Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Feast of Our Lady of Hope of Pontmain and Memorials of the Saints – 17 January

Our Lady of Hope, Our Lady of Pontmain – 17 January: During the Franco-Prussian War, German troops approached the town of Pontmain, France and the villagers there prayed for protection. On the evening of 17 January 1871, Mary appeared in the sky for several minutes over the town. She wore a dark blue dress covered in stars, carried a crucifix and below her were the words – “Pray, my children, God will answer your prayers very soon. He will not allow you to be touched.” That night the German army was ordered to withdraw and an armistice ending the war was signed eleven days later on 28 January.
In May 1872, Bishop Wicart authorized the construction of a Sanctuary, which was consecrated in October 1900. In 1905 Pope Pius X elevated the Sanctuary to the status of a Basilica – The Basilica of Our Lady of Hope of Pontmain.
Pope Pius XI gave a final decision regarding the mass and office in honour of Our Lady of Hope of Pontmain. A final papal honour was given to Our Lady of Hope on 16 July 1932 by Cardinal Pacelli, who later became Pope Pius XII, by passing a decree from the Chapter of St Peter’s Basilica, that the Statue of the Blessed Lady, Mother of Hope, be solemnly honoured with the crown of gold. The Lady then was crowned in the presence of Archbishop, Bishops, Priests and the laity by Cardinal Verdier, Archbishop of Paris. The coronation took place on 24 July 1934.
At Pontmain, it was a matter of a message of prayer, very simple in the dramatic circumstances of war and invasion. At Pontmain, Mary is a sign of hope in the midst of war. A place of pilgrimage, it attracts annually around 200,000 drawn from among the people of the region, with some international pilgrimages, especially from Germany.

It was in the winter of 1871 in the village of Pontmain, France, Eugene Barbedette was busy in his father’s barn helping prepare the animal feed. He stood briefly in the open doorway, admiring the beautiful evening. Suddenly the gaze of the 12 year old was held there, for opposite the barn and in a framework of stars, stood a beautiful lady – motionless – smiling at him.
“Do you see anything?” he shouted to the others, “Look, over there!”
“Yes,” cried his brother Joseph, “a beautiful lady dressed in a blue robe with golden stars, yes and blue shoes with golden buckles…and, she has a golden crown which is getting bigger and a black veil.”
Since the father did not see her, he told the boys to get on with their work; then curiously, he asked, “Eugene, do you still see anything?”
“Yes, she’s still there,” the boy answered and ran to fetch his mother; she saw nothing but with a woman’s intuition, she thought it might be the Blessed Virgin and assembling the family gently, all prayed five Paters and Aves in honour of the Mother of God. She called for a nun at the convent next door, who brought her two little charges with her, the latter, Francoise and Jean Marie, reaching the door of the barn, called out, “Oh, look at that lovely lady with the golden stars!” and clapped their hands with delight.
The news spread quickly, people gathered, with them the Cure, M Guerin. The Magnificat was intoned and Eugene shouted, “Look what she is doing!”
Slowly a great white streamer unfolded and in large letters they read: “Pray, my children, God will answer your prayers very soon. He will not allow you to be touched.”

The Cure then intoned the hymn: “My Sweet Jesus…” At that a red cross with the wounded body of Christ appeared before the Virgin, who held it. At the top in large red letters was written, “Jesus Christ.”
The crowd burst into tears, while the Cure ordered night prayers to be said; a white veil hid the vision, while our Lady smiled at the children, a smile which haunted them all through life with its beauty. Something of the sorrow of farewell was depicted on the faces of Eugene and Joseph, for the cure said quickly, “Can you still see anything?”
“No, it is quite finished,” they answered.

At the moment the message was being written in the sky, a messenger passing in front of the crowd had shouted, “You may well pray, the Russians are at Laval.” But they never entered it.
On the 17th of January, at six o’clock at night, the very hour the Virgin appeared to the children of Pontmain, the division of soldiers, without apparent reason, received the order to retire.
On the 28th of January, the armistice was signed at Versailles. After long and searching inquiry, Mgr. Wicart, the Bishop of Laval, proclaimed the authenticity of the vision and at the very spot where Our Lady had appeared, a cHURCH was erected in honour of Our Lady of Hope of Pontmain. There the Queen of Heaven receives her countless children and gives them fresh hope in their trials, as she gave France peace in her hour of need.
The Basilica is a magnificent structure in the 13th century style and one may still see the barn where Eugene and Joseph worked when Mary appeared.

This window is in the Basilica

St Anthony Abbot (251-356) (Memorial)
St Anthony’s Life:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-st-anthony-abbot-c-251-356/
AND:
https://anastpaul.com/2017/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-st-anthony-abbot/

St Achillas of Sketis
St Amoes of Sketis
St Antony of Rome
Bl Euphemia Domitilla
Bl Gamelbert of Michaelsbuch
St Genitus
St Genulfus
St Jenaro Sánchez Delgadillo
St John of Rome
Bl Joseph of Freising
St Julian Sabas the Elder
St Marcellus of Die
St Merulus of Rome
St Mildgytha
St Nennius
St Neosnadia
St Pior
St Richimir

Blessed Rosalina of Villeneuve O.Cart. (1263–1329)
Biography:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-blessed-rosalina-of-villeneuve-o-cart-1263-1329/

St Sabinus of Piacenza
St Sulpicius of Bourges (Died c 647) Bishop
Blessed Teresio Olivelli (1916–1945) Martyr
His Life and Death:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-blessed-teresio-olivelli-1916-1945-martyr-rebel-for-love/
Martyrs of Langres: Eleusippus, Leonilla, Meleusippus, Speusippus

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Our Lady of Pontmain – 17 January and Memorials of the Saints

St Anthony Abbot (251-356) (Memorial)
St Anthony’s Life:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-st-anthony-abbot-c-251-356/
AND:
https://anastpaul.com/2017/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-st-anthony-abbot/

Our Lady of Pontmain – 17 January:  During the Franco-Prussian War, German troops approached the town of Pontmain, France and the villagers there prayed for protection. On the evening of 17 January 1871, Mary appeared in the sky for several minutes over the town. She wore a dark blue dress covered in stars, carried a crucifix and below her were the words – Pray please. God will hear you soon. My son lets Himself be touched. That night the German army was ordered to withdraw and an armistice ending the war was signed eleven days later on 28 January. Approval of diocesan bishop.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

St Achillas of Sketis
St Amoes of Sketis
St Antony of Rome
Bl Euphemia Domitilla
Bl Gamelbert of Michaelsbuch
St Genitus
St Genulfus
St Jenaro Sánchez Delgadillo
St John of Rome
Bl Joseph of Freising
St Julian Sabas the Elder
St Marcellus of Die
St Merulus of Rome
St Mildgytha
St Nennius
St Neosnadia
St Pior
St Richimir

Blessed Rosalina of Villeneuve O.Cart. (1263–1329)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/01/17/saint-of-the-day-17-january-blessed-rosalina-of-villeneuve-o-cart-1263-1329/

St Sabinus of Piacenza
St Sulpicius of Bourges
Blessed Teresio Olivelli (1916–1945) Martyr

Martyrs of Langres: Eleusippus, Leonilla, Meleusippus, Speusippus

Posted in QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 17 January – The Memorial of St Anthony Abbot (251-356)

Thought for the Day – 17 January – Thursday of the First week in Ordinary Time and The Memorial of St Anthony Abbot (251-356)

The life of Anthony will remind many people of Saint Francis of Assisi.   At 20, Anthony was so moved by the Gospel message, “Go, sell what you have, and give to [the] poor” (Mark 10:21b), that he actually did just that with his large inheritance.   He is different from Francis in that most of Anthony’s life was spent in solitude.   He saw the world completely covered with snares and gave the Church and the world the witness of solitary asceticism, great personal mortification and prayer.   But no saint is antisocial, and Anthony drew many people to himself for spiritual healing and guidance.

At 54, he responded to many requests and founded a sort of monastery of scattered cells. Again, like Francis, he had great fear of “stately buildings and well-laden tables.”

At 60, he hoped to be a martyr in the renewed Roman persecution of 311, fearlessly exposing himself to danger while giving moral and material support to those in prison. At 88, he was fighting the Arian heresy, that massive trauma from which it took the Church centuries to recover.   “The mule kicking over the altar” denied the divinity of Christ.

Anthony is associated in art with a T-shaped cross, a pig and a book.   The pig and the cross are symbols of his valiant warfare with the devil—the cross his constant means of power over evil spirits, the pig a symbol of the devil himself.   The book recalls his preference for “the book of nature” over the printed word.   Anthony died in solitude at age 105.

In an age that smiles at the notion of devils and angels, a person known for having power over evil spirits must at least make us pause.   And in a day when people speak of life as a “rat race,” one who devotes a whole life to solitude and prayer points to an essential of the Christian life in all ages.   Anthony’s hermit life reminds us of the absoluteness of our break with sin and the totality of our commitment to Christ.   Even in God’s good world, there is another world whose false values constantly tempt us.

St Anthony told his monks:

For the presence, either of the good or evil,
by the help of God, can easily be distinguished.
The vision of the holy ones, is not fraught with distraction:
‘For they will not strive, nor cry,
nor shall anyone hear their voice’ (Matthew 12:19; Isaiah 42:2).
But it comes quietly and gently.
that an immediate joy, gladness and courage, arise in the soul.
For the Lord, who is our joy, is with them
and the power of God the Father.

St Ambrose: (340-397) Life of Saint Anthonyfor-the-presence-either-of-the-good-or-evil-st-anthony-17-jan-2018.jpg

St Anthony, Abbot, Pray for us!st anthony abbot pray for us 17 jan 2019.jpg

Posted in CATECHESIS, CATHOLIC Quotes, DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, Papa FRANCIS, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, SPEAKING of ....., The SIGN of the CROSS

Quote/s of the Day – 17 January – The Sign of the Cross

Quote/s of the Day – 17 January – Thursday of the First week in Ordinary Time and The Memorial of St Anthony Abbot (251-356)

Speaking of:  The Sign of the Cross

“The illusions of this world soon vanish,
especially if a man arms himself with
the Sign of the Cross.
The devils tremble
at the Sign of the Cross of our Lord,
by which He triumphed over
and disarmed them.”

St Anthony Abbot (251-356)the-illusions-of-this-world-st-anthony-abbot-17-jan-2018.jpg

“Let us not then be ashamed to confess the Crucified.
Be the Cross our seal made with boldness by our fingers
on our brow and in everything;
over the bread we eat and the cups we drink;
in our comings in and goings out;
before our sleep, when we lie down and when we awake;
when we are in the way and when we are still.
Great is that preservative;
it is without price, for the poor’s sake;
without toil, for the sick, since also its grace is from God.
It is the Sign of the faithful and the dread of evils;
for He has triumphed over them in it,
having made a shew of them openly;
for when they see the Cross, they are reminded of the Crucified;
they are afraid of Him, Who hath bruised the heads of the dragon.
Despise not the Seal, because of the freeness of the Gift
but for this rather honour thy Benefactor.”

St Cyril of Jerusalem (315-387) Father and Doctorbe the cross our seal - st cyril of jerusalem - 17 jan 2019.jpglet-us-not-then-be-ashamed-st-cyril-of-jerusalem-17-jan-2018.jpg

“The sign of the cross
is the most terrible weapon
against the devil.
Thus the Church wishes not only,
that we have it continually
in front of our minds,
to recall to us
just what our souls are worth
and what they cost Jesus Christ
but also that we should make it
at every juncture ourselves:
when we go to bed,
when we awaken during the night,
when we get up,
when we begin any action,
and, above all,
when we are tempted.”

St John Vianney (1786-1859)the sign of the cross - st john vianney.- new version - 17 jan 2018 jpg

“The cross is the badge that shows who we are –
our speaking, thinking, looking, working,
we are under the sign of the cross,
that is, the love of Jesus, to the end.”the cross is the badge - pope francis 17 jan 2019.jpg

“Making the sign of the cross when we wake up,
before meals, before a danger, to defend against evil,
at night before sleep means to tell ourselves
and others who we belong to, who we want to be.”

Pope Francismaking the sign of the cross - pope francis 17 jan 2019.jpg

3 Things to Know about the Cross – Fr Mike Schmitz

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES on the DEVIL/EVIL, SAINT of the DAY, The HOLY CROSS

Thought for the Day – 17 January – The Memorial of St Anthony Abbot (251-356) 

Thought for the Day – 17 January – The Memorial of St Anthony Abbot (251-356)

In an age that smiles and jeers at the notion of devils and angels, a person known for having power over evil spirits must at least make us pause.   And in a day when people speak of life as a “rat race,” one who devotes a whole life to solitude and prayer points to an essential of the Christian life in all ages.   Anthony’s hermit life reminds us of the absoluteness of our break with sin and the totality of our commitment to Christ.   Even in God’s good world, there is another world whose false values constantly tempt us.

Our most powerful protection IS the Sign of the Cross.

“Let us not then be ashamed
to confess the Crucified.
BE THE CROSS OUR SEAL,
made with boldness by our fingers,
on our brow and in everything,
over the bread we eat and the cups we drink,
in our comings in and goings out,
before our sleep,
when we lie down
and when we awake,
when we are in the way
and when we are still.
Great is that preservative,
it is without price,
for the poor’s sake,
without toil,
for the sick,
since also its’ grace is from God.
It is the Sign of the faithful
and the dread of evils –
for He has triumphed over them in it,
having made a shew of them openly –
for when they see the Cross,
they are reminded of the Crucified;
they are afraid of Him,
Who hath bruised the heads of the dragon.
Despise not the Seal
because of the freeness of the Gift,
but for this,
rather honour thy Benefactor!”

St Cyril of Jerusalem (315-387) Father & Doctor of the Churchlet us not then be ashamed - st cyril of jerusalem - 17 jan 2018

“The sign of the cross
is the most terrible weapon
against the devil. 
Thus the Church wishes not only,
that we have it continually
in front of our minds,
to recall to us 
just what our souls are worth 
and what they cost Jesus Christ 
but also that we should make it
at every juncture ourselves: 
when we go to bed, 
when we awaken during the night, 
when we get up, 
when we begin any action, 
and, above all, 
when we are tempted.”

St John Vianney (1786-1859)the sign of the cross - st john vianney.- new version - 17 jan 2018 jpg

St Anthony Abbot Pray for us!st anthony abbot - pray for us

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 17 January

Thought for the Day – 17 January

In an age that smiles and jeers at the notion of devils and angels, a person known for having power over evil spirits must at least make us pause.   And in a day when people speak of life as a “rat race,” one who devotes a whole life to solitude and prayer points to an essential of the Christian life in all ages.   Anthony’s hermit life reminds us of the absoluteness of our break with sin and the totality of our commitment to Christ.   Even in God’s good world, there is another world whose false values constantly tempt us.

Our most powerful protection IS the Sign of the Cross.

“Let us not then be ashamed to confess the Crucified.   Be the Cross our seal made with boldness by our fingers on our brow and in everything; over the bread we eat and the cups we drink; in our comings in and goings out; before our sleep, when we lie down and when we awake; when we are in the way and when we are still.   Great is that preservative; it is without price, for the poor’s sake; without toil, for the sick, since also its grace is from God.   It is the Sign of the faithful and the dread of evils; for He has triumphed over them in it, having made a shew of them openly; for when they see the Cross, they are reminded of the Crucified; they are afraid of Him, Who hath bruised the heads of the dragon. Despise not the Seal, because of the freeness of the Gift; but for this rather honour thy Benefactor.”……….. St. Cyril of Jerusalem

St Anthony Abbot Pray for us!

st-anthony-abbot-jan-17

 

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 17 January – St Anthony Abbot

Saint of the Day – 17 January – St Anthony Abbot (c 251-358) Also known as: • Abba Antonius • Anthony of Egypt• Anthony of the Desert• Anthony the Anchorite• Anthony the Great• Anthony the Hermit• Antonio Abate• Father of Cenobites• Father of All Monks• Father of Western Monasticism PATRON against eczema, epileptics; against epilepsy, against ergotism, against pestilence, against skin diseases, against skin rashes, of amputees, anchorites, animals, basket makers and weavers, brushmakers, butchers, cemetery workers, domestic animals, farmers, gravediggers, graveyards, hermits, hogs, pigs, swine, monks, relief from pestilence, swineherds, Hospitallers, Tempio-Ampurias, Italy, diocese of 9 cities.

The life of Anthony will remind many people of St. Francis of Assisi. At 20, Anthony was so moved by the Gospel message, “Go, sell what you have, and give to [the] poor” (Mark 10:21b), that he actually did just that with his large inheritance.   He is different from Francis in that most of Anthony’s life was spent in solitude. He saw the world completely covered with snares and gave the Church and the world the witness of solitary asceticism, great personal mortification and prayer.   But no saint is antisocial and Anthony drew many people to himself for spiritual healing and guidance.

At 54, he responded to many requests and founded a sort of monastery of scattered cells. Again like Francis, he had great fear of “stately buildings and well-laden tables.”

At 60, he hoped to be a martyr in the renewed Roman persecution of 311, fearlessly exposing himself to danger while giving moral and material support to those in prison.   At 88, he was fighting the Arian heresy, that massive trauma from which it took the Church centuries to recover. “The mule kicking over the altar” denied the divinity of Christ.

Anthony is associated in art with a T-shaped cross, a pig and a book.   The pig and the cross are symbols of his valiant warfare with the devil—the cross his constant means of power over evil spirits, the pig a symbol of the devil himself.   The book recalls his preference for “the book of nature” over the printed word.   Anthony died in solitude at age 105.