbers and sent his men out to Canada, to the United States, to Ceylon (Sri Lanka), to South Africa, to Basutoland (Lesotho).   As missionaries in his mould, they fanned out preaching, baptising, caring.   They frequently opened up previously uncharted lands, established and manned many new dioceses and in a multitude of ways they “left nothing undared that the Kingdom of Christ might be advanced.”   In the years that followed, the Oblate mission thrust continued, so that today the impulse of Eugene de Mazenod is alive in his men in 68 different countries.

Pastor of his Diocese

During all this ferment of missionary activity, Eugene was an outstanding pastor of the Church of Marseilles-ensuring the best seminary training for his priests, establishing new parishes, building the city’s cathedral and the spectacular Shrine of Notre Dame de la Garde above the city, encouraging his priests to lives of holiness, introducing many Religious Congregations to work in the diocese, leading his fellow Bishops in support of the rights of the Pope. He grew into a towering figure in the French Church.   In 1856, Napoleon III appointed him a Senator and at his death he was the senior bishop of France.

Legacy of a Saint

May 21, 1861, saw Eugene de Mazenod returning to his God, at the age of 79, after a life crowded with achievements, many of them born in suffering.   For his religious family and for his diocese, he was a founding and life-giving source:  for God and for the Church, he was a faithful and generous son.   As he lay dying he left his Oblates a final testament, “Among yourselves-charity, charity, charity: in the world-zeal for souls.” The Church in declaring him a saint on December 3, 1995, crowns these two pivots of his living-love and zeal.   His life and his deeds remain for all a window unto God Himself. And that is the greatest gift that Eugene de Mazenod, Oblate of Mary Immaculate, can offer us.

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 5 July – Blessed Joseph Boissel OMI (1909-1969) Priest and Martyr

Saint of the Day – 5 July – Blessed Joseph Boissel OMI (1909-1969) Priest and Martyr, Missionary of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Founded by St Eugene de Mazenod, Apostle of sick – born on 20 December 1909 in Le Loroux, Ille-et-Vilaine, of the Archdiocese of Rennes , in Brittany France and died by being shot on 5 July 1969 on the road near Hat I-Et, Bolikhamxay, Laos, aged 59.   He is one of the Seventeen Martyrs of Laos (including ten French, six Laotians and an Italian), whose combined Feast day is 16 November.bl joseph boissel.2jpg

Joseph Boissel was born 20 December 1909 in the Marches of Brittany (France), in the hamlet of La Tiolais, outside the town of Loroux. into a family of modest farmers and became fatherless at the age of fourteen. He entered the Minor Seminary of the Oblates of Marie-Immaculate. His masters found him “conscientious, very devoted, honest and frank” and especially “very attached to his vocation.”   He was Ordained a Priest on 4 July 1937.bl joseph boissel very young

Fr Joseph received his orders to the brand new mission of Laos, begun less than two years earlier.   He arrived in Laos in 1938.

In March 1945, the Japanese hit Laos.   On 1 June Fr Joseph Boissel was captured with his companion Father Vincent Le Calvez and the Apostolic Prefect, Msgr Jean Mazoyer, OMI.   All three were taken to Vinh, Vietnam, where they were held among a hostile population.  Back in Laos in 1946, Joseph again found his Tran Ninh peoples and had contact with the Hmong.bl joseoph boissel young

On Saturday, 5 July 1969, he decided to go to Hat I-Êt, a village of Kmhmu’ refugees a good 20 kilometers from Paksane, going up along the River Nam San.   Because of the lack of security, that year he had been unable to go there to administer the Sacraments, for several months.   The Catechist André Van was there and he needed to know that he was supported.

Setting out around four in the afternoon, he took two young Laotian Oblate Missionaries with him as usual, they were to help him with the visits, the care of the sick and the religious service.Blessed-Joseph-Boissel

The following is told by one of the two passengers, the only survivor able to do so:

Two or three kilometers before arriving at the village, at a bend in the road, I heard a burst of gunfire aimed at us.   The tires blew out and I was hit in the hand.   I saw a red flag moving in the forest bordering our route.   A second burst of gunfire and Thérèse was hit in the head, since I am smaller, the bullets did not hit me.   The firing came from the left, on the driver’s side.

Father Boissel was hit in the head – near the mouth and in the skull. The jeep went into a ditch, turned over on us and burst into flames. Father’s glasses were broken, he died on the spot… His big eyes were open.   All three of us were completely covered with blood.

Father Boissel was dead, Thérèse was unconscious.   I was in a huge daze… not moving… like dead.   But I saw three young Vietnamese soldiers going around the vehicle three times.   One said: “Let’s kill them!” – “Let’s burn the vehicle and its occupants!”   They moved away and threw a grenade at the car.   The grenade exploded – it was the explosions that caused our injuries.   I said, “O Lord!” but veil of darkness came over me…

I don’t know how long we stayed like that in the car.   But Thérèse came to first.   She pushed me to get out…   The grenade had deafened us…   It was difficult for us to communicate, to understand one another…   Both of us prayed to the Lord:   “If you still need us… send someone to help us.”   We went to sleep along the road.   I put my hand on Thérèse’s heart and she put hers on my heart – united in suffering.

Oh, we had to wait a long time, from 4:30 until about 9:30.   Finally, some people arrived to pick us up.   Father’s body had been burned to the point that his face was totally unrecognisable.   Thérèse, hit in the head, remained mentally handicapped as a result of the attack.   She really has no happiness in living.”

Fr Joseph was Beatified on 11 December 2016 by Pope Francis.   The recognition was celebrated in Laos, presided by Cardinal Angelo Amato.   Below are the six OMI Martys of Laos and all the Martyrs of the region.

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bl joseph boissel

Posted in Uncategorized

Saint of the Day – 24 August – St Emilie de Vialar (1797–1856)

Saint of the Day – 24 August – St Emilie de Vialar (1797–1856) Religious Sister and Founder of tbe Sisters of St Joseph of the Apparition, Apostle of Charity – born on 12 September 1797 at Gaillace, Albi, southern France as Anne Marguerite Adelaide Emily de Vialar and died on 24 August 1856 at Marseilles, Bouches-du-Rhône, France of natural causes.  Patron of her Order and Gaillace, France.st emily de vialar

Emilie de Vialar was born in 1797 to a rich and distinguished family in an ancient town in the south of France called Gaillac, not far from Toulouse.   Her paternal grandfather was a magistrate and Emilie’s own father, an educated man, held important administrative positions in Gaillac.   Her maternal grandfather, Baron de Portal, belonged to a family of pharmacists and became physician to both Kings Louis Philippe and Charles X.   Her mother was a devout woman, and educated Emilie in the faith from her earliest years.   Just at the time Emilie was due to attend boarding school in Paris her mother died.   After two years there, during which time she made her First Communion, her father called her home to take charge of the household and be his companion at social events.

Emilie’s presence at home was greatly resented by a jealous and interfering housekeeper who made her life almost intolerable over the years, misrepresenting her to her father in many different ways.   Emilie bore this constant suffering and unpleasantness with patience and resignation.

From an early age Emilie had been inspired with an ardent love for God and for the sick poor and suffering people of Gaillac and its surrounds, who eked out a miserable existence alongside the affluent high society of aristocratic France.   She was attracted to prayer and at various times in her life she was blessed with a special spiritual experience.   After one such experience, at the age of 19, she began to set about her works of charity in a very definite and organised way.   She aimed to help people in whatever way she could, taking food and remedies to the poor and even having them come to her own home to receive help.   Her father did not approve of these charitable works and she later wrote, “I continued to perform works of charity towards the poor and this was the occasion of many domestic troubles.” 

Another specific grace encouraged Emilie to make the decision to devote her life entirely to God and to always accomplish his will.   She spent considerable time in prayer in the privacy of her room and made many clandestine visits to the church, which was another cause for dissension between herself and her father.   There were also many arguments when she dismissed several young men who sought her hand in marriage.   As she matured, she gradually formed the idea of founding a Congregation so that the sick and poor could have constant care and attention day and night.

Being determined to accomplish the will of God, Emilie confided her ideas to the new curate, Fr Mercier who encouraged and guided her, giving her a plan of life – pious practices in the church, patience at home and apostolic duties in the parish.   During this time of prayer and discernment seeking to know God’s plans, she was “instrumental in bringing sinful women and girls to repentance, converted some Protestants and cured several poor sick who were considered hopeless by the doctors.”

In 1832 her maternal grandfather died and she received a substantial legacy, with this independence she was able to set about bringing her plans to fruition.   “Although for twenty years, my life in my father’s house was so painful that only the consideration of fulfilling God’s will gave me the strength to remain there, nevertheless, it cost me greatly to determine to leave my father on account of the grief I knew the separation would cause him.   I left my father’s house to found in my own town the work I believed to be advantageous to the interest of God’s glory and the well-being of others less fortunate.”  In the evening of Christmas Day 1832, after leaving a long affectionate letter for her father and arranging for her younger brother’s wife to be attentive to his needs, she left with three companions to set up the fledgling community that was to spread far and wide within her lifetime.

Within six months the little group had increased to twenty-six. Emilie next sought and obtained the approval of the district Archbishop, Mgr de Gualy of Albi.   Within a few more months he approved the Rule of the Congregation.   Besides providing relief for the poorer classes with soup, linen and remedies, caring for the sick and aged in their homes, the sisters also saw to the free education of children.  There was much criticism and malicious gossip in the small town but the sisters carried on regardless.

In 1833 Emilie’s brother Augustin, who had been among the first French settlers to colonise Algeria, suggested that she send some of her sisters to the capital, in particular to staff the hospital just being built.   This was Emilie’s chance to put into action a long held dream to work in mission countries.   The following year an official request came from the Municipal Council of Algiers for staff for the hospital.   Emilie accompanied the three sisters chosen to begin this missionary work, arriving in Algiers in August 1835, – in the midst of a cholera epidemic.   Muslims, Jews, Europeans were all affected and all received the same unselfish care and nursing without distinction.   By the end of 1836 there were twenty sisters at work on this mission, Emilie having purchased buildings with a view to future needs.   Under pressure from the Bishop the French Government had decreed that the sisters must leave Algeria, after eight years of selfless service to the colony and this took place at a moment’s notice.   Resourceful woman that she was, Emilie soon had these valiant missionaries deployed in other foundations where they continued to carry out their works of mercy.   It is to be noted that the bishop later regretted his actions and sought forgiveness from the woman he had maligned.

In 1845, Emilie was on her way from Tunis to Algeria when ship on which she was travelling was caught in a terrible storm for nine days.   Emilie vowed “that wherever they landed safe and sound, she would open a house and dedicate it to St Paul”. The ship came to rest at Malta, where Emily opened one of the first Catholic schools for young ladies.

Meanwhile back in Gaillac the local superior, deceived by an unscrupulous businessman, had accumulated debts.   She abandoned the Congregation and sued for the return of his dowry.   Beset by slander and creditors, Mother de Vialar was forced to leave her hometown.   Her inheritance now long gone on the many institutions she built.   By 1852, Emilie had decided that living in Toulouse was no longer an option, so she began to look further afield.

She decided on Marseilles, the port in which took place all the arrivals and departures of her missionaries.   After five years of privation, humiliation, disappointed hopes, physical and moral suffering, Emilie at last met an understanding and friendly advocate in the person of Mgr de Mazenod, Bishop of Marseilles and founder of a missionary order of men, the Oblates of Mary Immaculate (St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861). Finances were still a problem for her and it was some time before the sisters were able to count on a steady income from their work.   She was to write in 1855, “Had I not become poor I would not have been able to establish the Congregation.” [Letter to Sr Eugénie Laurez 3 Jan 1855]   She was fifty-five and now at last was able to experience some peace and stability in her life.

During all those troubled times requests for sisters in missionary countries were numerous and Emilie still found time to establish new houses, and those already existing were flourishing.

How did she cope with so many anxieties, trials and disappointments, so much opposition and heartbreak?   Through her prayer and spiritual life she had developed a very close relationship with God, who favoured her with intimate graces and support. She had learnt to depend totally on the Providence of God and such was her faith and confidence that she was able to function, secure in the knowledge that she was following God’s will.   She was thirty-five before she felt she had finally discerned what God wanted her to do with her life in his service.   From then on she pursued her task with untiring zeal, courage and perseverance.

Her comparative peaceful existence in Marseilles was not to last for long.   In mid August of 1856 Emilie was taken ill and at first her illness was thought to be cholera.   The doctor had difficulty making a diagnosis but managed to relieve the pain.   She gradually worsened and within five days, on 24 August, she died peacefully, surrounded by her Sisters and her nieces.   “The saint is dead,” said the poor people who knew her kindness. It was only after her death that it was realised that her illness was a strangulated hernia which she had sustained many years before.   As a young woman, while attending to the poor on the terrace of her family home she had dragged a large bag of flour up the steps to the terrace and that had caused the damage.   She had suffered intermittently from this act of charity all her life.   The funeral service was conducted with the greatest simplicity and sorrow was tinged with joy, as the life of this valiant woman had been a gift from God to her Sisters.

At her death she was almost fifty nine and during the brief period of twenty four years that her Congregation had been in existence she had supplied missionaries for countries as varied as Algeria, Tunisia, France, Italy, Cyprus, Malta, Syria, Greece, Burma, Palestine, Turkey, Crete and Australia, having made forty two foundations in all.

Her sanctity was officially recognised by the Church when she was Canonised on 24 June 1951 by Pope Pius XII.   Her Feast day is celebrated on 17th June within her Order and today, 24 August in the General Calendar.

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 29 May – Blessed Joseph Gerard O.M.I. (1831-1914) “The Apostle of Lesotho”

Saint of the Day – 29 May – Blessed Joseph Gerard O.M.I. (1831-1914) Priest, Religious, Missionary “The Apostle of Lesotho”,   (12 March 1831 – 29 May 1914) was a French Roman Catholic priest and a professed member from the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, the order founded by St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I. (1782-1861), Bishop of Marseille, founder of the Congregation of the Missionaries, Oblates of Mary Immaculate whose Memorial we celebrated on 21 May.Header - bl-joseph-grard-800-400

Joseph Gerard was born in 1831 in Bouxieres-aux-Chenes in the Diocese of Nancy, France.   He joined the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate at the age of 20 and at the age of 22 was sent by St Eugene de Mazenod as a missionary to Southern Africa, never to see his family or homeland again.   He was ordained a priest in 1854 in Pietermaritzburg and at first served the Oblate mission to the Zulu people, later joining Bishop Allard, the Bishop of Natal, in setting up the first Catholic mission in Lesotho.   With the permission of the great Chief Moshoeshoe they founded Motse-oa-Ma-Jesu (the Village of the Mother of Jesus) thirty two kilometres south of Moshoeshoe’s stronghold of Thaba Bosiu.   (The village which they founded later became Roma, site of the Catholic University College and now the University of Lesotho.)bl joseph gerard omi

Joseph Gerard was well respected by Chief Moshoeshoe, particulaly because he remained with the Basotho during the three wars between the Basotho and the Orange Free State. It is said that it was through Joseph Gerard’s efforts that Chief Moshoeshoe sought the protection of the British at the end of the wars, a decision which resulted in Lesotho becoming a British Protectorate and an Independent country today.

Joseph Gerard’s mission grew slowly and by the end of 1879, when he was already 48 years of age, there were only 700 Catholics in Lesotho.   He persevered, however in prayer, faith and work, remaining in Lesotho as a missionary for the rest of his life.bljoseph

The Oblate mission to the Basotho grew and flourished.   He died on 29 May 1914 at the age of 83, a man greatly revered by the people of Lesotho.   The fact that Lesotho is very largely a Catholic country today, can be traced back to those early beginnings at the Village of the Mother of Jesus.

Father Joseph Gerard was Beatified by Pope John-Paul II in Maseru, Lesotho, in 1988.

 

Throughout his years in Lesotho Fr Gerard’s concern and care for the sick and the old was remarkable.   Despite the distance, despite the weather, despite the inconvenience, he would set out, on foot or on horseback, carrying the Blessed Sacrament, to minister to those afflicted.   His deep devotion to Mary was absorbed by his first converts and since his day the nation has been dedicated to Mary Immaculate.

The last years of Fr Gerard´s life were spent back at his first mission, Roma.   Up to a month before his death he was on horseback, out on the mountain tracks caring for those in need.

In one of his retreat notes, Fr Gerard gave the key to his constancy when he wrote about the people he served:   “We must love them, love them in spite of everything, love them always”.   He lived out his belief in the joy of spreading God’s Word, despite the hardships and opposition he encountered.

Blessed Joseph Gerard, Pray for Africa, pray for us all!gerard-1

Posted in CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN TITLES, MARY, MATER ECCLESIAE, Papa FRANCIS, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, VATICAN Resources, YouTube VIDEOS

The First of the Universal Celebration of the Official Memorial of Mary, Mother of the Church/Maria, Mater Ecclesiae and Memorials of the Saints – 21 May 2018

Maria, Mater Ecclesiae/Mary Mother of the Church – the First Official Memorial of this new feast day to be held this year, 2018.   Vatican Decree here: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/pope-francis-institutes-new-celebration-of-mary-mother-of-the-church/decree - mater ecclesiae - new memorial monday after pentecost - 4 march 2018

Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution (Optional Memorial):   The 1917 Mexican constitution was pointedly anti-clerical and anti-Church, and its adoption instituted years of violent religious persecution including expulsion of foreign priests, closing of parochial schools, and the murders of several priests and lay leaders who work to minister to the faithful and support religious freedom.   25 of them who died at different times and places but all as a result of this persecution were celebrated together.   They each have separate memorials but are also remembered as a group.

• Saint Agustin Caloca Cortes
• Saint Atilano Cruz Alvarado
• Saint Cristobal Magallanes Jara
• Saint David Galván-Bermúdez
• Saint David Roldán-Lara
• Saint David Uribe-Velasco
• Saint Jenaro Sánchez DelGadillo
• Saint Jesús Méndez-Montoya
• Saint Jose Isabel Flores Varela
• Saint José María Robles Hurtado
• Saint Julio álvarez Mendoza
• Saint Justino Orona Madrigal
• Saint Luis Batiz Sainz
• Saint Manuel Moralez
• Saint Margarito Flores-García
• Saint Mateo Correa-Magallanes
• Saint Miguel de la Mora
• Saint Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
• Saint Pedro Esqueda Ramírez
• Saint Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán
• Saint Roman Adame Rosales
• Saint Sabas Reyes Salazar
• Saint Salvador Lara Puente
• Saint Toribio Romo González
• Saint Tranquilino Ubiarco Robles

Canonised: 21 May 2000 by Pope John Paul II

St Adalric of Bèze
Bl Adilio Daronch
St Ageranus of Bèze
St Ansuinus of Bèze
St Antiochus of Caesarea Philippi
St Bairfhion of Killbarron
St Berard of Bèze
St Collen of Denbighshire

St Constantine the Great
St Donatus of Caesarea
St Eugene de Mazenod O.M.I. (1782-1861)

St Eutychius of Mauretania
Bl Franz Jägerstätter
St Genesius of Bèze
St Godric of Finchale
Bl Hemming of Åbo
St Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice
Bl Hyacinth-Marie Cormier
St Isberga of Aire
Bl Jean Mopinot
Bl Lucio del Rio
St Mancio of Évora
Bl Manuel Gómez González
St Nicostratus of Caesarea Philippi
Bl Pietro Parenzo
St Polieuctus of Caesarea
St Polius of Mauretania
St Restituta of Corsica
St Rodron of Bèze
St Secundinus of Cordova
St Secundus of Alexandria
St Serapion the Sindonite
St Sifrard of Bèze
Bl Silao
St Synesius
St Theobald of Vienne
St Theopompus
St Timothy of Mauretania
St Valens of Auxerre
St Vales
St Victorius of Caesarea

Martyrs of Egypt:  Large number of bishops, priests, deacons and lay people banished when the Arian heretics seized the diocese of Alexandria, Egypt in 357 and drove out Saint Athanasius and other orthodox Christians.   Many were old, many infirm and many, many died of abuse and privations while on the road and in the wilderness.   Very few survived to return to their homes in 361 when Julian the Apostate recalled all Christians and then many of those later died in the persecutions of Julian.

Martyrs of Pentecost in Alexandria:  An unspecified number of Christian clerics and lay people who, on Pentecost in 338, were rounded up by order of the Arian bishop and emperor Constantius and were either killed, or exiled, for refusing to accept Arian teachings.   339 in Alexandria, Egypt.

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 21 May

St Eugene de Mazenod OMI (1782-1861)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/saint-of-the-day-21-may-st-eugene-de-mazenod-o-m-i-1782-1861/

Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution (Optional Memorial):   The 1917 Mexican constitution was pointedly anti-clerical and anti-Church, and its adoption instituted years of violent religious persecution including expulsion of foreign priests, closing of parochial schools and the murders of several priests and lay leaders who work to minister to the faithful and support religious freedom.   25 of them who died at different times and places but all as a result of this persecution were celebrated together.   They each have separate memorials but are also remembered as a group.

• Saint Agustin Caloca Cortes
• Saint Atilano Cruz Alvarado
• Saint Cristobal Magallanes Jara
• Saint David Galván-Bermúdez
• Saint David Roldán-Lara
• Saint David Uribe-Velasco
• Saint Jenaro Sánchez DelGadillo
• Saint Jesús Méndez-Montoya
• Saint Jose Isabel Flores Varela

• Saint “Joselito” José Luis Sánchez del Río (1913-1928) Aged 14
Memorial 10 February
Dear Joselito!
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/10/saint-of-the-day-10-february-st-jose-sanchez-del-rio-joselito-1913-1928-boy-martyr/comment-page-1/

• Saint José María Robles Hurtado
• Saint Julio álvarez Mendoza
• Saint Justino Orona Madrigal
• Saint Luis Batiz Sainz
• Saint Manuel Moralez
• Saint Margarito Flores-García
• Saint Mateo Correa-Magallanes
• Saint Miguel de la Mora
• Saint Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero

• Saint Pedro Esqueda Ramírez
About St Pedro:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/11/22/saint-of-the-day-22-november-saint-pedro-esqueda-ramirez-1887-1927-priest-and-martyr-of-the-cristero-war/

• Saint Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán

• Saint Roman Adame Rosales
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2020/04/21/saint-of-the-day-21-april-saint-roman-adame-rosales-1859-1927-priest-and-martyr

• Saint Sabas Reyes Salazar
His Life and Martyrdom:
https://anastpaul.com/2020/04/13/saint-of-the-day-13-april-st-jose-sabas-reyes-salazar-1883-1927-priest-and-martyr/

• Saint Salvador Lara Puente
• Saint Toribio Romo González
• Saint Tranquilino Ubiarco Robles

Canonised:  21 May 2000 by Pope John Paul II

St Adalric of Bèze
Bl Adilio Daronch
St Ageranus of Bèze
St Ansuinus of Bèze
St Antiochus of Caesarea Philippi
St Arcangelo Tadini (1846–1912)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/05/21/saint-of-the-day-21-may-saint-arcangelo-tadini-1846-1912/

St Bairfhion of Killbarron
St Berard of Bèze
St Collen of Denbighshire

St Constantine the Great
St Donatus of Caesarea
St Eutychius of Mauretania

Blessed Franz Jägerstätter OFS (1907-1943) Layman Martyr

The first video is from the author of a biography of Blessed Franz.   His life of “Conscientious Objection” is very appropriate for the times we find ourselves in right now!
The second video contains an interview and details of the Film made about Blessed Franz “A Hidden Life.”

St Genesius of Bèze
St Godric of Finchale
Bl Hemming of Åbo
St Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice
Bl Hyacinth-Marie Cormier
St Isberga of Aire
Bl Jean Mopinot
Bl Lucio del Rio
St Mancio of Évora
Bl Manuel Gómez González
St Nicostratus of Caesarea Philippi
Bl Pietro Parenzo
St Polieuctus of Caesarea
St Polius of Mauretania
St Restituta of Corsica
St Rodron of Bèze
St Secundinus of Cordova
St Secundus of Alexandria
St Serapion the Sindonite
St Sifrard of Bèze
Bl Silao
St Synesius
St Theobald of Vienne
St Theopompus
St Timothy of Mauretania
St Valens of Auxerre
St Vales
St Victorius of Caesarea

Martyrs of Egypt:  Large number of bishops, priests, deacons and lay people banished when the Arian heretics seized the diocese of Alexandria, Egypt in 357 and drove out Saint Athanasius and other orthodox Christians.   Many were old, many infirm and many, many died of abuse and privations while on the road and in the wilderness.   Very few survived to return to their homes in 361 when Julian the Apostate recalled all Christians and then many of those later died in the persecutions of Julian.

Martyrs of Pentecost in Alexandria:  An unspecified number of Christian clerics and lay people who, on Pentecost in 338, were rounded up by order of the Arian bishop and emperor Constantius and were either killed, or exiled, for refusing to accept Arian teachings. 339 in Alexandria, Egypt.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, St Pope JOHN PAUL

Thought for the Day – 21 May – Lord grant us such zeal!   

Thought for the Day – 21 May – Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Easter, C and The Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod OMI (1782-1861)

Born into a noble family in Aix (Provence), Saint Eugene spent part of his childhood in Italy because of the French Revolution. Ordained a priest at Amiens in 1811, he soon organised missionaries to go to rural parts of Provence, instructing the people whose religious training had been disrupted for many years by the French Revolution and its aftermath.

Eugene began the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in 1816, obtaining papal approval for them 10 years later.   From rural preaching, they soon moved into running seminaries to improve the quality of the clergy.   Their first foreign mission was in Canada in 1841; soon they were in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America.

In 1851, Eugene followed his uncle as archbishop of Marseilles where he died 10 years later.   He had focused his energies on Church renewal and reform while vigorously defending the Church’s right to spread the Good News.

His congregation has grown to become one of the largest in the Church, serving in over 68 countries, especially in Africa and Canada.   Many of its members have become missionary bishops.

At Eugene’s Canonisation in 1998, St Pope John Paul II praised his vision, perseverance, and conformity to God’s will, saying:  “His influence is not limited to the age in which he lived but continues its effect on our time…

Saint Eugene de Mazenod allowed the grace of God to bear rich fruit in his life.   That required a certain amount of flexibility, as well as courage, to face the problems every growing group encounters.   We look to saints like Eugene not to borrow their courage and zeal but, with God’s grace, to discover our own, always seeking first God’s kingdom (see Matthew 6:33).

Note:  We have these Oblates in our Diocese in the Western Cape, South Africa, whilst they look the same as any other priest, they are not – they follow the pattern of St Eugene and are vessels, by the grace of God, of His marvellous and effective love and zeal!

Lord grant us such zeal!   

St Eugene de Mazenod, Pray for Us!st eugene de mazenod pray for us 21 may 2019

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on PEACE, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD, THOMAS a KEMPIS

One Minute Reflection – 21 May – “My peace I give to you”

One Minute Reflection – 21 May – Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Easter, C, Gospel: John 14:27–31 and the Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)

“My peace I give to you”... John 14:27john 14 27 my peace if give to you - 21 may 2019.jpg

REFLECTION – “We could have great peace if we were willing not to busy ourselves with the sayings and doings of others, for which we bear no responsibility.   How can you remain long at peace, if you interfere in other people’s business, if you are on the watch for a chance to leave your solitude, if your inner recollection is slight and sporadic? Blessed are the simple, for they have great peace.   What is it that made some of the saints such perfect contemplatives?   Their whole study was to deaden themselves to every earthly desire and so they could wholly cleave to God, from the very depth of their heart and freely give time to Himself.    But as for us, we are too much taken up with our appetites, too anxious about transitory things.   We seldom perfectly conquer even one fault, so frigid and tepid we remain.

If we were perfectly dead to ourselves and free of all inner involvements; then we could also taste the things of God and have some experience of heavenly contemplation.   It is total and utter hindrance to me that we are not free from passion and lust and we do not undertake the perfect way of the Saints.   When we meet with even slight adversity, we are quickly thrown and we turn to human comforts.   If we were to try like gallant warriors, to stand firm in battle, then surely we should see the help of God upon us from heaven.   For He is ready to help those who struggle, hoping in His grace…   If you did but mind what peace for yourself, what joy for others your good dispositions would secure!   I think you would take much more thought for spiritual progress.”… Thomas à Kempis (1380-1471) – The Imitation of Christ – Book 1, ch.11how can you remain long at peace - thomas a mepis - 21 may 2019.jpg

PRAYER – Loving Father, grant us the grace to strive after perfect love.   Help us to bring forth frequents acts of love so that we may grow in this greatest of virtues.   In the great love of Your divine Son, who gave Himself for us, He filled us with peace and hope.   May these gifts grow always in our hearts.   We ask for the intercession of Mary, the Blessed Virgin, His Mother and of St Eugene de Mazenod, who overflowed with love, they said his heart was as big as the world.   Through Christ our Lord, with the Holy Spirit, God forever, amen.holy-mother-mary-at-prayer-pray-for-us-21-may-2018

st eugene de mazenod pray for us 2 21 may 2019.jpg

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 21 May

St Eugene de Mazenod OMI (1782-1861)
Biography:   https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/saint-of-the-day-21-may-st-eugene-de-mazenod-o-m-i-1782-1861/

Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution (Optional Memorial):   The 1917 Mexican constitution was pointedly anti-clerical and anti-Church, and its adoption instituted years of violent religious persecution including expulsion of foreign priests, closing of parochial schools, and the murders of several priests and lay leaders who work to minister to the faithful and support religious freedom. 25 of them who died at different times and places but all as a result of this persecution were celebrated together.   They each have separate memorials but are also remembered as a group.

• Saint Agustin Caloca Cortes
• Saint Atilano Cruz Alvarado
• Saint Cristobal Magallanes Jara
• Saint David Galván-Bermúdez
• Saint David Roldán-Lara
• Saint David Uribe-Velasco
• Saint Jenaro Sánchez DelGadillo
• Saint Jesús Méndez-Montoya
• Saint Jose Isabel Flores Varela
• Saint “Joselito” José Luis Sánchez del Río (1913-1928) Aged 14
Memorial 10 February
Biography:   https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/10/saint-of-the-day-10-february-st-jose-sanchez-del-rio-joselito-1913-1928-boy-martyr/comment-page-1/
• Saint José María Robles Hurtado
• Saint Julio álvarez Mendoza
• Saint Justino Orona Madrigal
• Saint Luis Batiz Sainz
• Saint Manuel Moralez
• Saint Margarito Flores-García
• Saint Mateo Correa-Magallanes
• Saint Miguel de la Mora
• Saint Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
• Saint Pedro Esqueda Ramírez
• Saint Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán
• Saint Roman Adame Rosales
• Saint Sabas Reyes Salazar
• Saint Salvador Lara Puente
• Saint Toribio Romo González
• Saint Tranquilino Ubiarco Robles

Canonised: 21 May 2000 by Pope John Paul II

St Adalric of Bèze
Bl Adilio Daronch
St Ageranus of Bèze
St Ansuinus of Bèze
St Antiochus of Caesarea Philippi
St Arcangelo Tadini (1846–1912)

St Bairfhion of Killbarron
St Berard of Bèze
St Collen of Denbighshire

St Constantine the Great
St Donatus of Caesarea
St Eutychius of Mauretania
Bl Franz Jägerstätter
St Genesius of Bèze
St Godric of Finchale
Bl Hemming of Åbo
St Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice
Bl Hyacinth-Marie Cormier
St Isberga of Aire
Bl Jean Mopinot
Bl Lucio del Rio
St Mancio of Évora
Bl Manuel Gómez González
St Nicostratus of Caesarea Philippi
Bl Pietro Parenzo
St Polieuctus of Caesarea
St Polius of Mauretania
St Restituta of Corsica
St Rodron of Bèze
St Secundinus of Cordova
St Secundus of Alexandria
St Serapion the Sindonite
St Sifrard of Bèze
Bl Silao
St Synesius
St Theobald of Vienne
St Theopompus
St Timothy of Mauretania
St Valens of Auxerre
St Vales
St Victorius of Caesarea

Martyrs of Egypt: Large number of bishops, priests, deacons and lay people banished when the Arian heretics seized the diocese of Alexandria, Egypt in 357 and drove out Saint Athanasius and other orthodox Christians. Many were old, many infirm and many, many died of abuse and privations while on the road and in the wilderness. Very few survived to return to their homes in 361 when Julian the Apostate recalled all Christians and then many of those later died in the persecutions of Julian.

Martyrs of Pentecost in Alexandria: An unspecified number of Christian clerics and lay people who, on Pentecost in 338, were rounded up by order of the Arian bishop and emperor Constantius and were either killed, or exiled, for refusing to accept Arian teachings. 339 in Alexandria, Egypt.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Celebrating the Memorial of BL JOSEPH GéRARD O.M.I. – 29 May

Celebrating the Memorial of BL JOSEPH GéRARD O.M.I. – 29 May Priest and Missionary, Apostle to Lesotho (12 March 1831-29 May 1914 aged 83) – Patron of Missionaries.

bl.-joseph-grard-800-400

Joseph Gerard was born in 1831 in Bouxieres-aux-Chenes in the Diocese of Nancy, France.  He joined the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate at the age of 20 and at the age of 22 was sent by St Eugene de Mazenod (https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/?s=St+Eugene+de+Mazenod) as a missionary to Southern Africa, never to see his family or homeland again.   He was ordained a priest in 1854 in Pietermaritzburg and at first served the Oblate mission to the Zulu people, later joining Bishop Allard, the Bishop of Natal, in setting up the first Catholic mission in Lesotho.  With the permission of the great Chief Moshoeshoe they founded Motse-oa-Ma-Jesu (the Village of the Mother of Jesus) thirty two kilometres south of Moshoeshoe’s stronghold of Thaba Bosiu.   (The village which they founded later became Roma, site of the Catholic University College and now the University of Lesotho.)

Joseph Gerard was well respected by Chief Moshoeshoe, particulaly because he remained with the Basotho during the three wars between the Basotho and the Orange Free State.  It is said that it was through Joseph Gerard’s efforts that Chief Moshoeshoe sought the protection of the British at the end of the wars, a decision which resulted in Lesotho becoming a British Protectorate and an Independent country today.

Joseph Gerard’s mission grew slowly and by the end of 1879, when he was already 48 years of age, there were only 700 Catholics in Lesotho.  He persevered, however in prayer, faith and work, remaining in Lesotho as a missionary for the rest of his life.

bl.-joseph-gerard

Early beginnings at the
Village of the Mother Of Jesus

The Oblate mission to the Basotho grew and flourished.  He died on 29th May 1914 at the age of 83, a man greatly revered by the people of Lesotho.  The fact that Lesotho is very largely a Catholic country today can be traced back to those early beginnings at the Village of the Mother of Jesus.

The beatification process commenced under Pope Pius XII on 1 March 1955 and he became titled as a Servant of God while the confirmation of his life of heroic virtue allowed for Pope Paul VI to name him as Venerable on 13 November 1976.  The miracle required for his beatification was investigated and later received validation from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints on 14 March 1986;  a medical board approved it on 3 December 1986 as did theologians on 13 March 1987 and the C.C.S. members on 19 May 1987.   Pope John Paul II approved this miracle on 1 June 1987 and beatified the late priest while on his visit to Lesotho on 15 September 1988.   The current postulator for this cause is the O.M.I. priest Thomas Klosterkamp

bljoseph

 

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 21 May

Thought for the Day – 21 May

“I have a sensitive and excessive heart”
In the personal view that he presented to his spiritual director, on entering the major seminary in 1808, this characteristic was a very good reflection of his personality.   Eugene was a “man of heart”.   He loved passionately, as he himself admitted.   He loved his family. “I am an idolater of my family… I would allow myself to be beaten with an axe for certain of its individuals… I would give my life for them without hesitation” he once wrote.  This tendency of love for his family was equally manifested in behalf of the children of his religious family, the Oblates of Mary Immaculate.   His most ardent desire was to see them love one another as brothers.   This intent was so profound within him that he inscribed it in his spiritual testament.   On his deathbed, May 21, 1861, to a few Oblates by his side awaiting a parting instruction from their venerated father, Bishop de Mazenod repeated three times, as if to be well understood: “Charity, charity, charity”.

This great capacity for love allowed St Eugene to open that loving heart to the grace of God which bore rich fruit in his life.   That required a certain amount of flexibility as well as courage to face the problems every growing group encounters.   We look to saints like Eugene not to borrow their love, courage and zeal but, with God’s grace, to discover our own, always seeking first God’s kingdom (see Matthew 6:33).   And a thought that fills us with hope, our passionate love, may just be the impetus and grace of God which forces us to rush headlong into His work and to convert that love into charity too!

St Eugene Pray for us!

st eugene pray for us 2

ST EUGENE DE MAZENOD - MAY 21

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May

Quote/s of the Day – 21 May

“I had looked for happiness outside of God
but outside of Him I had found only affliction
and disappointment.”

“What more glorious occupation than to act
in everything and for everything only for God,
to love Him above all else,
to love Him all the more,
as one who has loved Him too late.”

what more glorious occupation-st eugene de mazenod

“To love the Church
is to love Jesus Christ
and vice versa.”

“We glorify God in the masterpiece
of His power and love…
it is the Son whom we honour
in the person of His Mother.”

St Eugene de Mazenod – Saint of the Day

to love the church-st eugene de mazenod

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 21 May – May the Lord make you overflow with love

One Minute Reflection – 21 May – The Memorial of St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)

May the Lord make you overflow with love for one another and for all………….1 Thes 3:12

REFLECTION – “I find my happiness in pastoral work.   It is for this that I am a bishop and not to write books, still less to pay court to the great, or to waste my time among the rich.   It is true…that this is not the way to become a cardinal but if one could become a saint, would it not be better still?”…St Eugene de Mazenod (1782-1861)1 thes 3 12 - may the lord make you overflow - i find my happiness in pastoral work - st eugene de mazenod 21 may 2019

 

PRAYER – Loving Father, grant me the grace to strive after perfect love. Help me to bring forth frequents acts of love so that I may grow in this greatest of virtues. St Eugene you overflowed with love, they said your heart was as big as the world, please pray for us all, amen.st eugene de mazenod pray for us 21 may 2019

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saints – 21 May

Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution (Optional Memorial): The 1917 Mexican constitution was pointedly anti-clerical and anti-Church, and its adoption instituted years of violent religious persecution including expulsion of foreign priests, closing of parochial schools, and the murders of several priests and lay leaders who work to minister to the faithful and support religious freedom. 25 of them who died at different times and places but all as a result of this persecution were celebrated together. They each have separate memorials, but are also remembered as a group.

• Saint Agustin Caloca Cortes
• Saint Atilano Cruz Alvarado
• Saint Cristobal Magallanes Jara
• Saint David Galván-Bermúdez
• Saint David Roldán-Lara
• Saint David Uribe-Velasco
• Saint Jenaro Sánchez DelGadillo
• Saint Jesús Méndez-Montoya
• Saint Jose Isabel Flores Varela
• Saint José María Robles Hurtado
• Saint Julio álvarez Mendoza
• Saint Justino Orona Madrigal
• Saint Luis Batiz Sainz
• Saint Manuel Moralez
• Saint Margarito Flores-García
• Saint Mateo Correa-Magallanes
• Saint Miguel de la Mora
• Saint Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
• Saint Pedro Esqueda Ramírez
• Saint Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán
• Saint Roman Adame Rosales
• Saint Sabas Reyes Salazar
• Saint Salvador Lara Puente
• Saint Toribio Romo González
• Saint Tranquilino Ubiarco Robles

Canonized: 21 May 2000 by Pope John Paul II

St Adalric of Bèze
Bl Adilio Daronch
St Ageranus of Bèze
St Ansuinus of Bèze
St Antiochus of Caesarea Philippi
St Bairfhion of Killbarron
St Berard of Bèze
St Collen of Denbighshire
St Donatus of Caesarea
St Eugene de Mazenod
St Eutychius of Mauretania
Bl Franz Jägerstätter
St Genesius of Bèze
St Godric of Finchale
Bl Hemming of Åbo
St Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice
Bl Hyacinth-Marie Cormier
St Isberga of Aire
Bl Jean Mopinot
Bl Lucio del Rio
St Mancio of Évora
Bl Manuel Gómez González
St Nicostratus of Caesarea Philippi
Bl Pietro Parenzo
St Polieuctus of Caesarea
St Polius of Mauretania
St Restituta of Corsica
St Rodron of Bèze
St Secundinus of Cordova
St Secundus of Alexandria
St Serapion the Sindonite
St Sifrard of Bèze
Bl Silao
St Synesius
St Theobald of Vienne
St Theopompus
St Timothy of Mauretania
St Valens of Auxerre
St Vales
St Victorius of Caesarea

Martyrs of Egypt: Profile

Large number of bishops, priests, deacons and lay people banished when the Arian heretics seized the diocese of Alexandria, Egypt in 357 and drove out Saint Athanasius and other orthodox Christians. Many were old, many infirm, and many, many died of abuse and privations while on the road and in the wilderness. Very few survived to return to their homes in 361 when Julian the Apostate recalled all Christians; and then many of those later died in the persecutions of Julian.

Martyrs of Pentecost in Alexandria: An unspecified number of Christian clerics and lay people who, on Pentecost in 338, were rounded up by order of the Arian bishop and emperor Constantius, and were either killed or exiled for refusing to accept Arian teachings. 339 in Alexandria, Egypt

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, GOD is LOVE, ON the SAINTS, QUOTES for CHRIST, QUOTES of the SAINTS

Quote/s of the Day – 1 November – All the Saints!

Quote/s of the Day – 1 November – The Solemnity of All Saints

“Let listening to worldly news
be BITTER FOOD for you
and let the words of
Saintly men
be as combs
filled with honey.”

St Basil the Great (329-379)
Father and Doctor of the Church

“The Saints must be honoured as friends of Christ
and children and heirs of God.
Let us carefully observe the manner of life
of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics
and just men who announced the coming of the Lord.
And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life,
patience under suffering
and perseverance unto death,
so that we may also share,
their crowns of glory.”

St John Damascene (675-749)
Father and Doctor of the Church

“Those in the Catholic Church,
whom some rebuke for praying to Saints
and going on pilgrimages,
do not seek any Saint as their saviour.
Instead, they seek Saints,
as those whom their Saviour loves
and whose intercession and prayer,
for the seeker, He will be content to hear.
For His Own sake,
He would have those He loves honoured.
And when they are thus honoured for His sake,
then, the honour that is given them, for His sake,
overflows especially to Himself.”

St Thomas More 1478-1535) Martyr

“Be often reading the lives of the saints
for inspiration and instruction.”

St Philip Neri (1515-1595)

“God, because of the great love He bears us
and His great desire to see us saved,
has given us, among other means of salvation,
the practice of devotion to the Saints.
It is His will that they,
who are His friends,
should intercede for us
and, by their merits and prayers,
obtain graces for us,
which we ourselves do not deserve.”

St Alphonsus Maria Liguori (1696-1787)
Most Zealous Doctor

“Every so often,
unite oneself interiorly
with the Saintly souls who serve God
and praise Him… with the holy angels
and all the heavenly court …”

St Eugène de Mazenod OMI (1782-1861)

More here:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/11/01/quote-s-of-the-day-1-november-on-the-saints/
AND:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/11/01/quote-s-of-the-day-1-november-the-solemnity-of-all-the-saints/