Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 11 May

St Anastasius of Lérida
St Anthimus of Rome
St Bassus of Sabina
St Bertilla
St Criotan of MacReddin
Bl Diego of Saldaña
St Evellius of Pisa
St Fabius of Sabina
St Fremund of Dunstable
St Gengulphus of Burgundy
Blessed Gregory Celli of Verucchio OSA (1225-1343)
St Gualberto
St Ignatius of Laconi OFM Cap. (1701-1781)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/saint-of-the-day-11-may-st-ignatius-of-laconi-o-f-m-cap-1701-1781/

Bl Illuminatus
St Illuminatus of San Severino
Bl James Walworth
Bl John Rochester
St Maiulo of Hadrumetum
St Majolus of Cluny
St Mamertus (Died c 475)
His Life:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/05/11/saint-of-the-day-11-may-st-mamertus-died-c-475/
St Maximus of Sabina
St Mayeul
St Mozio of Constantinople
St Possessor of Verdun
St Principia of Rome
St Tudy
St Vincent L’Hénoret
Bl Vivaldus
St Walbert of Hainault

Martyrs of Camerino: An imperial Roman official, his wife, their children and servants, all of whom were converts and martyrs: Anastasius, Aradius, Callisto, Eufemia, Evodius, Felice, Primitiva, Theopista.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 11 May

St Anastasius of Lérida
St Anthimus of Rome
St Bassus of Sabina
St Bertilla
St Criotan of MacReddin
Bl Diego of Saldaña
St Evellius of Pisa
St Fabius of Sabina
St Fremund of Dunstable
St Gengulphus of Burgundy
St Gualberto
St Ignatius of Laconi OFM Cap. (1701-1781)
Biography:   https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/saint-of-the-day-11-may-st-ignatius-of-laconi-o-f-m-cap-1701-1781/

Bl Illuminatus
St Illuminatus of San Severino
Bl James Walworth
Bl John Rochester
St Maiulo of Hadrumetum
St Majolus of Cluny
St Mamertus (Died c 475)
St Maximus of Sabina
St Mayeul
St Mozio of Constantinople
St Possessor of Verdun
St Principia of Rome
St Tudy
St Vincent L’Hénoret
Bl Vivaldus
St Walbert of Hainault

Martyrs of Camerino: An imperial Roman official, his wife, their children and servants, all of whom were converts and martyrs: Anastasius, Aradius, Callisto, Eufemia, Evodius, Felice, Primitiva, Theopista.

Posted in FRANCISCAN OFM, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 11 May – St Ignatius of Laconi O.F.M. Cap. (1701-1781)

Saint of the Day – 11 May – St Ignatius of Laconi O.F.M. Cap. (1701-1781) Franciscan of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin born as Vincenzo Peis on 17 December 1701 at Laconi, Nuoro, Italy and died on 11 May 1781 in Cagliari, Italy of natural causes.  Known as  “the Holy Friar,” “the Apostle of the Streets, “ “the Wonder-worker”,  “the Miracle-Worker” and “Padre Santo.”   His conquering a serious illness prompted him to consecrate his life to God and therefore entered the religious life though not as an ordained priest.   Peis was better known in Sardinia for his humble demeanour coupled with his concern for those who were poor.   He mingled with all people he met and was generous towards those who were ill.   But he became known as something of a wonder worker during his life and he had performed 121 miracles during his life. Patronages-Oristano, Students, Beggars.St Ignatius of Laconi

Vincenzo Peis was born on 10 December 1701 in Sardinia as one of seven children to the poor peasants Mattia Peis Cadello and Anna Maria Sanna Casu.   He was baptised as “Francesco Ignazio Vincenzo” since he was born out of a difficult pregnancy in which her mother invoked the intercession of Saint Francis of Assisi.

Ignatius worked on the fields to support his parents.   He suffered a serious illness circa 1719 (aged seventeen) that made him vow that he would consecrate himself to God and join the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin if he managed to recover from it.   He did so recover but put off the fulfilment of his vow after his father convinced him to wait;  his father was anxious about it because he depended on Ignatius for support in the fields. But there seems to be some indication that his parents objected to his entering the order. In 1721 he was in danger once more when the horse he was riding panicked.   He could have been thrown off but he called upon the assistance of Saint Francis of Assisi and renewed the vow he had made during his illness.   This time his parents did not raise objections to his becoming a friar and granted him their blessing.   In his childhood he often called the local church his “home” and took St Lawrence of Brindisi (1559-1619) as his personal role model.

He asked for admission at the convent in Cagliari but the superiors there hesitated because of his delicate health.   He then called upon an influential friend who interceded for him and he was allowed to be received into the novitiate on 10 November 1721. Ignatius made his profession on 10 November 1722.    Despite his infirmities his ardour allowed him to attend the spiritual exercises of the order and to excel in perfection of his observance of the order’s Rule.   From 1722 until 1737 he worked at the house’s weaving shed and from 1737 onwards was an alms beggar.

Ignatius spent his time in a number of different occupations and was later appointed as the quester of alms due to his humble and modest conduct.   He had good relations with the people in Cagliari who realised that although he was begging alms, he was also giving back to them in a spiritual manner.   His modest demeanour was seen as a quiet sermon for all who saw him going about which made him a noted figure.,, He seldom spoke; when required he spoke with exceptional kindness and great affection.   He would also instruct the children and the uneducated that he came across as well as going out to comfort the sick and urging sinners to be converted and to do penance.

There is a legend that he was known for his strict and total obedience to his superiors even when it required the denial of his own will.   He was accustomed to go to the house of an usurer because he feared that in accepting an alms from him he would share the guilt of this man’s injustices.   But when the man complained and the superior commanded him he accepted alms from the man.   It was when he returned that he opened the sack that the usurer offered and blood started to flow out.   To those around him the saint said:  “This is the blood of the poor squeezed from them by usury”.

His sister had often written to him asking him to visit her so that she could get his advice in certain matters.   Brother Ignatius had no mind to heed her request but when his superior ordered him to do so he at once undertook the visit.   But he left again as soon as he had given the required advice.   His brother was sent to prison and it was hoped that – in view of reputation of Brother Ignatius – the latter could obtain his brother’s release.   His superior sent him to speak to the governor but he asked that his brother be dealt with according to justice.

Despite his poor health and other infirmities he continued on in his work no matter how arduous it seemed.   Even after he became blind in 1779, he continued to work on for the benefit of those around him. Ignatius died on 11 May 1781 at 3:00pm in Cagliari where his remains were interred.

St Ignatius’ grave soon became a place in which miracles flourished and this was one dimension towards the opening of his cause for canonisation.   He was beatified on 16 June 1940 and was Canonised on 21 October 1951 by Pope Pius XII.   St Ignatius of Laconi WITH MARY

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 11 May

Thought for the Day – 11 May

The life of Saint Ignatius reminds us that even the most menial of tasks, if offered to the Lord, are pleasing to Him.
During his daily rounds, Saint Ignatius of Laconi did more than beg, of course.    He served as a model of perfect Christian humility and self-denial.    He instructed the community children in the tenets of the Christian faith—most of whom were too poor to attend school and instead worked as he had done.   He comforted the ill and provided encouragement to those who constantly struggled.    Numerous miracles were reported at his pious intercession.   Never having been educated himself, Saint Ignatius was illiterate and his words far from polished or eloquent.    He recognised his limitations and constantly directed any praise or recognition from himself to the Lord, where all good things originate.   The lessons from this Saint are countless, they are difficult for us to attain, most especially in the fast-paced, money-driven society in which we live.   Let us always keep in mind and before our eyes God’s love and mercy, that high-paying jobs are not what He requires of us!   To those who came to St Ignatius for comfort, he would advise, “Trust God.”

Lord God, You led Saint Ignatius along the way of humility, innocence, and fraternal charity to the heights of sanctity.    Help us to imitate his virtues and to practice charity, trust in You and obedience, on earth in word and deed. Amen.

St Ignatius of Laconi, Pray for us!

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Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 11 May – St Ignatius of Laconi

Saint of the Day – 11 May  – St. Ignatius of Laconi, O.F.M. Cap. (1701-1781) Religious Friar (born Vincenzo Peis) Known as  “the holy friar,” “the apostle of the streets, “ and “Padre Santo.”

 

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St Ignatius was a Sardinian Capuchin monk.     Born into a peasant family, during a serious illness as a young man he vowed that if he recovered his health he would consecrate his life to God in the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin.    He did regain his health but put off fulfilling his vow.    There is some indication that his parents raised objections to his entering the Franciscans.    In 1721 his life was again threatened when a horse which he was riding panicked.    Ignatius called upon the assistance of Saint Francis of Assisi and renewed the vow he had previously made.    This time his parents did not raise objections to his becoming a Franciscan.

He asked for admission at the Capuchin friary at Cagliari but the superiors there hesitated because of his delicate health.    Ignatius then called upon an influential friend who interceded for him and he was finally received into the novitiate.    Despite his physical infirmities, his ardour allowed him to attend the spiritual exercises of the community and excel in perfection of his observance of the Rule of Saint Francis.

After being employed in the community for several years at various occupations, he was appointed quester of alms because of his edifying conduct.    He had good relations with the citizens of Cagliari, who realized that although Brother Ignatius was begging alms, he was also giving back to them in a spiritual manner.    His modest demeanour was seen as a quiet sermon for all who saw him going about.    He seldom spoke; but when charity required it, he spoke with exceptional kindness.    He would also instruct the children and the uneducated, comfort the sick and urge sinners to be converted and to do penance.

Ignatius was known for punctually obeying his superiors, even when it required the denial of his own will.    He was accustomed to pass by the house of an usurer, because he feared that in accepting an alms from him he would share the guilt of this man’s injustices.    But when the man complained and the superior commanded, Ignatius accepted alms from the man.    On returning to the friary, St. Ignatius opened the sack offered by the usurer and blood flowed out.    To those around him the saint said, “This is the blood of the poor squeezed from them by usury.”

Ignatius’ sister had often written to him asking him to pay her a visit, so she could get his advice in certain matters.    Ignatius had no mind to heed her request but when his superior ordered him to do so, he at once undertook the journey.    But he left again as soon as he had given the required advice.

When his brother was sent to prison, it was hoped that, in view of the reputation of Brother Ignatius, the latter could obtain his brother’s release.    His superior sent him to speak to the governor but he asked merely that his brother be dealt with according to justice.    Not for anything in the world would Brother Ignatius have kept anyone from doing his duty.

Despite his infirmity, Ignatius persevered in his work until he was 80 years old.    Even after he became blind, he continued to make his daily rounds for two years.    The veneration of the people increased and many sick persons attributed miraculous healings to him.

He died on May 11, 1781 and many miracles were said to have occurred at his grave. Brother Ignatius was beatified in 1940 and canonized in 1951 by Pope Pius XII.