Posted in CHRIST, the WAY,TRUTH,LIFE, DOCTORS of the Church, DOMINICAN OP, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on CHARITY, QUOTES on FREE WILL, QUOTES on HAPPINESS, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on VIRTUE, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 13 February – ‘No-one listens to his own heart …’

Quote/s of the Day – 13 February – the Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)

“Happiness is secured through virtue,
it is a good attained by man’s own will.”

St Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)
Angelic Doctor

happiness is secured through virtue - st thomas aquinas 13 feb 2020

Meeting a vagabond upon the road who feigned sickness and poverty, Blessed Jordan gave him one of his tunics, which the fellow at once carried straight to a tavern for drink. The brethren, seeing this done, taunted him with his simplicity:

‘There now, Master, see how wisely you have bestowed your tunic.’

‘I did so,’ said he,
‘because I believed him to be in want,
through sickness and poverty
and it seemed, at the moment,
to be a charity to help him.
Still, I reckon it better, to have parted
with my tunic than with charity.’

Blessed Jordan of Saxony (1190-1237)

it is better to have parted with my tunic than with charity - bl jordan of saxony 13 feb 2020

The Heart of Christ

This Heart lives on service.
It does not seek to glorify itself but the Father alone.
It does not speak of its love.
It performs it’s service so unobtrusively,
that it is almost forgotten, as we forget our heart under the stress of our affairs.
We think that life lives of itself.
No-one listens to his own heart, not even for a second —
his heart, that bestows life, hour after hour on him.
We have grown used to the slight tremor in our being,
to the eternal beating of the waves that from within us,
dash on the shore of consciousness.
We accept it as we do our destiny, or nature, or the course of things.
We have grown used to love.
And we no longer hear the tapping finger, that knocks day and night at the gate of our soul, we no longer hear this question, this request to enter.

Hans Cardinal Urs von Balthasar (1905-1988)

~From Heart of the World

we no longer hear this tapping finger - hans urs von balthasar 13 feb 2020

Posted in CARMELITES, DOMINICAN OP, SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 13 February

St Adolphus of Osnabruk
St Aimo of Meda
Blessed Archangela Girlani O CARM (1460-1494)
Bl Beatrix of Ornacieux
St Benignus of Todi
Bl Berengar of Assisi
St Castor of Karden
Blessed Christine of Spoleto OSA (1435-1458)
About Blessed Christine:  https://anastpaul.com/2019/02/13/saint-of-the-day-13-february-blessed-christine-of-spoleto-osa-1435-1458/
St Dyfnog
St Ermenilda of Ely
Bl Eustochium of Padua
St Fulcran of Lodève
St Fusca of Ravenna
St Gilbert of Meaux
St Gosbert of Osnabruck
St Guimérra of Carcassone
St Huno
Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/saint-of-the-day-13-february-blessed-jordan-of-saxony-o-p-1190-1237/

St Julian of Lyon
St Lucinus of Angers
St Marice
St Martinian the Hermit
St Maura of Ravenna
St Modomnoc
St Paulus Lio Hanzuo
St Peter I of Vercelli
St Phaolô Lê Van Loc
St Stephen of Lyons
St Stephen of Rieti

Posted in CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN PRAYERS, MARIAN QUOTES, MARIAN REFLECTIONS, MARIAN TITLES, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, QUEENSHIP of MARY, SAINT of the DAY

Our Morning Offring – 22 August – Hail Holy Queen!

Our Morning Offring – 22 August – Celebrating the Queenship of Mary

Salve Regina
Hail Holy Queen

Hail, holy Queen, Mother of Mercy
Hail our life, our sweetness and our hope.
To thee do we cry,
Poor banished children of Eve,
To thee do we send up our sighs,
Mourning and weeping in this vale of tears.
Turn then, most gracious advocate,
Thine eyes of mercy toward us
And after this our exile,
Show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

℣ Pray for us, O holy Mother of God,
℟ that we may be made worthy
of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray:

Almighty, everlasting God,
who by the co-operation of the Holy Spirit
didst prepare the body and soul
of the glorious Virgin-Mother Mary
to become a dwelling-place fit for Thy Son,
grant we pray,
that as we rejoice in her commemoration,
so by her fervent intercession,
we may be delivered from present evils
and from everlasting death.
Through the same Christ our Lord.
Amensalve regina hail holy queen 22 aug 2019.jpg

The Hail Holy Queen or Salve Regina is a choral anthem going back to the eleventh century. Since the thirteenth century it is the last evening chant in many religious communities.   The authorship is not clearly defined.   The Salve is first mentioned in a meditation by Anselm II, Bishop of Lucca, 1073-86 (PL 184, 1078-98) and (erroneously) to Hermannus Contractus (1013-54) of Reichenau.
The “Hail, Holy Queen” is a salutation deprecatonia, a greeting of petition and intercession.   Mary is called mother of mercy because Christ her Son, is the incarnation of God’s love and mercy.   Giving us Christ, she gave us, sinful humans, the life and hope we need (as baptised children of Eve) to survive in this vale of tears.   This antiphon is not part of the rosary but represents the same spirit.   It is part of the official prayer of the Church (Liturgy of the Hours: Vespers and/or Compline) and thus is even more precious than the rosary.   Sung, it becomes a wonderful expression of our spiritual intimacy with Mary.

It is interesting that it was a Domenican (like today’s Saint Giacomo Bianconi), Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237) who initiated the custom of singing the Salve Regina in procession each night after Compline in the Dominican Order, to ask Our Lady’s protection of the brothers against temptations from the devil.   This is a custom still practised by Dominicans throughout the world and by our community each night.

Posted in CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, DOMINICAN OP, MARIAN DEVOTIONS, MARIAN PRAYERS, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, YouTube VIDEOS

Thought for the Day – 13 February – Friendship with Christ

Thought for the Day – 13 February – the Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)

We know little of Jordan’s life before he came into contact with the famous Dominican Reginald of Orleans, a contemporary of St Dominic himself.   Jordan was a successful young student at the University of Paris, already known for the unembarrassed witness of his holy life, when he first heard Reginald preach and met the Dominicans in Paris. God used this contact with the friars to enable Jordan to discern his own call to the Order and once he entered, he gave all he had.   Jordan’s spiritual and practical gifts were recognised immediately and when he had worn the habit only two months he was chosen as a delegate to the Dominican general chapter in Bologna, Italy.   The following year Jordan was elected a provincial superior and when St Dominic died, Jordan succeeded him as the master general of the entire Order.   The Order was only six years old!   It developed rapidly under his leadership, however, growing both in membership and influence throughout Europe.   Jordan was able to carry out the dream which St Dominic had only begun before his death.

Even this brief sketch could make us suspicious, that perhaps Jordan was simply a brilliant young man with leadership skills, that enabled him to rise quickly in his chosen career, at the same time winning success for the Order.   Closer consideration, however, gives us deeper insight into Jordan’s success.   Youthful himself, he had a tremendous respect for the young and their desire to give themselves to something great.   In his own restlessness to give himself, he had obviously come face to face with the restless love of Christ Himself and he had surrendered to it.   Jesus was real to Jordan, a Friend whom he’d come to know and love deeply in his life of prayer.   Jordan understood the restless hunger of the world around him and he couldn’t rest, until that world would come to know this same Friend.   It was this selfless love for Jesus Christ (the kind which St Thomas calls the love of friendship) which gave Jordan the drive to preach, to spend his time with the young, to pour himself out in the building tasks required in a growing religious order.   We are told that he added four new provinces, gained teaching positions for the friars at the University of Paris and established the first general house of studies of the Order.   Jordan also served as spiritual director to many, among them a young Italian noblewoman named Blessed Diana d’Andalo (1201–1236) (who became a Dominican nun).   In the midst of all of this, he found time to write a number of books, including a life of St Dominic (whom he knew personally and loved deeply).

Men of his day responded by the hundreds, to Jordan’s zeal for Christ, some of them mere youths and others established professionals who felt the call of God through Jordan’s words and example.   They were drawn to a life of holiness by this Dominican with a gift of preaching, who lived what he preached with such obvious joy.   It was Jordan who initiated the custom of singing the Salve Regina in procession each night after Compline, to ask Our Lady’s protection of the brothers against temptations from the devil.   This is a custom still practised by Dominicans throughout the world and by our community each night.

Hail, holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,
Hail our life, our sweetness and our hope.
To thee do we cry,
Poor banished children of Eve;
To thee do we send up our sighs,
Mourning and weeping in this valley of tears.
Turn then, most gracious advocate,
Thine eyes of mercy toward us;
And after this our exile,
Show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving,
O sweet Virgin Mary.

℣ Pray for us, O holy Mother of God,
℟ that we may be made worthy
of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray:
Almighty, everlasting God,
who by the co-operation of the Holy Spirit
didst prepare the body and soul
of the glorious Virgin-Mother Mary
to become a dwelling-place fit for Thy Son,
grant that as we rejoice in her commemoration,
so by her fervent intercession,
we may be delivered from present evils
and from everlasting death.
Through the same Christ our Lord.
Amensalve regina - hail holy queen 13 feb 2019.jpg

Jordan of Saxony met an untimely death at the age of 47, drowning in an accident which occurred on his return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1237.   In his vigorous life, Jordan extended what Father Dominic had begun so carefully and he opened avenues on which the Order would continue to struggle and to flourish.

The secret that makes his message so relevant today?   It is the secret of deep and personal friendship with Christ, a friendship which cannot be contained but sets the world on fire.

Blessed Jordan of Saxony, Pray for Us!bl jordan of saxony pray for us 13 feb 2019.jpg

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on CHARITY, QUOTES on SANCTITY, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

Quote/s of the Day – 13 February – Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)

Quote/s of the Day – 13 February – the Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)

“There are two ways of keeping God’s word,
namely, one, whereby we store in our memory
what we hear and the other,
whereby we put into practice, what we have heard
(and none will deny that the latter, is more commendable,
inasmuch, as it is better to sow grain,
than to store it in the barn).”there-are-two-ways-bl-jordan-of-saxony-13-feb-2018.jpg

Meeting a vagabond upon the road who feigned sickness and poverty, Blessed Jordan gave him one of his tunics, which the fellow at once carried straight to a tavern for drink. The brethren, seeing this done, taunted him with his simplicity:

‘There now, Master, see how wisely you have bestowed your tunic.’

‘I did so,’ said he,
‘because I believed him to be in want,
through sickness and poverty
and it seemed, at the moment,
to be a charity to help him. 
Still, I reckon it better, to have parted
with my tunic than with charity.’

Blessed Jordan of Saxony (1190-1237)

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, MORNING Prayers, Papa FRANCIS, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 13 February – “All these evil things come from within and they defile a man.”

One Minute Reflection – 13 February – Wednesday of the Fifth week in Ordinary Time, Year C. Gospel: Mark 7:14-23 and the Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony OP (1190-1237)

And he said, “What comes out of a man is what defiles a man.   For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, fornication, theft, murder, adultery, coveting, wickedness, deceit, licentiousness, envy, slander, pride, foolishness.   All these evil things come from within and they defile a man.” Mark 7:20-23

REFLECTION – “The boundary between good and evil does not pass outside of us but rather within us.   We could ask ourselves: where is my heart?   Jesus said:  “Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also”.   What is my treasure?   Is it Jesus, is it His teaching?   If so, then the heart is good.   Or is my treasure something else?   Thus it is a heart which needs purification and conversion.   Without a purified heart, one cannot have truly clean hands and lips which speak sincere words of love — it is all duplicitous, a double life — lips which speak words of mercy, of forgiveness but only a sincere and purified heart can do this.”…Pope Francis – Angelus, 30 August 2015mark 7 20 what comes out of a man - the boundary between good and evil - pope francis 13feb2019.jpg

PRAYER – God our Saviour, through the grace of Baptism, You made us children of light. Hear our prayer, that we may always walk in that light and work for truth, as Your witnesses before men.   May our hearts be purified by You grace and may our hands and lips speak with sincere words of love. Blessed Jordan, you worked and walked with zeal and passion in the light of the Lord, please pray for us.   We make our prayer, through Christ our Lord with the Holy Spirit, God forever, amen.bl-jordanofsaxony-prayforus-13-feb-2017-2.jpg

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237)

Thought for the Day – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237

“You have no doubt heard that our kind Father, Master Jordan, his two companions and ninety-nine other persons have been taken from this wicked world by shipwreck in a violent storm.   However, dear brothers, do not let your hearts be saddened by this awful calamity;  for God, in His mercy, has already greatly consoled us, who have become orphans through the untimely death of a good Father.   After the storm, the bodies of our three confrères were washed ashore and bright lights in the form of crosses shone over them every night until they were found and buried where they lay by those who escaped from the disaster.   These, together with many others, have borne testimony to the miracle.   Moreover, the inhabitants of the neighbourhood, drawn to the place of the catastrophe by reports of so marvellous an occurrence, testify that they experienced a sweet fragrance all round;   while those who touched the bodies declare that this fragrance did not leave their hands for more than ten days.   Indeed, this same sweet odour pervaded the locality until the fathers at Ptolomais came in a boat and took up the bodies for burial in the conventual church of that city.   There now repose the remains of our late beloved Master General;  and many wonders have in this short time been attributed to his intercession.   Blessed be God in all His works. Amen”

All through his religious life the second head of the Order had been regarded as a very saintly man.   A number of prodigies were said to have been wrought by him.   Others came after his death;  while several very holy persons declared that, in visions, they saw his soul ascend into heaven.   All this, together with the facts recorded in the letter just quoted, occasioned a devotion to the man of God which continued through the course of centuries and caused him to be given the title of Blessed Jordan of Saxony.   After a thorough study of this immemorial veneration by the Sacred Congregation of Rites, Leo XII, who reigned from 1823 to 1829, allowed the Friars Preacher the world over to say mass and recite the divine office in his honour.   Throughout his Order he is held in an esteem second only to that which is accorded to Saint Dominic.

It is not commonly known or understood the highly efficacious intercession available to us all and thus we pray, Blessed Jordan of Saxony, Pray for us!bl-jordanofsaxony-prayforus-- 13 feb 2017 . 2

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

Quote of the Day – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237)

Quote of the Day – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237)

“There are two ways of keeping God’s word, namely, one, whereby we store in our memory what we hear and the other, whereby we put into practice, what we have heard (and none will deny that the latter is more commendable, inasmuch, as it is better to sow grain, than to store it in the barn).”

Blessed Jordan of Saxony (1190-1237)there are two ways - bl jordan of saxony - 13 feb 2018

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, DOMINICAN OP, MORNING Prayers, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Our Morning Offering – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P.

Our Morning Offering – 13 February – The Memorial of Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P.

O Lord, King of all!
By St Albert the Great O.P. (1200-1280) Doctor of the Church

We pray to You, O Lord,
who are the supreme Truth,
and all truth is from You.
We beseech You, O Lord,
who are the highest Wisdom,
and all the wise depend on You for their wisdom.
You are the supreme Joy,
and all who are happy owe it to You.
You are the Light of minds,
and all receive their understanding from You.
We love, we love You above all.
We seek You, we follow You,
and we are ready to serve You.
We desire to dwell under Your power
for You are the King of all.
Amen.o lord,king of all by st albert the great - 13 feb 2018 - we pray to you o lord

Posted in DOMINICAN OP, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 13 February – Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237)

Saint of the Day – 13 February – Blessed Jordan of Saxony O.P. (1190-1237) Religious Priest, Preacher, the Second Master-General of the Domican Order, after St Dominic himself.   He was born in 1190 at Padberg Castle, diocese of Paderborn, Westphalia, old Saxony (in modern Germany), though it is rumoured to have been born in Palestine while his parents were on a pilgrimage, and named after the River Jordan but this is apparently aprochryphal.   He died by drowning in 1237 in a shipwreck off the coast of Syria while on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  He is buried in Acre.   Patronages – against drowning, of the Dominican Order, Vocations to the Dominicans.   Attributes – Dominican writing, a pen, a lily.

Header BLESSED-JORDAN

Mothers hid their sons when Master Jordan came to town…

These ten short words sum up in a humorous kind of way, the outstanding legacy of the successor of St Dominic.   It not only gives the impression that this new group of mendicant preachers had a clearly defined and essential role to play, challenging the infectious heresies so prevalent at the time (as was confirmed by Pope Honorius III in 1216 when he formally recognised the Order) but also that people were powerless to resist when confronted with it.   Of Blessed Jordan we are told that that during his tenure as Master General, between 1222 and 1237, over 1000 novices joined the Dominicans, new convents were established and new provinces formed.   Under his rule the Order continued to win many of the best men available, particularly in the Universities where many a Professor was seduced.   With such a charming figure sweeping through the neighbourhood is it any wonder that mothers tried to keep their sons out of reach?

A German of noble descent born in 1190, he had been in the Order a mere two years before his election as Master General in 1222.   By today’s standards, his rapid accession may appear hasty, a point he himself was quick to highlight when he became the first Provincial of Lombardy in 1221.   In the Libellus he writes:

‘In 1221, at the General Chapter in Bologna, they saw fit to make me the first Provincial of Lombardy, although I had only been in the Order one year and had not struck root as deeply as I ought to have done.   I was to be placed over others as their superior, before I had learned to govern my own imperfection.   I was not present at this Chapter myself.’bl jordan of saxony

Despite his anxiety, he must have made quite an impression on his brothers during his short tenure in the Order.   We are told about the type of person he was by those who knew.   It is obvious that he possessed all those qualities the ideal leader should have. Inspired by his brother and friend St Dominic, he was abounding in faith, kind and compassionate, humble, authoritative and yet at the same time understanding.   He had the ability to attract people by his sincerity.   His style of life complemented his style of words;  something that was evidently lacking at the time among the Clergy and Religious. This was vital at a time when ‘reform’ was the buzzword of the day.bl jordan - add

His great love for the poor was well known. There is a story said of him that:

‘Meeting a vagabond upon the road who feigned sickness and poverty, he gave him one of his tunics, which the fellow at once carried straight to a tavern for drink.   The brethren, seeing this done, taunted him with his simplicity:  ‘There now, Master, see how wisely you have bestowed your tunic.’  ‘I did so,’ said he, ‘because I believed him to be in want through sickness and poverty and it seemed at the moment to be a charity to help him;  still, I reckon it better to have parted with my tunic than with charity.’

Our Blessed Jordan may well be still speaking to us today!   Not all those people who present themselves as being needy these days may be genuine.   However, when we stop caring, we stop striving to be like Jesus.   Let us never restrain God’s work in our hearts but allow ourselves to be moved by compassion  . Perhaps it was this genuineness that caused Mothers in the district to be wary of his arrival.

 

Jordan died in a shipwreck on his return from Palestine, where he had visited the local convents of the Order;  the shipwreck occurred off the coast of Syria in 1237.   It is perhaps fitting that this great servant of the Order of Preachers, who was kept at arm’s length by the Mothers who feared his magnetic appeal on their sons, should nestle snuggly within the loving embrace of the Mother of God as famously depicted in that famous vision of St Dominic.death of blessed jordanmary and the dominican saints

Posted in CATHOLIC DEVOTIONS of the Month, MORNING Prayers, The HOLY NAME

The Wonders of the Holy Name – Fr Paul O’Sullivan, O.P. – “Revealing the Simplest Secret Ever of Holiness and Happiness.” Part Eight – 17 July

Previous – here: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/category/the-holy-name/

the wonders of the holy name-day eight-17 july

The Saints and the Holy Name

St Augustine:
This great Doctor of the Church,
found his delights in repeating the Holy Name.
He himself tells us that he found much pleasure
in books which made frequent mention of this all-consoling
Name.
St Bernard – felt a wonderful joy and consolation
in repeating the Name of Jesus.   He felt it, as he
says, like honey in his mouth and a delicious
peace in his heart.   We, too, shall feel immense
consolation and peace steal into our souls if we
imitate St. Bernard and repeat frequently this
Holy Name.
St Dominic – spent his days preaching
and discussing with the heretics.   He always went on
foot from place to place as well in the oppressive
heats of the summer as in the cold and rain of
winter.   The Albigensian heretics whom he tried to
convert were more like demons let loose from Hell
than mortal men.   Their doctrine was infamous
and their crimes enormous.   Yet, as another St.
Paul, he converted 100.000 of these wicked men so
that many of them became eminent for sanctity.
Wearied at night with his labours he asked only
for one reward which was to pass the night before
the Blessed Sacrament pouring out his soul in love
for Jesus.   When his poor body could resist no
longer he leaned his head against the Altar and
rested a little, after which he began once more his
intimate converse with Jesus.   In the morning he
celebrated Mass with the ardour of a seraph so that
at times his body was raised in the air in an
ecstasy of love.   The Name of Jesus filled his soul
with joy and delight.
Blessed Jordan of Saxony –  who succeeded St
Dominic as Master General of the Order, was a
preacher of great renown.   His words went straight
to the heart of his hearers above all when he spoke
to them of Jesus.   Learned professors of the University cities came
with delight to hear him and so many of them be~
came Dominican friars that others feared to come,
lest they, too, should be induced to join his Order.
So many were drawn by his irresistible eloquence
that when his visit to a city was announced the Prior
of the convent bought at once a great quantity of
white cloth to make habits for those who were
sure to seek entrance to the Order.   Blessed Jordan
himself received one thousand postulants to the
habit among whom were the most eminent professors
of the European Universities.

Posted in MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 13 February

Thought for the Day – 13 February

The Dominican preacher Jordan of Saxony was a man to contend with in the Europe of the thirteenth century.   We are told (with some exaggeration perhaps) that mothers would hide their sons when they heard he was coming to town;  and (probably with genuine accuracy) that universities feared losing their best professors to the pull of his eloquence.

Jordan had personal gifts and an energy that shook those whose lives he touched, leaving those with whom he came into contact somehow different.   His words were a force that prompted men to think about the deeper things of their existence—and to desire what St. Paul called “the greater gifts” (cf. 1 Corinthians 12:31).

What could a man of the thirteenth century, even a very good man, have to offer us today? Ours is a fast-moving world, a far-advanced one in many ways.   Would this European whose worldview was so far removed from our questioning and our efforts, discern what God is saying in our day?

Jordan of Saxony met an untimely death at the age of 47, drowning in an accident which occurred on his return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1237.   In his vigorous life, Jordan extended what Father Dominic had begun so carefully and he opened avenues on which the Order would continue to struggle and to flourish.   The secret that makes his message so relevant today?   It is the secret of deep and personal friendship with Christ, a friendship which cannot be contained, but sets the world on fire!   (Nashville Domicans)

And THIS is as relevant today as it was in the thirteenth century – even more so perhaps!

bl-jordanofsaxony-prayforus-2

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Quote of the Day – 13 February

Quote of the Day – 13 February

“There are two ways of keeping God’s word, namely, one whereby we store in our memory what we hear and the other whereby we put into practice what we have heard (and none will deny that the latter is more commendable, inasmuch as it is better to sow grain than to store it in the barn).”

~~~Blessed Jordan of Saxony

quote-bl-jordan-of-saxony

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 13 February – Blessed Jordan of Saxony

Saint of the Day – 13 February – Blessed Jordan of Saxony/referred to in Latin as Jordanis, also known as de Alamania – (1190-1237) Second Master General of the Order of Preachers Patron of Vocations to the Dominican Order, against drowning, of University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines

Jordan belonged to the noble German family of the Counts of Eberstein.  He was born in the Castle of Borrenstrick, in the diocese of Paderborn.   He began his studies in his native land and was sent to complete them at the University of Paris.  While a student he met Dominic de Guzman, the founder of the Order of Preachers and was inspired by the preaching of Reginald of Orleans O.P. (also known as Reginald of Saint-Gilles) to join the Dominican Order.   He received the habit on Ash Wednesday, 1220. Jordan was a Master of Arts and a grammarian, and taught in the schools of Paris.

In 1221, a General Chapter of the Order held in Bologna appointed Jordan Prior Provincial of Lombardy in Italy.   On 6 August 1221, Dominic died and in 1222 Jordan was elected as his successor as Master General of the Order of Preachers.   Like Saint Dominic, Jordan was famed as a strict disciplinarian whose commitment to the Rule was tempered with kindness.

During Jordan’s administration, the young Order increased to over 300 priories.   Jordan is particularly remembered for his eloquence in attracting candidates to join the Order. Through his lectures in university towns, he won many—allegedly well over 1,000—professors and students for the Order from the universities of Europe, among whom was Albertus Magnus who is thought to have been recruited in Padua.   He added four new provinces to the eight already existing.  Twice he obtained for the Order a chair at the University of Paris and helped to found the University of Toulouse. He established the first general house of studies of the Order.

 

Additionally, Jordan was a spiritual guide to many, including one of the first Dominican nuns, the Blessed Diana degli Andalò, O.P.   He also found time to write a number of books: a life of St. Dominic and several other works.   Among them was the Libellus de principiis Ordinis Praedicatorum (“Booklet on the beginnings of the Order of Preachers”), a Latin text which is both the earliest biography of Saint Dominic and the first narrative history of the foundation of the Order.

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A section of a work by Friar Gerald de Frachet describing the lives of the first Dominicans, the Lives of the Brothers (Vitae fratrum), is dedicated to describing his character, virtue and miracles. All of the first chroniclers of the Order describe Jordan’s kindness and personal charm.   He had the ability to console the troubled and to inspire the despondent with new hope.

Jordan died, at the age of forty-seven, in a shipwreck on his return from Palestine, where he was visiting the local monasteries of the Order.   The shipwreck occurred off the coast of Syria on 13 February 1237.   Jordan was buried in the Dominican Church of St. John in Akko, in present-day Israel.   He was beatified by Pope Leo XII in 1825.

Bl Jordan of Saxony is credited with introducing the practice of singing the Salve Regina in procession at the end of Compline, done, it is recorded, to calm the spirits of the Brothers, who were being tried by the Devil.

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