Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Our Morning Offering – 30 September – Memorial of St Jerome (347-419) Father and Doctor

Our Morning Offering – 30 September – Memorial of St Jerome (347-419) Father and Doctor

O Lord, show Your mercy to me
By St Jerome 

O Lord, show Your mercy to me
and gladden my heart.
I am like the man on the way to Jericho
who was overtaken by robbers,
wounded and left for dead.
O Good Samaritan,
come to my aid.
I am like the sheep that went astray.
O Good Shepherd,
seek me out and bring me home
in accord with Your will.
Let me dwell in Your house
all the days of my life
and praise You for ever and ever
with those who are there. Ameno lord, show your mercy to me - st jerome - 30 sept 2017

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 30 September – St Jerome (347-419) Father and Doctor of the Church

Saint of the Day – 30 September – St Jerome (347-419) Father and Doctor of the Church – Priest, Confessor, Theologian, Historian, Hermit, Mystic – born Eusebius Hieronymus Sophronius also known as Girolamo, Hieronymus, Jerom and the Man of the Bible – (347 at Strido, Dalmatia – 419 of natural causes).  His body was interred in Bethlehem and his relics are now enshrined at the Basilica of Saint Mary Major in Rome, Italy.   Patronages – • archeologists• archivists• Bible scholars• librarians; libraries• schoolchildren; students • translators• Saint-Jérôme, Québec, city of• Saint-Jérôme, Québec, diocese of• Taos Indian Pueblo.   Attributes – • cardinal’s hat, often on the ground or behind him, indicating that he turned his back on the pomp of ecclesiastical life• lion, referring to thelion who befriended him after he pulled a thorn from the creature’s paw• man beating himself in the chest with a stone• aged monk in desert• aged monk with Bible• aged monk writing • old man with a lion• skull• hourglass.

CRASH-COURSE-JEROME

St Jerome was a man of extremes.   He lived to age 91 even though he undertook extreme penances.   Jerome had a fierce temper but an equally intense love of Christ.   This brilliant saint was born in Eastern Europe around 345. His Christian family sent him to Rome at age 12 for a good education.   He studied there until he was 20.   Then he and his friends lived in a small monastery for three years, until the group dissolved.   Jerome set out for Palestine but when he reached Antioch, he fell seriously ill. He dreamed one night that he was taken before the judgment seat of God and condemned for being a heretic.   This dream made a deep impression on him.

He is best known for his translation of the Bible into Latin mainly from the Hebrew (the translation that became known as the Vulgate) and his commentaries on the Gospels.  His list of writings is extensive.   Jerome was strong willed.   His writings, especially those opposing what he considered heresy, were sometimes explosive.   His temperament helped him do difficult tasks but it also made him enemies.   Jerome was named a Doctor of the Church for the Vulgate, his commentaries on Scripture, his writings on monastic life and his belief that during a controversy on theological opinions, the See of Rome was where the matter should be settled.

In order to be able to do such work, Jerome prepared himself well.   He was a master of Latin, Greek, Hebrew and Chaldaic.   He began his studies at his birthplace, Stridon in Dalmatia.   After his preliminary education, he went to Rome, the center of learning at that time and thence to Trier, Germany, where the scholar was very much in evidence. He spent several years in each place, always trying to find the very best teachers. He once served as private secretary to Pope Damasus.

Skilled in the study of languages and exegesis, he laboured for more than 20 years to translate most of the Bible into the Latin language.   Jerome’s edition, the Vulgate, is arguably the most influential translation of the Bible.   During the Council of Trent (1545–1563), the Vulgate was affirmed as the official text of the Church.  He is still considered the Church’s greatest Doctor of Scriptures.

He conferred this praise upon St. Augustine:  “As I have done, you applied all your energy to make the enemies of the Church your personal enemies.”   This eulogy is consistent with the counsel of St. Augustine:  “You must hate the evil, but love the one who errs.”

Regarding St. Jerome the Roman Breviary says:  “He pummeled the heretics with his most harsh writings.” 

St Jerome was orthodox in his theology and was a defender of historic Christianity. However, his greatest contributions to the faith came in terms of biblical studies and translation.

  1. Jerome insisted that Bible translations should come from the languages Scripture was originally written in.   For example, instead of relying on the popular Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures of the time (the Septuagint), Jerome utilized ancient Hebrew copies that he considered more reliable.
  2. Jerome believed that Christians should be well grounded in and possess a good knowledge of Scripture.   In his commentary on Isaiah, Jerome stated: “Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.”
  3. Jerome modeled and advocated the Christian ascetic and scholarly life.   The life of a monk seems well suited for a Bible translator.

After these preparatory studies, he traveled extensively in Palestine, marking each spot of Christ’s life with an outpouring of devotion.   Mystic that he was, he spent five years in the desert of Chalcis so that he might give himself up to prayer, penance and study. Finally, he settled in Bethlehem, where he lived in the cave believed to have been the birthplace of Christ.   Jerome died in Bethlehem and the remains of his body now lie buried in the Basilica of St Mary Major in Rome.

“When the Latin Fathers are represented in a group, Saint Jerome is sometimes in a cardinal’s dress and hat,
although cardinals were not known until three centuries later than his time but as the other Fathers held exalted positions in the Church
and were represented in ecclesiastical costumes and as Saint Jerome held a dignified office in the court of Pope Dalmasius,
it seemed fitting to picture him as a cardinal.
The Venetian painters frequently represented him in a full scarlet robe, with a hood thrown over the head. When thus habited, his symbol was a church in his hand, emblematic of his importance to the universal Church.

Saint Jerome is also seen as a penitent, or again, with a book and pen, attended by a lion.
As a penitent, he is a wretched old man, scantily clothed, with a bald head and neglected beard, a most unattractive figure.

When he is represented as translating the Scriptures, he is in a cell or a cave, clothed in a sombre coloured robe and is writing, or gazing upward for inspiration. In a few instances, an angel is dictating to him. – from Saints in Art, by Clara Irskine Clement

 

 

 

Posted in ART DEI, EUCHARISTIC Adoration

“Art Dei” Series “The Defenders of the Eucharist” by Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish 1577-1640 Issue 1 – 6 June 2017

Art Dei Series

The Defenders of the Eucharist
by Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish 1577-1640
SN 214 Oil on Canvas c1625

Artist:
Peter Paul Rubens, along with the Italian sculptor Gianlorenzo Bernini, was one of the greatest artists of the 17th century.   His canvases can be said to define the scope and style of high baroque painting through their energy, earthy humanity and inventiveness. A devoutly religious man, a man of learning and a connoisseur of art and antiquities, he was also a man of the world who succeeded not only as an artist but as a respected diplomat in the service of Isabella and Albrecht of the Spanish Netherlands.

Travels to Venice where he studied Titian, Veronese & Tintoretto freed his artistic talent from rigid classicism.   While he did incorporate copies of classical statues in his paintings he always avoided the appearance and coldness of stone.   To the contrary, his nudes, for which he became famous, always depicted an ample female form of vitality and good health as well as of sensuousness.   His mastery of color along with his knowledge of antiquity is seen particularly in his mythological paintings.

As court painter and confidant to the Archduchess Isabella Clara Eugenia, Rubens recognized the role art was to play in the Counter Reformation.   His genius found expression in his designs for the Triumph of the Eucharist tapestries which he and his assistants completed between 1625 and 1628.

Knighted by two monarchs and master of a successful workshop, Rubens became rich and famous in his own time. Having executed over 3,000 paintings, woodcuts and engravings of all types, he died the most respected artist of his time in 1640.

Norbert of Xanten, defender of the Holy Eucharist
The Defenders of the Eucharist
by Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish 1577-1640 Including Sts Jerome, Norbert, Thomas Aquinas, Clare, Gregory the Great, Ambrose, Augustine

Subject:
This painting shows seven saints, all of whom were considered to be defenders of the doctrine of Transubstantiation an integral tenet of the Catholic Church.   From the right the figures represent –

(1) St Jerome, (Feast Day 3 September) noted for his translation of the bible from Hebrew into Latin;  

(2) St Norbert, (Feast Day 6 June) a German archbishop and saint, who preached against dissenters who attacked the Christian sacraments and official clergy;  

(3) St Thomas Aquinas, (Feast Day 28 January) a medieval theologian of the Dominican order, whose writings became the basis for much of the doctrine of the Catholic Church;  

(4) St Clare, (Feast Day 11 August) the founder of the Poor Clares, was a Franciscan heroine who repulsed the Saracens at Assisi by confronting them holding the Host in her hands;

(5) Gregory the Great, (Feast Day 3 September) who established, as Pope, the form of the Roman liturgy;

(6) St Ambrose, (Feast Day 7 December) renowned as both theologian and statesman of the Church, who in an age of controversy, was instrumental in crushing Arianism, a doctrine concerning the relationship of God the Father to Christ which was considered heresy and in direct opposition to orthodox teaching about the Trinity; and

(7) St Augustine, (Feast Day 28 August) perhaps the Church’s most celebrated and influential theologian.

Painting:
Seven Saints, including the four Latin Doctors of the Church, progress with great dignity from right to left, their heads seen in different views in a fashion similar to the heads of the Four Evangelists.   The Dove of the Holy Ghost hovers protectively over the saints in the very center of the composition emitting golden light that illuminates the procession. Above the dove, a putti holds two trumpets to herald the message of the Church Fathers.

Leading the procession are Sts. Ambrose, Augustine and Gregory the Great, all wearing elaborate gold copes.   The first two are crowned with bishop’s mitres, while the third wears the papal tiara.   In the center of the procession, St. Clare carries a monstrance and looks directly out at the viewer. Rubens has shown his patroness, the Archduchess Isabella as St. Clare garbed in the black and white habit of the Discalced Carmalites, clothes she wore at the Convent of the Discalzas Reales in Madrid when she was a girl and later as a widow after her husband the Archduke Albert had died in 1621.

St. Thomas Aquinas follows, a large book under his arm wearing a gold chain from which is hung a blazing sun.   Behind Aquinas is a monk in a white habit who is St. Norbert.   Last in line is St. Jerome the fourth Doctor of the Church dressed in red as a cardinal, intensely reading from a large book.   In the centre of the bottom of the composition, below the apron of the “stage” is a burning lamp (the lamp of truth), open books and writing supplies of ink pots and quill pens, all in reference to the writings of the Church Fathers.

All seven saints were known as defenders of the Eucharist, particularly the Four Doctors of the Church who developed the doctrine of transubstantiation and defended it against heretics.

Historical Context:
The cycle of eleven paintings of The Triumph of the Eucharist was commissioned by the Archduchess Isabella who was the daughter of Philip II of Spain and the Governor of the Spanish Netherlands.  It was planned as a gift for the convent of the Descalzas Reales in Madrid in 1625 where it still hangs today.   This Franciscan Order of Poor Clares was one with which Isabella was closely associated.

The series is a mixture of allegory and religious evangelisation intended to promote the worship of the Eucharist, the bread and wine consecrated as the body and blood of Christ and distributed at communion which had been strengthened recently by the Council of Trent and which constituted an important element in Counter Reformation Catholicism.

This was a time of great concern on the part of the Catholic church as it attempted to correct not only the abuses of the clergy but also to reaffirm its tenets / dogma in the face.