Posted in MARIAN TITLES, MIRACLES, SAINT of the DAY

Our Lady of Lourdes and Memorials of the Saints – 11 February

Our Lady of Lourdes (11 February and 16 July of 1858) – (Optional Memorial)
Our Lady of Lourdes:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/11/the-memorial-of-the-apparitions-of-our-lady-of-lourdes-our-lady-of-the-immaculate-conception-and-the-26th-world-day-of-prayer-for-the-sick/

In 1858, there lived in the village of Lourdes, a little peasant girl, Bernadette Soubirous, 14 years old, uneducated, simple, poor, good. On 11 February, she was sent with two more girls to collect wood. They walked to the Rock of Massabielle, where the two companions crossed a mountain stream; while Bernadette was removing her shoes to follow them, she became conscious of a ravishing beautiful Lady, standing in the hollow of the rock, looking at her. Bernadette fell involuntarily upon her knees, gazing enraptured at the lovely Lady, who smiled lovingly at Bernadette and then disappeared.
The mysterious Lady from heaven appeared in all, eighteen times to the little girl and among other things told her to drink the water from a mysterious fountain which was not yet observed. Bernadette scratched in the sand at a spot indicated and water began to trickle through the earth; after a few days there gushed forth every day 27,000 gallons of pure, clear spring water and this water flows still.

Bernadette was asked by Our Lady of Lourdes, who always showed her a sweet heavenly courtesy, to request the Priest to have a Church built on the spot, that processions should be made to the grotto, that people should drink of the water. The main emphasis of her message was that the faithful should visit the grotto in order to do penance for their sins and for those of the whole world.
In answer to Bernadette’s inquiry, “Who are you?” the Lady answered, “I am the Immaculate Conception.”

The apparitions appeared for the last time on 16 July 1858. Bernadette never again had the supreme privilege of seeing and visiting with Our Lady. Later, Bernadette became a nun at Nevers and there spent the rest of her life. Through her, “Lourdes was destined to become a focus of faith and mercy; thousands of souls were to flock thither to increase their piety, to borrow new energy and resolution. Suffering and charity were to join hands under the eyes of the Divine Mother. Miracles were to be never-ceasing.”
Four years after, the Bishop declared, upon an exhaustive and scrupulous investigation, to the faithful, that they are “justified in believing the reality of the apparitions.”
In 1873, a Basilica was built on top of the rock and in 1883 another Church was built below and in front of the rock. From 1867 when records began to be kept until 1908, about 5,000,000 pilgrims had visited the grotto; now about 1,000,000 people visit Lourdes every year. Although Our Lady never at any time promised that pilgrims who visited the grotto would be healed of their physical ills, remarkable cures began at once and have continued ever since. Many of them are of such a character that they can be ascribed only to supernatural power.

There is no doubt that the cures are miraculous because every possible natural cause has been proved false. There is no chemical composition in the water to make it have curative properties. It has been claimed that the cures might be due to suggestion but Bernheim, head of the famous school of Nancy, says that although suggestion has a chance of success in certain functional diseases, it requires the co-operation of time. Suggestion cures slowly and progressively, while complete cures at Lourdes are instantaneous, the supreme Life Giver Himself is responsible for the many cures witnessed at this shrine of the Immaculate Conception and He chose a simple peasant to reveal to the world the love He bears all mankind, as the adopted children of His Blessed Mother.
Bernadette died in 1879 at the age of 35 and was later Canonised. The body of the blessed Saint can still be seen in its glass coffin, intact and incorrupt, looking as its photographs show, like a young woman asleep. The chair at which she prayed, the altar where she received her First Holy Communion, the bed in which she slept, the room in which she lived – all can be seen at Lourdes.
Lourdes is one of the greatest Marian shrines in the world. Here, praying to Our Lady of Lourdes, one may obtain refreshment, courage, energy and inspiration to continue the age-old struggle of the great Catholic Faith against the forces of darkness and disintegration. This great shrine, all its miracles and the streams of grace that are poured into the world through Our Lady of Lourdes, were made possible, through the faithfulness and the sanctity of a little peasant girl. Amen Our Lady of Lourdes, pray for us, St Bernadette, pray for us!


29th World Day of the Sick +2021

St Ampelius of Africa
St Ardanus of Tournus
Bl Bartholomew of Olmedo
St Caedmon (Died c 680)
Biography of St Caedmon
:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/02/11/saint-of-the-day-11-february-st-caedmon-died-c-680/

St Calocerus of Ravenna
St Castrensis of Capua
St Dativus the Senator
Bl Elizabeth Salviati
St Etchen of Clonfad
St Eutropius of Adrianopolis
St Felix the Senator
St Gobnata
St Pope Gregory II (669-731)
About “The Defender of Icons”
https://anastpaul.com/2020/02/11/saint-of-the-day-11-february-saint-pope-gregory-ii-669-731-defender-of-icons/
Bl Gaudencia Benavides Herrero
St Helwisa
St Jonas of Muchon
St Lazarus of Milan (Died 449) Bishop

St Lucius of Adrianople
St Pope Paschal I
St Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
St Saturninus of Africa
St Secundus of Puglia
St Severinus of Agaunum
St Soter of Rome
St Theodora the Empress
Bl Tobias Francisco Borrás Román

Guardians of the Holy Scriptures: Also known as –
• Anonymous Martyrs in Africa
• Martyrs of Africa
• Martyrs of Numidia
• Martyrs of the Holy Books
A large number of Christians tortured and murdered in Numidia (part of modern Algeria) during the persecutions of Diocletian, but whose names and individual stories have not survived. They were ordered to surrender their sacred books to be burned. They refused. Martyrs. c 303 in Numidia.

Martyrs of Africa – 5 saints: A group of five Christians who were martyred together; we know nothing else but the names of four of them – Cyriacus, Oecominius, Peleonicus and Zoticus.

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY, WORLD DAYS of PRAYER, YouTube VIDEOS

Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes, 28th World Day of the Sick +2020 and Memorials of the Saints – 11 February

Our Lady of Lourdes (11 February and 16 July of 1858) – (Optional Memorial)
Our Lady of Lourdes:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/11/the-memorial-of-the-apparitions-of-our-lady-of-lourdes-our-lady-of-the-immaculate-conception-and-the-26th-world-day-of-prayer-for-the-sick/

28th World Day of the Sick +2020
and the 7th Anniversary of the Resignation of Pope Benedict XVI (his health was the major cause of his resignation)

St Ampelius of Africa
St Ardanus of Tournus
Bl Bartholomew of Olmedo
St Caedmon (Died c 680)
Biography of St Caedmon:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/02/11/saint-of-the-day-11-february-st-caedmon-died-c-680/

St Calocerus of Ravenna
St Castrensis of Capua
St Dativus the Senator
Bl Elizabeth Salviati
St Etchen of Clonfad
St Eutropius of Adrianopolis
St Felix the Senator
St Gobnata
St Pope Gregory II (669-731)
Bl Gaudencia Benavides Herrero
St Helwisa
St Jonas of Muchon
St Lucius of Adrianople
St Pope Paschal I
St Pedro de Jesús Maldonado-Lucero
St Saturninus of Africa
St Secundus of Puglia
St Severinus of Agaunum
St Soter of Rome
St Theodora the Empress
Bl Tobias Francisco Borrás Román

Guardians of the Holy Scriptures:   Also known as –
• Anonymous Martyrs in Africa
• Martyrs of Africa
• Martyrs of Numidia
• Martyrs of the Holy Books
A large number of Christians tortured and murdered in Numidia (part of modern Algeria) during the persecutions of Diocletian, but whose names and individual stories have not survived.   They were ordered to surrender their sacred books to be burned. They refused. Martyrs. c 303 in Numidia.

Martyrs of Africa – 5 saints:   A group of five Christians who were martyred together; we know nothing else but the names of four of them – Cyriacus, Oecominius, Peleonicus and Zoticus.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 17 November – Saint Hilda of Whitby (c 614–680)

Saint of the Day – 17 November – Saint Hilda of Whitby (c 614–680) Abbess, Apostle of Charity, teacher, administrator and advisor, spiritual director, reformer – born in c 614 at Northumbria, England and died in 680 of natural causes – also known as St Hild.   St Hilda was the founding abbess of the monastery at Whitby, which was chosen as the venue for the Synod of Whitby.   An important figure in the Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England, she was abbess at several monasteries and recognised for the wisdom that drew kings to her for advice.   Patronages – learning and culture, poetry.st hilda of whitby snip header

The source of information about Hilda is the Ecclesiastical History of the English People by St Bede the Venerable (673-735) Doctor of the Church, in 731, who was born approximately eight years before her death.   He documented much of the Christian conversion of the Anglo-Saxons.

According to Bede, Hilda was born in 614 into the Deiran royal household.   She was the second daughter of Hereric, nephew of Edwin, King of Deira and his wife, Breguswīþ. When Hilda was still an infant, her father was poisoned while in exile at the court of the Brittonic king of Elmet in what is now West Yorkshire.   In 616, Edwin killed Aethefrith, the son of Æthelric of Bernicia, in battle.   He created the Kingdom of Northumbria and took its throne. Hilda was brought up at King Edwin’s court.

In 625, the widowed Edwin married the Christian princess Æthelburh of Kent, daughter of King Æthelberht of Kent and the Merovingian princess Bertha of Kent.   As part of the marriage contract, Aethelburh was allowed to continue her Roman Christian worship and was accompanied to Northumbria with her chaplain, St Paulinus of York, a Roman monk sent to England in 601 to assist Augustine of Canterbury.   Augustine’s mission in England was based in Kent and is referred to as the Gregorian mission after the pope who sent him.   As queen, Æthelburh continued to practice her Christianity and no doubt influenced her husband’s thinking as her mother Bertha had influenced her father.

In 627 King Edwin was Baptised on Easter Day, 12 April, along with his entire court, which included the 13-year-old Hilda, in a small wooden church hastily constructed for the occasion near the site of the present York Minster.

In 633 Northumbria was overrun by the neighbouring pagan King of Mercia, at which time King Edwin fell in battle.  St Paulinus accompanied Hilda and Queen Æthelburh and her companions to the Queen’s home in Kent.   Queen Æthelburh founded a convent at Lyminge and it is assumed that Hilda remained with the Queen-Abbess.

Hilda’s elder sister, Hereswith, married Ethelric, brother of King Anna of East Anglia, who with all of his daughters became renowned for their Christian virtues.   Later, Hereswith became a nun at Chelles Abbey in Gaul (modern France).   Bede resumes Hilda’s story at a point when she was about to join her widowed sister at Chelles Abbey. At the age of 33, Hilda decided instead to answer the call of Bishop St Aidan of Lindisfarne and returned to Northumbria to live as a nun.st hilda of whitby.jpg

Hilda’s original convent is not known except that it was on the north bank of the River Wear.   Here, with a few companions, she learned the traditions of Celtic monasticism, which Bishop Aidan brought from Iona.   After a year Aidan appointed Hilda as the second Abbess of Hartlepool Abbey.   No trace remains of this abbey but its monastic cemetery has been found near the present St Hilda’s Church, Hartlepool.

In 657 Hilda became the founding abbess of Whitby Abbey, then known as Streoneshalh, she remained there until her death.   Archaeological evidence shows that her monastery was in the Celtic style, with its members living in small houses, each for two or three people.   The tradition in double monasteries, such as Hartlepool and Whitby, was that men and women lived separately but worshipped together in church.   The exact location and size of the church associated with this monastery is unknown.

whitby abbey st hilda.jpg
Whitby Abbey ruins

Bede states that the original ideals of monasticism were maintained strictly in Hilda’s abbey.   All property and goods were held in common, Christian virtues were exercised, especially peace and charity.   Everyone had to study the Bible and do good works.

Five men from this monastery later became bishops.   Two, John of Beverley, Bishop of Hexham and Wilfrid, Bishop of York, were Canonised for their service to the Church at a critical period in its fight against paganism.

Bede describes Hilda as a woman of great energy, who was a skilled administrator and teacher.   As a landowner she had many in her employ to care for sheep and cattle, farmin, and woodcutting.   She gained such a reputation for wisdom that kings and princes sought her advice.   However, she also had a concern for ordinary folk such as St Cædmon (memorial 11 February).   He was a herder at the monastery, who was inspired in a dream to sing verses in praise of God.   Hilda recognised his gift and encouraged him to develop it.   Bede writes, “All who knew her called her mother because of her outstanding devotion and grace”.   Read St Caedmon’s beautiful story and Hymn here:  https://anastpaul.com/2019/02/11/saint-of-the-day-11-february-st-caedmon-died-c-680/

st hilda and st caedmon
St Hilda and St Caedmon

The prestige of Whitby is reflected in the fact that King Oswiu of Northumberland chose Hilda’s monastery as the venue for the Synod of Whitby, the first synod of the Church in his kingdom.   He invited churchmen from as far away as Wessex to attend the synod. Most of those present, including Hilda, accepted the King’s decision to adopt the method of calculating Easter currently used in Rome, establishing Roman practice as the norm in Northumbria.   The monks from Lindisfarne, who would not accept this, withdrew to Iona and later to Ireland.

Hilda suffered from a fever for the last seven years of her life but she continued to work until her death on 17 November 680, at what was then the advanced age of sixty-six.   In her last year she set up another monastery, fourteen miles from Whitby, at Hackness.   She died after receiving viaticum and her legend holds that at the moment of her death the bells of the monastery of Hackness tolled.   A nun there named Begu claimed to have witnessed Hilda’s soul being borne to heaven by angels.st hilda of whitby artwork

A local legend says that when sea birds fly over the abbey they dip their wings in honour of Saint Hilda.   Another legend tells of a plague of snakes which Hilda turned to stone, supposedly explaining the presence of ammonite fossils on the shore;  heads were carved onto these ‘petrified snakes’ to honour this legend.   In fact, the ammonite genus Hildoceras takes its scientific name from St Hilda.   It was not unknown for local “artisans” to carve snakes’ heads onto ammonites and sell these “relics” as proof of her miracle.   The coat of arms of nearby Whitby includes three such ‘snakestones’ and depictions of ammonites appear in the shield of the University of Durham’s College of St Hild and St Bede.   A carved ammonite stone is set into the wall by the entrance to the former chapel of St Hild’s College, Durham, which later became part of the College of St Hild and St Bede.

St_Hilda_memorial_ammonites.jpg
St Hilda monument detail in Whitby. Note ammonites at feet.

St Hilda was never formally Canonised as her life is pre-congregation but the veneration of St Hilda from an early period is attested by the inclusion of her name in the calendar of St Willibrord, written at the beginning of the 8th century.   According to one tradition, her relics were translated to Glastonbury by King Edmund, another tradition holds that St Edmund brought her relics to Gloucester.saint-hilda-of-whitby-marchela-dimitrova

Posted in MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN TITLES, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Quote/s of the Day – 11 February

Quote/s of the Day – 11 February – Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes and the 27th World Day of Prayer for the Sick and the Memorial of St Caedmon (Died c 680)

“I am the Immaculate Conception.”

Our Lady of Lourdes to St Bernadette
25 March 1858i am the imm conception 11 feb 2019.jpg

Let us now praise
the Guardian of the Kingdom of Heaven
and the might of the Creator
and the thought of His Mind,
glorious Father of men,
for He, Lord Eternal,
did frame the beginning
of every marvellous thing.
He first made the heavens
as a roof for the children of men,
God, the Creator!
Then the mid-earth did the eternal Lord,
the Guardian of men,
therewith provide and earth for men,
the Lord God Almighty!

Saint Caedmon

“Hymn of Creation” by St Caedmon, the hymn he learned in his visionhymn of creation by st caedmon 11 feb 2019.jpg