Posted in AUGUSTINIANS OSA, PATRONAGE - PREGNANCY, PATRONAGE - VINTNERS, WINE-FARMERS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 23 December – Bl essed Hartmann OSA (c 1090-1164) Bishop

Saint of the Day – 23 December – Bl essed Hartmann OSA (c 1090-1164) Bishop of Brixen, in South Tyrol, Italy, from his appointment in 1140 until his death, Monk of the Hermits of St Augustine, Reformer of the Clergy, Advisor and Confessor to the Holy Roman Emperor, Leopold I, Miracle-worker. Blessed Hartmann’s name means: “the strong man.” Born in c 1090 at Oberpolling, Bavaria, Germany and died in 1164 of natural causes. Patronages – the City and Diocese of Brixen, in Italy, the Diocese of Bolzano-Bressanone, Italy, of Pregnant women, for a good yield of the vineyards. Also known as – Armand, Artmanno, Althochdt, Harmannu. Hartmann was Beatified on 11 February 1784 by Pope Pius VI.

Hartmann came from the Bavarian nobility. He was educated by Augustinian Canons in the St Nikola Monastery in Passau. He entered the Order , was Ordained to the Priesthood. iN 1122, it was Salzburg’s Archbishop Conrad, who decided to reform his Priests and chose Hartmann to lead a group of Priests under the Rule of Saint Augustine. In 1128, Hartmann was appointed as the Prior of an Augustinian Monastery at Herren-Chiemsee, which position he held until 1133.

The Monasteries flourished under Hartmann’s direction and, in 1136, the collegiate Church in Klosterneuburg was completed and Consecrated. Hartmann was Advisor and Confessor to Emperor Frederick I, whom he tried to serve without betraying his loyalty to the Pope.

Church of the Klosterneuburg Nonastery
Blessed Hartmann (left) and Margrave Leopold III in front of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Christ Child, on the main gate of the Klosterneuburg collegiate Church

In 1140 he was appointed as the Bishop of Brixen, by Pope Innocent II and, as such, received his Episcopal Consecration a short while after. He was installed shortly thereafter and dedicated himself to the reform of Priests in the Diocese, as well as acting as a benefactor to Religious Orders, with a particular emphasis on the introduction of the Order of Saint Benedict into the Diocese.

For Hartmann, a flourishing monastic life was the basis for the restoration of Ecclesiastical discipline and thus, for a religious growth in sanctity. In the conflicts surrounding the Papal election of 1159, Hartmann sided with Pope Alexander III against Emperor Frederick I.

Blessed Hartmann explains the construction plan, to the two co-founders of the Neustift Monastery, Count Reginbert von Säben and his wife Christina. This is the ceiling fresco, n the Neustift collegiate Church, Painted by Matthäus Günther. in 1735-36.

Hartmann himself led an exemplary ascetic life, wearing sackcloth under a plain robe, instead of fullEepiscopal garments. He encouraging discipline in the Clergy and helped the poor and needy. With the assistance of the wealthy Canon Richer, he built the hospice for travellers and pilgrims, on the “Insula Sanctae Crucis” – “the Island of the Holy Cross” – on the site of today’s Seminary – and in 1157, he Consecrated the hospital Chapel.

Painting in the Church in Oberpolling near Passau

We have some information on Hartmann’s miracles but I have found nothing regarding his Patronage of pregnant women. A legend tells how Hartmann stopped on a journey in Longostagno – a district of Ritten near Bozen and refreshed his overheated face in a bowl of water. A woman whose face was badly swollen and bruised, also washed in this water and was instantly relieved of her ailment. Another legend tells that Hartmann hid from robbers in the tower of the Church in Antholz in Pustertal and lost the iron chain with which he flogged himself everyday. When the chain was later found, it unfolded miraculous powers and a fountain sprang up next to the tower,which still flows today and bears his name. The fountain on the Alm near Nova Levante on the Catinaccio Mountains which offered undrinkable water,, he made pure.

Hartmann was already venerated as a Saint during his lifetime. He died of a stroke after taking a too hot bath the day before Christmas Eve .

Statue in the Cathedral in Brixen

Hartmann’s grave was in the Chapel of the hospice he founded on the Island of the Holy Cross in Brixen. It was a popular place of pilgrimage, today the tomb is in the Chapel of the Seminary. Before 1200 a Canon from Neustift wrote his Vita There are also Relics in the collegiate Church in Novacella near Brixen.

Statue in Klosterneuburg Abbey
Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, PATRONAGE - against SORE THROATS, WHOOPING COUGH,, PATRONAGE - FISHERMEN, FISHMONGERS, PATRONAGE - MUSICIANS, PATRONAGE - PREGNANCY, PATRONAGE - THE SICK, THE INFIRM, ALL ILLNESS, SAINT of the DAY, The APOSTLES & EVANGELISTS

Feast of St Andrew, Apostle of Christ, Martyr – 30 November

Feast of St Andrew, Apostle of Christ, Martyr – 30 November

Saint Andrew was the brother of the Apostle Peter and like his brother was born in Bethsaida of Galilee (where the Apostle Philip was also born).   While his brother would eventually overshadow him as the first among the apostles, it was Saint Andrew, a fisherman like Peter, who (according to the Gospel of John) introduced Saint Peter to Christ.saint-andrew-the-apostle-nicolas-tournier (1).jpg

St Andrew was a fisherman who lived in Galilee during the time of Jesus.   He followed John the Baptist and listened to his teachings.   One day, John saw Jesus walking along the road.   John said to his followers, “Behold the Lamb of God.”   He told his followers to go and talk to Jesus.   He wanted them to know that Jesus was the One for whom they had been waiting.   Andrew and another disciple followed Jesus and spent an afternoon with him.   Early the next day Andrew found Simon Peter, his brother and told him, “We have found the Messiah.”

Both men gave up their work as fishermen to become apostles of Jesus.   Andrew was one of the first to be called.   He seemed to take delight in bringing others to Jesus. Saint-Andrew-Anthony-van-Dyck-Oil-Painting.jpg

Andrew was the one who told Jesus about the little boy who had the loaves of bread and the fish, the beginning of a meal that fed more than five thousand people.

It was Andrew and Philip whom the Greeks approached when they wanted to see Jesus. These events indicate that Andrew was a man who was easy to approach, a man you could trust.599px-Artus_Wolffort_-_St_Andrew_-_WGA25857.jpg

Like the other apostles, Andrew became a missionary.   He preached about Jesus in the area around the Black Sea.   Tradition tells us he preached in northern Greece, Turkey and Scythia (now the southern part of Russia).

Tradition places Saint Andrew’s martyrdom on 30 November of the year 60 (during the persecution of Nero) in the Greek city of Patras.   A medieval traditional also holds that, like his brother Peter, he did not regard himself as worthy of being crucified in the same manner as Christ and so he was placed on an X-shaped cross, now known (especially in heraldry and flags) as a Saint Andrew’s Cross.   The Roman governor ordered him bound to the cross rather than nailed, to make the crucifixion and thus Andrew’s agony, last longer.576px-The_Crucifixion_of_Saint_Andrew-Caravaggio_(1607)

Because of his patronage of Constantinople, Saint Andrew’s relics were transferred there around the year 357.   Tradition holds that some relics of Saint Andrew were taken to Scotland in the eighth century, to the place where the town of S. Andrews stands today.  In the wake of the Sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, the remaining relics were brought to the Cathedral of Saint Andrew in Amalfi, Italy.  In 1964, in an attempt to strengthen relations with the Ecumenical Patriarch in Constantinople, Pope Paul VI returned all relics of Saint Andrew that were then in Rome to the Greek Orthodox Church.

Every year since then, the Pope has sent delegates to Constantinople for the feast of Saint Andrew (and, in November 2007, Pope Benedict himself went), just as the Ecumenical Patriarch sends representatives to Rome for the 29 June feast of Saints Peter and Paul (and, in 2008, went himself).   Thus, like his brother Saint Peter, Saint Andrew is in a way a symbol of the striving for Christian unity.st andrew apostle interesting

St Andrew’s Feast takes pride of place in the Liturgical Calendar, for in the Roman Catholic calendar, the liturgical year begins with Advent and the First Sunday of Advent is always the Sunday closest to the Feast of Saint Andrew.  Though Advent can begin as late as 3 December, Saint Andrew’s feast, today is traditionally listed as the first Saint’s day of the liturgical year, even when the First Sunday of Advent falls after it—an honour commensurate with Saint Andrew’s place among the apostles   The tradition of praying the Saint Andrew Christmas Novena 15 times each day from the Feast of Saint Andrew until Christmas flows from this arrangement of the calendar.

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The name “Andrew” is a Greek name meaning “courageous” or “manly.”   St Andrew lived up to his name.

St Andrew, pray that we live up to the name “Christian”!

St Andrew’s Patronages are here:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/11/30/saint-of-the-day-30-november-st-andrew-apostle-of-christ-martyr/St-Andrew vatican statuest andrew apostle statue snip

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, MARTYRS, ON the SAINTS, PAPAL HOMILIES, PATRONAGE - against SORE THROATS, WHOOPING COUGH,, PATRONAGE - FISHERMEN, FISHMONGERS, PATRONAGE - MUSICIANS, PATRONAGE - PREGNANCY, PATRONAGE - THE SICK, THE INFIRM, ALL ILLNESS, SAINT of the DAY, The APOSTLES & EVANGELISTS

Saint of the Day – 30 November – St Andrew, Apostle of Christ, Martyr

Saint of the Day – 30 November – St Andrew, Apostle of Christ, Martyr – Called the “First Called ” – born at Bethsaida, Galilee and was Martyred by crucifixion on a saltire (x-shaped) cross in Patras Greece (around the year 62) – Patronages:  fishermen, fishmongers and rope-makers, textile workers, singers, miners, pregnant women, butchers, farm workers, protection against sore throats, protection against convulsions, protection against fever, protection against whooping cough, Scotland, Barbados, Georgia, Ukraine, Russia, Sicily, Greece, Cyprus, Romania, Patras, Burgundy, San Andrés (Tenerife), Diocese of Parañaque, Telhado, Amalfi, Luqa (Malta) and Prussia; Diocese of Victoria.ANDREW - GLASS maxresdefault

The first striking characteristic of Andrew is his name – it is not Hebrew, as might have been expected but Greek, indicative of a certain cultural openness in his family that cannot be ignored.   We are in Galilee, where the Greek language and culture are quite present.   Andrew comes second in the list of the Twelve, as in Matthew (10: 1-4) and in Luke (6: 13-16); or fourth, as in Mark (3: 13-18) and in the Acts (1: 13-14).   In any case, he certainly enjoyed great prestige within the early Christian communities.   The kinship between Peter and Andrew, as well as the joint call that Jesus addressed to them, are explicitly mentioned in the Gospels.   We read:  “As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen.   And he said to them, “Follow me and I will make you fishers of men'” (Mt 4: 18-19; Mk 1: 16-17).

From the Fourth Gospel we know another important detail:  Andrew had previously been a disciple of John the Baptist and this shows us that he was a man who was searching, who shared in Israel’s hope, who wanted to know better the word of the Lord, the presence of the Lord.   He was truly a man of faith and hope and one day he heard John the Baptist proclaiming Jesus as, “the Lamb of God” (Jn 1: 36), so he was stirred and with another unnamed disciple followed Jesus, the one whom John had called “the Lamb of God”.   The Evangelist says that “they saw where he was staying and they stayed with him that day…” (Jn 1: 37-39).   Thus, Andrew enjoyed precious moments of intimacy with Jesus.   The account continues with one important annotation:  “One of the two who heard John speak and followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother.   He first found his brother Simon and said to him, “We have found the Messiah’ (which means Christ). He brought him to Jesus” (Jn 1: 40-43), straightaway showing an unusual apostolic spirit.

Andrew, then, was the first of the Apostles to be called to follow Jesus.   Exactly for this reason the liturgy of the Byzantine Church honours him with the nickname: “Protokletos”, [protoclete] which means, precisely, “the first called”.Sant_Andrea_S

The Gospel traditions mention Andrew’s name in particular on another three occasions that tell us something more about this man.   The first is that of the multiplication of the loaves in Galilee. On that occasion, it was Andrew who pointed out to Jesus the presence of a young boy who had with him five barley loaves and two fish, not much, he remarked, for the multitudes who had gathered in that place (cf. Jn 6: 8-9). In this case, it is worth highlighting Andrew’s realism.   He noticed the boy, that is, he had already asked the question: “but what good is that for so many?” (ibid) and recognised the insufficiency of his minimal resources.   Jesus, however, knew how to make them sufficient for the multitude of people who had come to hear Him.

The second occasion was at Jerusalem.   As He left the city, a disciple drew Jesus’ attention to the sight of the massive walls that supported the Temple.   The Teacher’s response was surprising:  He said that of those walls not one stone would be left upon another.   Then Andrew, together with Peter, James and John, questionedHhim: “Tell us, when will this be, and what will be the sign when these things are all to be accomplished?” (Mk 13: 1-4). In answer to this question Jesus gave an important discourse on the destruction of Jerusalem and on the end of the world, in which He asked His disciples to be wise in interpreting the signs of the times and to be constantly on their guard.   From this event we can deduce that we should not be afraid to ask Jesus questions but at the same time that we must be ready to accept even the surprising and difficult teachings that He offers us.andrew snip

Lastly, a third initiative of Andrew is recorded in the Gospels:  the scene is still Jerusalem, shortly before the Passion.   For the Feast of the Passover, John recounts, some Greeks had come to the city, probably proselytes or God-fearing men who had come up to worship the God of Israel at the Passover Feast.   Andrew and Philip, the two Apostles with Greek names, served as interpreters and mediators of this small group of Greeks with Jesus.   The Lord’s answer to their question – as so often in John’s Gospel – appears enigmatic but precisely in this way proves full of meaning.   Jesus said to the two disciples and, through them, to the Greek world:  “The hour has come for the Son of man to be glorified.   I solemnly assure you, unless a grain of wheat falls to the earth and dies, it remains just a grain of wheat but if it dies, it produces much fruit” (12: 23-24). Jesus wants to say:  Yes, my meeting with the Greeks will take place but not as a simple, brief conversation between myself and a few others, motivated above all by curiosity.   The hour of my glorification will come with my death, which can be compared with the falling into the earth of a grain of wheat.   My death on the Cross will bring forth great fruitfulness, in the Resurrection the “dead grain of wheat” – a symbol of myself crucified – will become the bread of life for the world, it will be a light for the peoples and cultures. Yes, the encounter with the Greek soul, with the Greek world, will be achieved in that profundity to which the grain of wheat refers, which attracts to itself the forces of heaven and earth and becomes bread. In other words, Jesus was prophesying about the Church of the Greeks, the Church of the pagans, the Church of the world, as a fruit of His Pasch.

Some very ancient traditions not only see Andrew, who communicated these words to the Greeks, as the interpreter of some Greeks at the meeting with Jesus recalled here but consider him the Apostle to the Greeks in the years subsequent to Pentecost.   They enable us to know that for the rest of his life he was the preacher and interpreter of Jesus for the Greek world.ANDREW ICON

Peter, his brother, travelled from Jerusalem through Antioch and reached Rome to exercise his universal mission, Andrew, instead, was the Apostle of the Greek world.   So it is that in life and in death they appear as true brothers – a brotherhood that is symbolically expressed in the special reciprocal relations of the See of Rome and of Constantinople, which are truly Sister Churches.

A later tradition, as has been mentioned, tells of Andrew’s death at Patras, where he too suffered the torture of crucifixion.   At that supreme moment, however, like his brother Peter, he asked to be nailed to a cross different from the Cross of Jesus.   In his case it was a diagonal or X-shaped cross, which has thus come to be known as “St Andrew’s cross”….Pope Benedict XVI – 14 June 2006

Mattia_Preti_-_The_crucifixion_of_St_Andrew_-_Google_Art_Project-Public-Domain-Image

Andrew is the patron saint of several countries and cities and is the patron saint of Prussia and of the Order of the Golden Fleece.  He is considered the founder and the first bishop of the Church of Byzantium and is consequently the patron saint of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.   The flag of Scotland (and consequently the Union Flag and those of some of the former colonies of the British Empire) feature Saint Andrew’s saltire cross. The saltire is also the flag of Tenerife, the former flag of Galicia and the Russian Navy Ensign.

The feast of Andrew is observed on 30 November in both the Eastern and Western churches and is the national day of Scotland.   In the traditional liturgical books of the Catholic Church, the feast of Saint Andrew is the first feast day in the Proper of Saints.VATICAN - ANDREW STATUE -640px-Saint_Andreas