Posted in MARTYRS, PATRONAGE - A HOLY DEATH & AGAINST A SUDDEN DEATH, PATRONAGE - DOCTORS, / SURGEONS / MIDWIVES., PATRONAGE - EPILEPSY, PATRONAGE - EYES, PATRONAGE - HEADACHES, PATRONAGE - THE SICK, THE INFIRM, ALL ILLNESS, PATRONAGE-INFERTILITY & SAFE CHILDBIRTH, PATRONAGE-STOMACH PAIN, SAINT of the DAY

Saint/s of the Day – 8 August – The Fourteen Holy Helpers.

Saint/s of the Day – 8 August – The Fourteen Holy Helpers.
A group of Saints invoked with special confidence because they have proven themselves efficacious helpers in adversity and difficulties, are known and venerated under the name Fourteen Holy Helpers.

The Notable Martyrs Saints within the Group are:
Acacius, Barbara, Blaise, Christopher, Cyriacus, Catherine of Alexandria, Denis, Erasmus of Formia, Eustace, George, Giles, Margaret of Antioch, Pantaleon and Vitus.

Devotion to these fourteen ,as a group, spread in response to the Black Plague which devastated Europe from 1346 to 1349. Among its symptoms were the tongue turning black, a parched throat, violent headache, fever, and boils on the abdomen. It attacked without warning, robbed its victims of reason and killed within a few hour. Many died without the last Sacraments.

Brigands roamed the streets, people suspected of contagion were attacked, animals died, people starved, whole villages vanished into the grave, social order and family ties broke down and the disease appeared incurable. The pious turned to Heaven, begging the intervention of the Saints, praying to be spared or cured. This group devotion began in Germany–the Diocese of Wurzburg having been renowned for its observance.

Pope Nicholas V attached Indulgences to devotion of the Fourteen Holy Helpers in the 16th century.

Saint Christopher and Saint Giles are nvoked against the plague itself.
Saint Denis is prayed to for relief from headache, Saint Blaise for ills of the throat,
Saint Elmo for abdominal maladies,
Saint Barbara for fever and Saint Vitus against epilepsy.
Saint Pantaleon is the Patron of physicians,
Saint Cyriacus invoked against temptation on the deathbed and Saints Christopher, Barbara and Catherine, for protection against a sudden and unprovided death.
Saint Giles is prayed to for a good Confession and Saint Eustace as healer of family troubles.
Domestic animals were also attacked by the plague and so, Saints George, Elmo, Pantaleon and Vitus are invoked for the protection of these animals.
Saint Margaret of Antioch is the Patron of safe childbirth.

The legends of the Fourteen Holy Helpers are replete with the most glorious examples of heroic firmness and invincible courage in the profession of the Faith, which ought to incite us to imitate their fidelity in the performance of the Christian and social duties. If they, with the aid of God’s grace, achieved such victories, why should not we, by the same aid, be able to accomplish the very little which is desired of us? God rewarded His victorious champions with eternal bliss – the same crown is prepared for us, if we but render ourselves worthy of it. God placed the seal of miracles on the intrepid confession of His Servants and a mind imbued with the spirit of faith, sees nothing extraordinary therein because our Divine Saviour, Himself said, “Amen, amen I say to you, he that believes in Me, the works that I do, he also shall do and greater than these shall he do” (John 14:12). In all the miraculous events wrought in and by the Saints, there appears only the victorious omnipotent Power of Jesus Christ and the living faith, in which His Servants operated in virtue of this power.

The histories of the Saints are called Legends.
This word is derived from the Latin,and signifies something that is to be read, a passage the reading of which is prescribed.
Therefore, the Legends of the Saints are the lives of the holy Martyrs and Confessors of the Faith.
Some of them occur in the Roman Breviary which the Catholic Clergy is obliged to read everyday.

(The corruption of this word has occurred in modern times, giving it a meaning of either “unprovable story or celebrity.”)

A little more about the 14 Holy Helpers and a prayer to them by St Alphonsus Liguori here:  https://anastpaul.com/2018/07/25/thought-for-the-day-25-july-the-memorial-of-st-christopher-died-c-251-one-of-the-fourteen-holy-helpers/

Posted in MARTYRS, PATRONAGE - DOCTORS, / SURGEONS / MIDWIVES., SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 31 October – St Foillan of Fosses (Died 655)

Saint of the Day – 31 October – St Foillan of Fosses (Died 655) Bishop, Martyr, Missionary, Abbot. Born in the 7th Century in Ireland and died by murder on 31 October 655 in the forest near Nivelles, Belgium, Patronages – children’s nurses, dentists, Fosses, Belgium, surgeons, truss makers, Diocese of Mechelen and Tournai., Belgium. Also known as – Faelan, Faillan, Faolan, Feuillien, Foalan, Foelan. Additional Memorial – 5 November in the Diocese of Mechelen and Tournai.

Foillan was one of the numerous Irish missionaries who, in the course of the seventh century, evangelised in Europe, bringing the liturgy and sacred vessels, founding prosperous Monasteries and sharing considerably in the propagation of the Faith in these countries. Foillan played a significant part in Frankish ecclesiastical history, as shown by his share in the direction of Nivelles and by the foundation of the Monastery of Fosses-la-Ville.

Foillan was born in Ireland early in the seventh century and was the brother of Saints Ultan and Fursey, the latter a famous Missionary who preached the Faith to the Irish, the Anglo-Saxons and the Franks. Foillan, probably in company with Ultan, went with his brother Fursey, when the latter, fleeing from his country then devastated by foreign invaders, retired to a lonely islands. Fursey soon went among the Anglo Saxons and built a Monastery at Burgh Castle (Cnoberesburg) in Suffolk, between 634 and 650.

Seized again with the desire for solitude, Fursey left the Monastery in the care of Foillan, who remained at the head of the community and had the happiness of once more seeing his brother Fursey, who, having since gone to the kingdom of the Franks, came to visit him about 650. Soon a disastrous war broke out between Penda, the Mercian Chief and Ana, King of the Eastern Anglo-Saxons. Ana, having been put to flight, the Monastery of Cnoberesburg fell into the hand of the enemies. It was pillaged,and its Abbot, Foillan, barely escaped death. He hastened to ransom the captive Monks, recovered the relics, put the holy books and objects of veneration on board ship and departed for the country of the Franks, where his brother Fursey was buried. He and his companions, were well received at Péronne by Erconwald, Mayor of the Palace. But soon, for some unknown reason, Foillan and his companions left Péronne and went to Nivelles, a Monastery founded by St Ita and St Gertrude, wife and daughter of Duke Pepin I.

Foillan, like so many other Irishmen who went to the Continent in the seventh century, was invested with episcopal dignity, having doubtless been a monastic Bishop at Cnoberesburg. He was, therefore ,of great assistance in the organisation of worship and the holy books and relics, which he brought, were great; treasures for St Ita and St Gertrude. As the Monastery of Nivelles was under Irish discipline, the companions of Foillan were well received and lived, side by side, with the holy women, occupying themselves with the details of worship under the general direction of the Abbess. Through the liberality of Ita, Foillan was enabled to build a Monastery at Fosses, not far from Nivelles, in the Province of Namur.

The Church at Fosses

After the death of Ita in 652, Foillan came one day to Nivelles and sang Mass, on the eve of the feast of St Quentin. The ceremony being finished, he resumed his journey, doubtless undertaken in the interests of his Monastery. In the forest of Senege the Saint and his companions fell into a trap set by bandits who inhabited that solitary place. They were slain, stripped, and their bodies concealed. But they were recovered by St Gertrude and when she had taken some relics of the Saint, his body was borne to the Monastery of Fosses, where it was buried in 655.

It is not surprising, after his death and because of his work in the area, that St Foillan should be honoured and venerated both at Nivelles and Fosses and, to find at Le Roeulx (Belgium) a Monastery bearing his name. As late as the twelfth century the veneration in which he was held, inspired Philippe Le Harvengt, Abbot of Bonne-Espérance, to compose a lengthy biography of the Saint. He is the Patron of Fosses, near Charieroi. In the Diocese of Namur his feast is celebrated on 31 October, in the Dioceses of Mechlin and Tournai on 5 November.

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, PATRONAGE - BACHELORS, PATRONAGE - BREWERS, PATRONAGE - DOCTORS, / SURGEONS / MIDWIVES., PATRONAGE - LAWYERS / NOTARIES, SAINT of the DAY, The APOSTLES & EVANGELISTS

Saint of the Day – 18 October – St Luke the Evangelist

Saint of the Day – 18 October – St Luke the Evangelist

St Luke, the inspired author of the third Gospel and of the Acts of the Apostles, was a native of Antioch in Syria and a physician and one of the early converts from paganism. He accompanied St Paul on a considerable part of his missionary journey.   He was also his companion while in prison at Rome on two different occasions.   His account of these events, contained in the Acts, is first hand history.   His symbol is a Winged Ox anticipated by Ezekiel.    The ox, recognised as the animal of sacrifice, was applied to St Luke because his Gospel emphasises the atonement made by Christ’s sacrifice of Himself on the Cross.   His name means “bringer of light” (= luke).Saint Luke 1407x1409

Luke’s Gospel is, above all, the Gospel of the Merciful Heart of Jesus.   It emphasises the fact that Christ is the salvation of all men, especially of the repentant sinner and of the lowly.   Legend says that Luke painted the Blessed Virgin’s portrait.   It is certainly true that he painted the most beautiful word-picture of Mary ever written.

St Luke came from Antioch, was a practising physician and was one of the first converts to Christianity.   He accompanied St Paul, who converted him, on his missionary journeys and was still with him in Rome when St Paul was in prison awaiting death.   We hear no more of him afterwards and nothing is known of his last years.   The Church venerates him as a Martyr.St+luke+wow web

St Luke’s Gospel is principally concerned with salvation and mercy – in it are preserved some of our Lord’s most moving parables, like those of the lost sheep and the prodigal son.   Dante calls St Luke the “historian of the meekness of Christ.”   It is also St Luke who tells us the greater part of what we know about our Lord’s childhood.bronzino-saint-luke-header

“According to tradition he was an artist, as well as a man of letters and with a soul alive to all the most delicate inspirations, he consecrated his pencil to the holiest use and handed down to us the features of the Mother of God.   It was an illustration worthy of the Gospel which relates to the divine Infancy and it won for the artist a new title to the gratitude of those who never saw Jesus and Mary in the flesh.   Hence St Luke is the patron of Christian art.” …-Excerpted from The Liturgical Year, Abbot Gueranger O.S.B.

St Luke did not personally know our Lord and like St Mark, the author of the second Gospel, he is not included among the apostles.   For this reason the Gospel chosen for their feast is the account of the sending forth of the seventy-two disciples.   According to St Jerome, St Luke died in Achaia (Greece) at the age of 84 and it is unknown whether or not he died a martyr’s death. st luke evangelist.2

His symbol is a Winged Ox anticipated by Ezekiel.    The ox, recognised as the animal of sacrifice, was applied to St Luke because his Gospel emphasises the atonement made by Christ’s sacrifice of Himself on the Cross.  His name means “bringer of light” (= luke).st luke - glass 2

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, PATRONAGE - BACHELORS, PATRONAGE - BREWERS, PATRONAGE - DOCTORS, / SURGEONS / MIDWIVES., PATRONAGE - LAWYERS / NOTARIES, SAINT of the DAY, The APOSTLES & EVANGELISTS

Saint of the Day – St Luke the Evangelist – 18 October

Saint of the Day – St Luke the Evangelist – 18 October – Physician,Ddisciple of St Paul, Evangelist, Author of the Gospel according to Luke and the Acts of the Apostles.   Tradition says he was an Artist too.  He was born at Antioch and Died in c 74 in Greece.   Some say he was Martyred, others that he died of natural causes.  His relics reside at Padua, Italy.   Patronages – artists, bachelors, bookbinders, brewers, butchers, doctors, glass makers, glassworkers, glaziers, gold workers, goldsmiths, lacemakers, lace workers, notaries, painters, physicians, sculptors, stained glass workers, surgeons, 2 cities.   Attributes – Evangelist, Physician, a Bishop, a book or a pen, a man accompanied by a winged ox/winged calf/ox, a man painting an icon of the Blessed Virgin Mary, a brush or a palette (referring to the tradition that he was a painter).   St Luke is one of the Four Evangelists—the four traditionally ascribed authors of the canonical Gospels.   The early Church Fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel according to Luke and the book of Acts of the Apostles, which would mean Luke contributed over a quarter of the text of the New Testament, more than any other author.   Prominent figures in early Christianity such as Jerome and Eusebius later reaffirmed his authorship.   The New Testament mentions Luke briefly a few times and the Pauline epistle to the Colossians refers to him as a physician (from Greek for ‘one who heals’);  thus he is thought to have been both a physician and a disciple of Paul. Christians since the faith’s early years have regarded him as a saint.   He is believed to have been a martyr, reportedly as having been hanged from an olive tree, though some believe otherwise.

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Luke came from the large metropolitan city of Antioch, a part of modern-day Turkey.   In Luke’s lifetime, his native city emerged as an important center of early Christianity. During the future saint’s early years, the city’s port had already become a cultural center, renowned for arts and sciences.   Historians do not know whether Luke came to Christianity from Judaism or paganism, although there are strong suggestions that Luke was a gentile convert.SOD-1018-SaintLuke-790x480

Educated as a physician in the Greek-speaking city, Luke was among the most cultured and cosmopolitan members of the early Church.   Scholars of archeology and ancient literature have ranked him among the top historians of his time period, besides noting the outstanding Greek prose style and technical accuracy of his accounts of Christ’s life and the apostles’ missionary journeys.LUKE!!!luke

Other students of biblical history adduce from Luke’s writings that he was the only evangelist to incorporate the personal testimony of the Blessed Virgin Mary, whose role in Christ’s life emerges most clearly in his gospel.   Tradition credits him with painting several icons of Christ’s mother and one of the sacred portraits ascribed to him – known by the title “Salus Populi Romano – Salvation of the Roman People”– survives to this day in the Basilica of St Mary Major.

Some traditions hold that Luke became a direct disciple of Jesus before His ascension, while others hold that he became a believer only afterward.   After St Paul’s conversion, Luke accompanied him as his personal physician– and, in effect, as a kind of biographer, since the journeys of Paul on which Luke accompanied him occupy a large portion of the Acts of the Apostles.   Luke probably wrote this text, the final narrative portion of the New Testament, in the city of Rome where the account ends.

Luke appears in Acts during Paul’s second journey, remains at Philippi for several years until Paul returns from his third journey, accompanies Paul to Jerusalem and remains near him when he is imprisoned in Caesarea.   During these two years, Luke had time to seek information and interview persons who had known Jesus.   He accompanied Paul on the dangerous journey to Rome where he was a faithful companion   After the martyrdom of St Paul in the year 67, St Luke is said to have preached elsewhere throughout the Mediterranean and possibly died as a martyr.   However, even tradition is unclear on this point.   Fittingly, the evangelist whose travels and erudition could have filled volumes, wrote just enough to proclaim the gospel and apostolic preaching to the world.

Luke’s unique character may best be seen by the emphases of his Gospel, which has been given a number of subtitles:
1) The Gospel of Mercy
2) The Gospel of Universal Salvation
3) The Gospel of the Poor
4) The Gospel of Absolute Renunciation
5) The Gospel of Prayer and the Holy Spirit
6) The Gospel of Joy

luke 3.Евангелист Лука

Posted in PATRONAGE - DOCTORS, / SURGEONS / MIDWIVES., SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 27 July – St Pantaleon (Died c 305) Martyr

Saint of the Day – 27 July – St Pantaleon (Died c 305) – Martyr, Lay Physician, one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers.   He was Martyred in c 305.   Patronages – against consumption or tuberculosis, bachelors, doctors, physicians, midwives, torture victims.   A phial of his blood is preserved at Constantinople and is reported to become liquid and bubble on his feast day.   Some of his relics are enshrined at the church of Saint Denis in Paris, France and others at Lyons, France.

St Pantaleon

According to ltradition he was the son of a rich pagan, Eustorgius of Nicomedia and had been instructed in Christianity by his Christian mother, Eubula.   He became estranged from Christianity for a while as a young man.
He studied medicine and became physician to the Emperor Maximinianus.

He returned to the faith when he encountered a zealous priest, Hermolaus who by prudent exhortation awakened Pantaleon’s conscience to a sense of his guilt, and brought him back into the faith of the Church.   Henceforth he devoted himself ardently to the advancement of the spiritual and temporal welfare of his fellow citizens.  First of all he sought to convert his father, who was still a heathen and had the consolation to see him die a Christian.   As a physician, he was intent on healing his patients both by physical and by spiritual means.   Christians he confirmed in the practice and confession of the Faith” and the heathens he sought to convert.   Many suffering from incurable diseases were restored to health by his prayer and the invocation of the holy name of Jesus.   His presence was everywhere fraught with blessings and consolation.   Upon the death of his father he came into possession of a large fortune, which he divied amongst the poor and the sick.   Envious colleagues denounced him to the emperor during the Diocletian persecution.   The emperor wished to save him and sought to persuade him to apostasy.   Pantaleon, however, openly confessed his faith and as proof that Christ is the true God, he healed a paralytic.   Notwithstanding this, he was condemned to death by the emperor, who regarded the miracle as an exhibition of magic.

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Pantaleon’s flesh was first burned with torches; upon this Christ appeared to all in the form of Hermolaus to strengthen and heal Pantaleon.   The torches were extinguished.   Then a bath of liquid lead was prepared, Christ in the same form stepped into the cauldron with him, the fire went out and the lead became cold.   He was then thrown into the sea but the stone with which he was loaded floated.   He was thrown to the wild beasts but these fawned upon him and could not be forced away until he had blessed them.   He was bound on the wheel but the ropes snapped and the wheel broke.   An attempt was made to behead him but the sword bent and the executioners were converted.   Pantaleon implored Heaven to forgive them, for which reason he also received the name of Panteleemon (the all-compassionate).   It was not until he himself desired it that it was possible to behead him, nailed to a tree.    The priest Hermolaus and the brothers Hermippos and Hermocrates suffered death with him, in the year c 305.