Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Saint of the Day – 18 June 2018 – St Gregory Barbarigo (1625-1697)

Saint of the Day – 18 June 2018 – St Gregory Barbarigo (1625-1697) Cardinal who served as the Bishop of Bergamo and later as the Bishop of Padua, Canon and Civil lawyer, Vatican prelate, Apostle of Charity and the Sick, Reformer, Teacher – born on 16 September 1625 at Venice, Italy as Gregorio Giovanni Gasparo Barbarigo and died on 18 June 1697 at Padua, Italy of natural causes.   Patronages – Diocese of Bergamo, Diocese of Padua.   His body is incorrupt.Body_of_St._Gregorio_Barbarigo_-_Altar_of_St._Gregorio_Barbarigo_-_Duomo_-_Padua_2016

He was a front-runner in both the 1689 and 1691 papal conclaves for his diplomatic and scholastic nature whereby he distinguished himself.   He was a noted scholar and was an able pastor who displayed careful attention to pastoral initiatives and frequent parish visitations.

St Gregory was born on 16 September 1625 in Venice as the eldest of four children to the nobles Giovanni Francesco Barbarigo (a senator) and Lucrezia Leoni.   His father instructed him in philosophical studies and in mathematics while tutors taught him Latin and Greek;  he also received the rudiments of music.

In 1643 he accompanied the Venetian ambassador Aloise Contarini to Münster for the negotiations to prepare for the Peace of Westphalia which was signed on 24 October 1648.   There he became acquainted with Archbishop Fabio Chigi (the future Pope Alexander VII) – the nuncio to Cologne and a participant in the negotiations.   In July 1648 he returned to Venice and continued his studies in Padua.   In the winter in 1653, he went to Rome to ask the advice of Cardinal Chigi who recommended that he not retire as a hermit but follow the ecclesiastical career and begin obtaining a doctorate in law and theology.   He obtained doctorates in both canon law and civil law, as well as theology, on 25 September 1655 and received his ordination to the priesthood on 21 December 1655.HEADER ST GREGORY BARBARIGO

He left for Rome at in late February 1656 for Chigi – now Pope Alexander VII – initiated him into the papal service.  In 1655 he was given a Canonicate in the cathedral chapter of Padua without the requirement of residence and in 1656 – at the request of the pope – he organised the assistance to the Romans in the Trastevere area who had been stricken with the plague.   He oversaw the care of the mothers and their children and the funerals of the deceased in this work.

On 9 July 1657 the pope appointed him as the newest Bishop of Bergamo (* see note below) and he received his episcopal consecration as such on 29 July 1657.   When he arrived in Bergamo, he proceeded to visit each of the 390 parishes of the diocese.gregorio-barbarigo-2f262a6b-ca7b-488a-bd65-72253bb1af4-resize-750

He was a successful bishop and his fame spread through the ranks so much to the point that his old friend Alexander VII elevated him into the cardinalate on 5 April 1660.   In 1664 he was made the newest Bishop of Padua and upon entrance into his new diocese he strove to model himself upon the example of Saint Charles Borromeo (1538-1584).

He was a strong supporter of the work of the Council of Trent.  He made the seminaries of Padua and of Bergamo larger and added an archive and printing press in Padua.   He celebrated a diocesan synod from 1–3 September 1683 and wrote the “Regulae Studiorum” in 1690 for ecclesial studies  . He also visited all 320 parishes in his diocese.

Cardinal Barbarigo fostered catechetical instruction and he travelled across to each village in his diocese in order to teach and to preach to the people.   His compassion to the poor was well known for he gave his household goods and his clothes to the poor.   He even sold his bed to help them.

 

Barbarigo died after a brief illness on 18 June 1697 in Padua where he was interred in the diocesan cathedral.   His remains were exhumed on 25 May 1725 and found to be incorrupt.

Barbarigo’s Beatification was celebrated under Pope Clement XIII while Pope John XXIII Canonised him in 1960;  the latter Pope held Barbarigo as a great role model and fostered a great devotion to him.

Jun+18+Gregory+Barbarigo+1

*Note:   An unusual feature of diocesan life in Bergamo is that for historical reasons, a number of the parishes in the diocese, even if a minority, celebrate the liturgy not according to the Roman Rite but according to the Ambrosian Rite.   The Ambrosian Rite, also called the Milanese Rite, is a Catholic liturgical Western rite.   The rite is named after Saint Ambrose, a bishop of Milan in the fourth century.   The Ambrosian Rite, which differs from the Roman Rite, is used by some five million Catholics in the greater part of the Archdiocese of Milan, Italy, in some parishes of the Diocese of Como, Bergamo, Novara, Lodi and in about fifty parishes of the Diocese of Lugano, in the Canton Ticino, Switzerland.

Although at various points in its history the distinctive Ambrosian Rite has risked suppression, it survived and was reformed after the Second Vatican Council partly because Blessed Pope Paul VI belonged to the Ambrosian Rite, having previously been Archbishop of Milan.   In the 20th century, it also gained prominence and prestige from the attentions of two other scholarly Archbishops of Milan:  Achille Ratti, later Pope Pius XI and the Blessed Ildefonso Schuster O.S.B. (1880-1954), both of whom had been involved in studies and publications on the rite before their respective appointments.

Differences from the Roman Rite
Some features of the Ambrosian Rite distinguish it from the Roman Rite liturgy.

Mass – the main differences in the Mass are:

The principal celebrant blesses all the readers, not only the deacon.
The Gospel is followed by a short antiphon.
The General Intercessions or “Prayers of the Faithful” immediately follow the homily
The Rite of Peace comes at the beginning of the Liturgy of the Eucharist, before the Offertory (Presentation of the Gifts)
The Creed follows the Offertory, before the Prayer over the Gifts
There are some differences between the First Eucharistic Prayer of the Ambrosian Missal and the Roman Canon, the first in the Roman Missal;  but its Eucharistic Prayers II, III, and IV are the same as in the Roman Rite.   In addition, the Ambrosian Rite has two proper Eucharistic Prayers, used mainly on Easter and Holy Thursday.
The priest breaks the Host and places a piece in the main chalice before the Lord’s Prayer, while an antiphon (the Confractorium) is sung or recited.
The Agnus Dei is not said.
Before the final blessing, the people say three times Kyrie, eleison (Lord have mercy).
The Ambrosian Rite has its own cycle of readings at Mass.
Many of the prayers said by the priest during Mass are peculiar to the Ambrosian Rite, which has a particularly rich variety of prefaces.

Liturgical year – The main differences in the liturgical year are:

Advent has six weeks, not four.
Lent starts four days later than in the Roman Rite, so that Ash Wednesday is postponed to a week later than in the Roman Rite, and Carnival continues until “sabato grasso” (“Fat Saturday” in Italian), corresponding to Shrove Tuesday (called “mardi gras”, i.e. “Fat Tuesday”, in French) in areas where the Roman Rite is used.
On Fridays in Lent, Mass is not celebrated and, with a few exceptions, Communion is not distributed.
Red, not the Roman-Rite green, is the standard colour of vestments from Pentecost to the third Sunday of October and there are other differences in liturgical colours throughout the year.

Other differences are:

The Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office or Breviary) is different in structure and in various features.
The liturgical rites of the Holy Week are quite different.
The rite of funerals is different.
Baptism of infants is done by triple immersion of the head.
The thurible has no top cover, and is swung clockwise before the censing of a person or object.
Ambrosian deacons wear the stole over the dalmatic and not under it.
The Ambrosian cassock, buttoned with only five buttons below the neck, is held with a fascia at the waist, and is worn with a round white collar.
Ambrosian chant is distinct from Gregorian chant.

ambrosian missal - snipambrosian vestments

 

 

 

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints -18 June

St Abraham of Clermont
St Alena of Dilbeek
St Amandus of Bordeaux
St Arcontius of Brioude
St Athenogenes of Pontus
St Calogero of Sicily
St Calogerus of Fragalata
St Calogerus the Anchorite
St Colman mac Mici
St Cyriacus of Malaga
St Demetrius of Fragalata
St Edith of Aylesbury
St Elisabeth of Schönau (1129-1164)
St Elpidius of Brioude
St Equizio of Telese
St Erasmo
St Etherius of Nicomedia
Bl Euphemia of Altenmünster
St Fortunatus the Philosopher
St Gerland of Caltagirone

St Gregory Barbarigo (1625-1697)
About St Gregory:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/06/18/saint-of-the-day-18-june-2018-st-gregory-barbarigo-1625-1697/

St Gregory of Fragalata
St Guy of Baume
St Jerome of Vallumbrosa
St Marcellian
St Marina of Alexandria
St Marina of Bithynia
Bl Marina of Spoleto
St Marcus
Bl Osanna Andreasi OP (1449-1505)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/06/18/saint-of-the-day-18-june-blessed-osanna-andreasi-op-1449-1505/
St Osanna of Northumberland
St Osmanna of Jouarre
St Paula of Malaga
Bl Peter Sanchez

Hermits of Karden:   A father (Felicio) and his two sons (Simplicio and Potentino)who became pilgrim to various European holy places and then hermits at Karden (modern Treis-Karden, Germany).   (Born in Aquitaine (in modern France.  ) Their relics transferred to places in the Eifel region of western Germany at some point prior to 930. They were canonised on 12 August 1908 by Pope Pius X (cultus confirmation).

Martyrs of Ravenna – 4 saints: A group of four Christians martyred together.   We have no details but their names – Crispin, Cruciatus, Emilius and Felix.   They were martyred in Ravenna, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Rome – 3 saints:   Three Christians martyred together . We have no details but their names – Cyriacus, Paul and Thomas. In Rome, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Tripoli – 3 saints:   Three imperial Roman soldiers, at last two of them recent converts, who were imprisoned, tortured and executed for their faith.   Martyrs – Hypatius, Leontius and Theodulus. They were Greek born and they died c135 at Tripoli, Phoenicia (in modern Lebanon).

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 18 June

St Abraham of Clermont
St Alena of Dilbeek
St Amandus of Bordeaux
St Arcontius of Brioude
St Athenogenes of Pontus
St Calogero of Sicily
St Calogerus of Fragalata
St Calogerus the Anchorite
St Colman mac Mici
St Cyriacus of Malaga
St Demetrius of Fragalata
St Edith of Aylesbury
St Elizabeth of Schonau
St Elpidius of Brioude
St Equizio of Telese
St Erasmo
St Etherius of Nicomedia
Bl Euphemia of Altenmünster
St Fortunatus the Philosopher
St Gerland of Caltagirone
St Gregory Barbarigo (1625-1697)
About St Gregory:   https://anastpaul.com/2018/06/18/saint-of-the-day-18-june-2018-st-gregory-barbarigo-1625-1697/

St Gregory of Fragalata
St Guy of Baume
St Jerome of Vallumbrosa
St Marcellian
St Marina of Alexandria
St Marina of Bithynia
Bl Marina of Spoleto
St Mark
Bl Osanna Andreasi OP (1449-1505)
St Osanna of Northumberland
St Osmanna of Jouarre
St Paula of Malaga
Bl Peter Sanchez

Hermits of Karden:  A father (Felicio) and his two sons (Simplicio and Potentino)who became pilgrim to various European holy places and then hermits at Karden (modern Treis-Karden, Germany). (Born in Aquitaine (in modern France) Their relics transferred to places in the Eifel region of western Germany at some point prior to 930. They were canonised on 12 August 1908 by Pope Pius X (cultus confirmation).

Martyrs of Ravenna – 4 sai nts:  A group of four Christians martyred together. We have no details but their names – Crispin, Cruciatus, Emilius and Felix. They were martyred in Ravenna, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Rome – 3 saints: Three Christians martyred together . We have no details but their names – Cyriacus, Paul and Thomas. In Rome, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Tripoli – 3 saints:  Three imperial Roman soldiers, at last two of them recent converts, who were imprisoned, tortured and executed for their faith. Martyrs – Hypatius, Leontius and Theodulus. They were Greek born and they died c135 at Tripoli, Phoenicia (in modern Lebanon).

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 18 June

St Abraham of Clermont
St Alena of Dilbeek
St Amandus of Bordeaux
St Arcontius of Brioude
St Athenogenes of Pontus
St Calogero of Sicily
St Calogerus of Fragalata
St Calogerus the Anchorite
St Colman mac Mici
St Cyriacus of Malaga
St Demetrius of Fragalata
St Edith of Aylesbury
St Elizabeth of Schonau
St Elpidius of Brioude
St Equizio of Telese
St Erasmo
St Etherius of Nicomedia
Bl Euphemia of Altenmünster
St Fortunatus the Philosopher
St Gerland of Caltagirone
St Gregory Barbarigo (1625-1697)
St Gregory of Fragalata
St Guy of Baume
St Jerome of Vallumbrosa
St Marcellian
St Marina of Alexandria
St Marina of Bithynia
Bl Marina of Spoleto
St Mark
Bl Osanna Andreasi
St Osanna of Northumberland
St Osmanna of Jouarre
St Paula of Malaga
Bl Peter Sanchez

Hermits of Karden: A father (Felicio) and his two sons (Simplicio and Potentino)who became pilgrim to various European holy places and then hermits at Karden (modern Treis-Karden, Germany). (Born in Aquitaine (in modern France) Their relics transferred to places in the Eifel region of western Germany at some point prior to 930. They were canonised on 12 August 1908 by Pope Pius X (cultus confirmation).

Martyrs of Ravenna – 4 saints: A group of four Christians martyred together. We have no details but their names – Crispin, Cruciatus, Emilius and Felix. They were martyred in Ravenna, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Rome – 3 saints: Three Christians martyred together . We have no details but their names – Cyriacus, Paul and Thomas. In Rome, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Tripoli – 3 saints: Three imperial Roman soldiers, at last two of them recent converts, who were imprisoned, tortured and executed for their faith. Martyrs – Hypatius, Leontius and Theodulus. They were Greek born and they died c135 at Tripoli, Phoenicia (in modern Lebanon).

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, VATICAN Resources

Saint of the Day – 7 May – St Rose Venerini (1656-1728)

Saint of the Day – 7 May – St Rose Venerini M.P.V. (1656-1728) Religious, Foundress, Teacher, Innovator and Pioneer, Apostle of Charity – born (Rosa Venerini) on 9 February 1656 at Viterbo, Italy and died on 7 May 1728 at Rome, Italy of natural causes.   St Rose was a pioneer in the education of women and girls in 17th-century Italy and the foundress of the Religious Teachers Venerini (Italian: Maestre Pie Venerini), an religious order of women, often simply called the Venerini Sisters.   She was canonised by Pope Benedict XVI on 15 October 2006.Santa_Rosa_Venerini

Rosa Venerini, was born in Viterbo, on 9 February 1656.   Her father, Goffredo, originally from Castelleone di Suasa (Ancona), after having completed his doctorate in medicine at Rome, moved to Viterbo where he practised the medical profession brilliantly in the Grand Hospital.   From his marriage to Marzia Zampichetti, of an ancient family of Viterbo, four children were born:   Domenico, Maria Maddalena, Rosa and Orazio.

Rosa was naturally gifted with intelligence and an uncommon human sensibility.   The education that she received in her family allowed her to develop her many talents of mind and heart, forming her in steadfast Christian principles.   According to her first biographer, Father Girolamo Andreucci, S.I., she made a vow to consecrate her life to God at the age of seven.   During the early years of her youth, she lived through a conflict between the attractions of the world and the promise made to God.   Rosa overcame this crisis with trusting prayer and mortification.

At age twenty, Rosa raised questions about her own future.   The women of her time could choose only two orientations for their live:  marriage or the cloister.   Rosa esteemed both but she felt called to realise another project for the good of the Church and the society of her time.   Urged on by prophetic interior occurrences, she committed much time in suffering and searching before reaching a resolution that was completely innovative.

In the autumn of 1676, on the advice of her father, Rosa entered the Dominican Monastery of St Catherine, with the prospect of fulfilling her vow.   With her Aunt Anna Cecilia beside her, she learned to listen to God in silence and in meditation.   She remained in the monastery for only a few months because the sudden death of her father forced her to return to her suffering mother.   In the years immediately following, Rosa had to bear the burden of serious events for her family:  her brother Domenico died at only twenty-seven years of age;  a few months later her mother died, unable to bear the sorrow.

In the meantime, Maria Maddalena married.   There remained at home only Orazio and Rosa, by now twenty-four years old.   Challenged by the desire to do something great for God, in May of 1684, the Saint began to gather the girls and women of the area in her own home to recite the rosary.  The way in which the girls and women prayed and above all, their conversation before and after the prayer, opened the mind and heart of Rosa to a sad reality:  the woman of the common people was a slave of cultural, moral and spiritual poverty.   She then understood that the Lord was calling her to a higher mission which she gradually identified in the urgent need to dedicate herself to the instruction and Christian formation of young women, not with sporadic encounters but with a school understood in the real and true sense of the word.ST ROSE VENERINI 4

On 30 August 1685, with the approval of the Bishop of Viterbo, Cardinal Urbano Sacchetti and the collaboration of two friends, Gerolama Coluzzelli and Porzia Bacci, Rosa left her father’s home to begin her first school, according to an innovative plan that had matured in prayer and her search for the will of God.   The first objective of the Foundress was to give the girls of the common people a complete Christian formation and prepare them for life in society.   Without great pretence, Rosa opened the first “Public School for Girls in Italy”.   The origins were humble but the significance was prophetic, the human promotion and spiritual uplifting of woman was a reality that did not take long to receive the recognition of the religious and civil authorities.

The initial stages were not easy.   The three Maestre (teachers) had to face the resistance of clergy who considered the teaching of the catechism as their private office.   But the harshest suspicion came from conformists who were scandalised by the boldness of this woman of the upper middle class of Viterbo who had taken to heart the education of ignorant girls.   Rosa faced everything for the love of God and with her characteristic strength, continuing on the path that she had undertaken, by now sure that she was truly following the plan of God.   The fruits proved her to be right.   The same clergy soon recognised the moral improvement that the work of education generated among the girls and mothers.

The validity of this initiative was acknowledged and its fame went beyond the confines of the Diocese.   Cardinal Mark Antonio Barbarigo, Bishop of Montefiascone, understood the genius of the Viterbo project and he called the Saint to his diocese.   The Foundress, always ready to sacrifice herself for the glory of God, responded to the invitation.   From 1692 to 1694, she opened ten schools in Montefiascone and the villages surrounding Lake Bolsena.   The cardinal provided the material means and Rosa made the families aware, trained the teachers and organised the schools.   When she had to return to Viterbo to attend to the strengthening of her first school, Rosa entrusted the schools and the teachers to the direction of a young woman, St Lucia Filippini (1672-1732), in whom she has seen particular gifts of mind, heart and spirit.

After the openings in Viterbo and Montefiascone, other schools were started in Lazio. Rosa reached Rome in 1706 but the first experience in Rome was a real failure which marked her deeply and caused her to wait six long years before regaining the trust of the authorities.   On 8 December 1713, with the help of Abate Degli Atti, a great friend of the Venerini family, Rosa was able to open one of her schools in the centre of Rome at the foot of the Campidoglio.

On 24 October 1716, they received a visit from Pope Clement XI, accompanied by eight Cardinals, who wanted to attend the lessons.   Amazed and pleased, at the end of the morning he addressed these words to the Foundress: Signora Rosa, you are doing that which we cannot do.   We thank you very much because with these schools you will sanctify Rome ”.

ST ROSE VENERINI 3

From that moment on, Governors and Cardinals asked for schools for their areas.   The duties of the Foundress became intense, consisting of travels and hard work interwoven with joys and sacrifices for the formation of new communities.   Wherever a new school sprang up, in a short time a moral improvement could be noted in the youth.

Rosa Venerini died a saintly death in the community of St Mark’s in Rome on the evening of 7 May 1728.   She had opened more than forty schools.   Her remains were entombed in the nearby Church of the Gesù, so loved by her.   In 1952, on the occasion of her Beatification, they were transferred to the chapel of the Generalate in Rome.

We can summarise the charism of Rosa Venerini in a few words.   She lived consumed by two great passions:  passion for God and passion for the salvation of souls.   When she understood that the girls and women of her time needed to be educated and instructed in the truths of the faith and of morality, she spared nothing of time, hard work, struggle and difficulties of every kind, as long as it responded to the call of God.   She knew that the proclamation of the Good News could be received if people were first liberated from the darkness of ignorance and error.   Moreover, she intuited that professional training could give woman a human promotion and affirmation in society.   This project required an educating Community and Rosa, without pretense and well before its time in history, offered to the Church the model of the Apostolic Religious Community.st rosa end note

Rosa did not practice her educational mission only in the school but took every occasion to announce the love of God.   She comforted and cured the sick, raised the spirits of the discouraged, consoled the afflicted, called sinners back to a new life, exhorted to fidelity consecrated souls not observing their call, helped the poor and freed people from every form of moral slavery.

Educate to save became the motto that urged the Maestre Pie Venerini to continue the Work of the Lord intended by their Foundress and radiate the charism of Rosa to the world:  to free from ignorance and evil so that the project of God which every person carries within can be visible.

ST ROSE VENERINI 5

This is the magnificent inheritance that Rosa Venerini left her Daughters.   Wherever the Maestre Pie Venerini strive to live and transmit the apostolic concern of their Mother, in Italy as in other lands, they give preference to the poor.

After having made its contribution to the Italian immigrants to the USA from 1909 and in Switzerland from 1971 to 1985, the Congregation extended its apostolic activity to other lands:  India, Brazil, Cameroon, Romania, Albania, Chile, Venezuela and Nigeria.RoseVenerini

Posted in MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY, SPEAKING of .....

Thought for the day – 19 January – The Memorial of Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, Cardinal-Priest (1835-1906) Saints and Lawyers?

Thought for the day – 19 January – The Memorial of Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, Cardinal-Priest (1835-1906)

Speaking of Saints and Lawyers?

A lawyer was visited by Satan who promised that if he sold his soul to him, he would be wealthy, have a beautiful wife who would never leave him and all his cases would be successes.

The lawyer said “Yeh, but what’ the catch?”

So many ‘official’ saints were Lawyers – I have been trying to work this out, what is the connection between holiness and the mind of the lawyer?   Especially in the light of the general opinion we all have of lawyers, something akin to the second-hand car salesman! In other words, a bit of a lier and a cheat, at the very least, someone who shines and polishes the little bit of truth available to him.   Perhaps it is just this – this ability to grab the bit of truth available and make it grow, make it shine, make it the reason why we must have that car or why the judge must release the prisoner?

So the saintly lawyers, grab the bit of truth and delve deeper and further until they find the whole truth – this must be it!   And in that digging they, of course, find the ONLY truth – Jesus the Christ and His Church!   Then, if they were good lawyers, that natural instinct, to delve, to dig, will continue and in that effort, sanctity is achieved.

Here are some, I could find on a quick search, who kept their eye on heaven:
Blessed Anacleto González Flores
Blessed Angelo Carletti
Blessed Antoine-Frédéric Ozanam
Blessed Antonio Franco
Blessed Augustine Novello
Blessed Bartholomew Longo
Blessed Bernardine of Fossa
Blessed Charles Steeb
Blessed Contardo Ferrini
Blessed Demosthenes Ranzi
Blessed Dermot O’Hurley
Blessed Gennaro Maria Sarnelli
Blessed Giacomo Villa
Blessed Giuseppe Antonio Tovini
Blessed Henry of Segusio
Blessed Humbert of Romans
Blessed Jacopone da Todi
Blessed James the Almsgiver
Blessed Jean of Hainaut
Blessed John of Vercelli
Blessed John Storey
Blessed José Perpiñá Nácher
Blessed Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi
Blessed Manuel Basulto Jiménez
Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre
Blessed Mark Fantucci
Blessed Nazju Falzon
Blessed Paul Burali d’Arezzo
Blessed Paul of Wallachia
Blessed Peter de Geremia
Blessed Pierre de Barellis
Blessed Pietro of Gubbio
Blessed Pope Innocent XI
Blessed William Scott
Saint Alphonsus Maria de Liguori
Saint Amphilochius of Iconium
Saint Andrew Avellino
Saint Aprus of Toul
Saint Bernadine Realino
Saint Bertrand of Aquileia
Saint Charles Borromeo
Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen
Saint Francis de Sales
Saint Germanus of Auxerre
Saint Gregory Barbarigo
Saint Ivo of Kermartin
Saint James of the Marches
Saint Jerome
Saint John Houghton
Saint John of Avila
Saint John of Capistrano
Saint Josemaria Escriva
Saint Liphardus of Orleans
Saint Paulinus of Nola
Saint Philogonius of Antioch
Saint Raymond of Penyafort
Saint Richard of Chichester
Saint Salvius of Albi
Saint Satyrus of Milan
Saint Sylvester Gozzolini
Saint Theophilus the Lawyer
Saint Thomas a Becket
Saint Thomas More
Saint Tryphillius of Leucosia
Saint Turibius of Mogroveio
Venerable Cesare Baronio
Venerable Luis de Trelles y Nogerol

Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre, pray for us that we too shine and polish the truth until we meet you in heaven as saints!blessed marcelo - no 2 pray for us

 

 

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, SAINT of the DAY

Saints and Feasts – 18 June

The Solemnity of Corpus Christi (Most countries today 2017)

St Abraham of Clermont
St Alena of Dilbeek
St Amandus of Bordeaux
St Arcontius of Brioude
St Athenogenes of Pontus
St Calogero of Sicily
St Calogerus of Fragalata
St Calogerus the Anchorite
St Colman mac Mici
St Cyriacus of Malaga
St Demetrius of Fragalata
St Edith of Aylesbury
St Elizabeth of Schonau
St Elpidius of Brioude
St Equizio of Telese
St Erasmo
St Etherius of Nicomedia
Bl Euphemia of Altenmünster
St Fortunatus the Philosopher
St Gerland of Caltagirone
St Gregory Barbarigo
St Gregory of Fragalata
St Guy of Baume
St Jerome of Vallumbrosa
St Marcellian
St Marina of Alexandria
St Marina of Bithynia
Bl Marina of Spoleto
St Mark
Bl Osanna Andreasi
St Osanna of Northumberland
St Osmanna of Jouarre
St Paula of Malaga
Bl Peter Sanchez

Hermits of Karden: A father (Felicio) and his two sons (Simplicio and Potentino)who became pilgrim to various European holy places and then hermits at Karden (modern Treis-Karden, Germany). (Born in Aquitaine (in modern France) Their relics transferred to places in the Eifel region of western Germany at some point prior to 930. They were canonised on 12 August 1908 by Pope Pius X (cultus confirmation)

 

Martyrs of Ravenna – 4 saints: A group of four Christians martyred together. We have no details but their names – Crispin, Cruciatus, Emilius and Felix. They were martyred in Ravenna, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Rome – 3 saints: Three Christians martyred together . We have no details but their names – Cyriacus, Paul and Thomas. In Rome, Italy, date unknown.

Martyrs of Tripoli – 3 saints: Three imperial Roman soldiers, at last two of them recent converts, who were imprisoned, tortured and executed for their faith. Martyrs – Hypatius, Leontius and Theodulus. They were Greek born and they died c135 at Tripoli, Phoenicia (in modern Lebanon).