Posted in MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Our Lady of the Oak, Tuscany, Italy (1467) and Memorials of the Saints – 10 March

Our Lady of the Oak, Tuscany, Italy (1467) – 10 March:

The Abbot Orsini wrote: “Our Lady of the Vine, Tuscany, Italy. A fine Church, located near Viterbo, occupied at present by Dominicans.”
The city of Viterbo is located at the foot of Mount Cimino in the province of Rome. Viterbo itself currently has 34 separate Parishes, with 8 religious houses for men and 18 houses for sisters. I can find no reference to Our Lady of the Vine, or Madonna della Vito, anywhere in the entire region of Tuscany.
I found two references to Dominican convents. The first was Our Lady of the Oak, or Madonna della Quercia, which also has a Dominican convent attached. The second was Santa Maria dei Gradi, of which only the Church still remains. It was one of the earliest Dominican convents, although it is now used mainly as a retreat house.
The Heavenly Mother, like all mothers, does not discriminate between children, for her help is for everyone. We now continue with Our Lady of the Oak, which is almost surely the place referred to be the good Abbot as Our Lady of the Vine.
At one time in Viterbo there was a certain man named Mastro Baptist Magnano Iuzzante, who was a very God-fearing devotee of the glorious Virgin Mary. He hired a painter named Monetto in the year 1417 to paint an image on a tile of the most glorious Virgin Mary, holding her Son in her arms. Mastro Baptist then lovingly laid the tile on an oak tree that stood at the edge of his vineyard, near the road leading to Bagnaia and along which robbers often awaited to attack unwary travellers.
The image remained there for about 50 years under cover of the oak’s branches and after a while, only a few women who passed by ever stopped to say a prayer and to admire the beauty of a natural tabernacle that a wild vine, which had embraced the oak, had created.

During this period a hermit of Siena, Pier Domenico Alberti, whose hermitage was at the foot of Palanzana, went around the countryside and the nearby towns of Viterbo, saying, “Among Bagnaia and Viterbo there is a treasure.”
Many people, driven by greed, started digging there but found nothing and asked for an explanation from the hermit. Domenico then brought them under the oak tree chosen by the Virgin and pointed to the real treasure, the Madonna. He told them of the day he had decided to take away the sacred image to his hermitage and of how it had returned to the oak.
Dominico was not alone in this experience. A devout woman named Bartolomea often walked past the oak tree and stopped each time to pray to the Blessed Virgin. One day she also decided to take the tile to her home. After saying her evening prayers, Bartolomea went to bed but woke up in the morning to find the image missing. She at first thought that her family had taken it to place it somewhere else but upon learning that this was not so, she ran to the oak tree and saw what she had already guessed – the tile had miraculously returned to its place amid the tendrils of the vine.
Bartolomea tried again but always the sacred image returned to the tree. At first she did not say anything to anyone, to avoid being regarded as lying or insane.
Then, in 1467, during the month of August, the whole region was struck by the greatest scourge of those times: the plague. Everywhere there were the bodies of the dead lying in the deserted streets and there was everywhere, great weeping and mourning. Some then remembered the image painted on the humble tile, and, as if driven by an inexplicable force, went to kneel beneath the oak. Nicholas of Tuccia, an historian, said that on one day 30,000 people were there to beg for mercy.
A few days later the plague ceased and then 40,000 of the faithful came back to thank the Virgin Mary. The people of Viterbo were headed by their Bishop Pietro Gennari and there were many, from other regions.
In early September of the same year another extraordinary event happened.
A good knight of Viterbo had many enemies, as will often happen to a follower of Christ. One day he was surprised by his enemies outside the walls of Viterbo. Alone and unarmed and having no way to deal with the mortal danger, he fled into the nearby woods. Fatigued and desperate to reach his destination, the knight heard the cries of the enemy draw nearer and nearer. Eventually he arrived at the oak with the sacred image of Mary, where he fell at her feet with great faith and embraced the trunk of the tree, putting his life into the hands of his Heavenly Mother.
The knight’s enemies reached the oak but were surprised that they could no longer see the knight. They began to look behind every tree and bush but not one could see him since he had disappeared before their very eyes. Failing to find him after a long time spent in searching, they gave up in disgust.
Then the knight, after thanking the Virgin Mary, returned to Viterbo and told everyone what had happened. Bartolomea heard his tale and encouraged by his words, she described the miracles to which she had been a witness. They told everyone what had happened to them with so much enthusiasm and devotion. The stories spread like wildfire and many people, coming from the most diverse regions of Italy, flocked to the feet of the oak to implore help from the Blessed Virgin.

It was decided to build an Altar and then a Chapel of planks before Pope Paul II gave the necessary permission to build a small Church in 1467. Many Popes and Saints have been devotees of the image, including St Charles Borromeo, St Paul of the Cross, St Ignatius Loyola, Saint Crispin of Viterbo and St Maximilian Kolbe, among many others.
On 20 January 1944, during the bombing of Viterbo, a squadron of 12 bombers headed for the oak but upon arriving at their destination, inexplicably veered to the right and the bombs dropped, did not destroying anything outside of the Church, which was empty. The remains of the bombs, 3 large chunks, are kept behind the Altar of the Madonna.
In 1986, Pope John Paul II proclaimed Our Lady of the Oak, Patroness of the new Diocese of Viterbo, formed from the union of those of Viterbo, Tuscania, Montefiascone, Acquapendente and Bagnoregio.
Even today the Virgin protects her devotees and the devotion to the Blessed Virgin of the Oak is very strong.
Every year on the second Sunday of September, the faithful commemorate the “Benefits from the Sacred Image of Our Lady of the Oak.” Many cities and towns, with their brotherhoods, participate in the procession of thanksgiving, called the “Covenant of Love “ The Mayor of Viterbo, on behalf of all participants, renews the Consecration made of old by the whole region, back in 1467.

The Dominicans’ story of Our Lady of the Oak here:
https://www.dominicanajournal.org/wp-content/files/old-journal-archive/vol29/no3/dominicanav29n3ourladytheoak.pdf

__
St Alexander of Apema
St Anastasia the Patrician
St Andrew of Strumi
St Attalas of Bobbio
St Blanchard of Nesle-la-Réposte
St Caius of Apema
St Cordratus of Nicomedië
St Droctoveus of Paris
Bl Elias del Socorro Nieves
St Emilian of Lagny
St Failbhe the Little
St Gustav the Hermit
St Himelin
Bl Jean-Marie Joseph Lataste
St John Ogilvie SJ (1579-1615 died aged 36) MARTYR
Biography:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-st-john-ogilvie/
St John Ogilvie, his Rosary and the Baron: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/st-john-
ogilvie-sj-10-march/

Bl John of Vallombrosa
St Kessog
St Macarius of Jerusalem
St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)
About St Marie:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-st-marie-eugenie-de-jesus-1817- 1898/
St Peter of Veroli
St Rufinus of Nicomedië
St Sannudius of Bagensena
St Saturninus of Nicomedië
St Sedna of Ossory
St Silvester of Ireland
St Pope Simplicius (?- 483)
His Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-saint-pope-simplicius-483/
St Victor of North Africa
Bl Wirnto of Formbach

Anonymous Martyrs of Persia – A group of 42 Christians martyred in Persia in the 4th century.

Forty Martyrs of Sebaste, Armenia (Died 320) – Forty Christian soldiers of the Thunderstruck Legion of the Imperial Roman army who were tortured and murdered for their faith during the persecutions of Emperor Licinius. They were exposed naked on a frozen pond to freeze to death at Sebaste, Armenia in 320 and their bodies afterward were burned.

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, GOD ALONE!, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on DISCIPLESHIP, QUOTES on FAITH, QUOTES on HOPE, QUOTES on HUMILITY, QUOTES on MISSION, QUOTES on OBEDIENCE, QUOTES on PERSEVERANCE, QUOTES on PRAYER, QUOTES on SANCTITY, QUOTES on SILENCE, QUOTES on SUFFERING, QUOTES on VIRTUE, SAINT of the DAY, SPEAKING of ....., The LAST THINGS, The WILL of GOD, The WORD

Quote/s of the Day – 22 July – “But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb…” Perseverance

Quote/s of the Day – 22 July – Feast of St Mary of Magdala, Readings: Song of Solomon 3:1-4 or 2 Corinthians 5:14-17, Psalm 63:2-6, 8-9, John 20:1-2, 11-18

Speaking of:  Perseverance

“But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb…”

John 20:11

john 20 11 but mary stood weeping outside the tomb - 22 july 2020

“And will not God vindicate his elect,
who cry to him day and night?”

Luke 18:7

luke-18-7-and-will-not-god-vindicate-his-elect-who-cry-to-him-day-and-night-16-nov-2019 and 22 july 2020

Lord, if Your people still have need
of my services,
I will not avoid the toil.
Your will be done.
I have fought the good fight long enough.
Yet, if You bid me to continue to hold
the battle line, in defence of Your camp,
I will never beg to be excused
from failing strength.
I will do the work You entrust to me.
While You command,
I will fight beneath Your banner.
Amen

St Martin of Tours (c 316-397)

lord if your people still have need of my services - st martin of tours 22 july2020 (2)

“Our pilgrimage on earth cannot be exempt from trial.
We progress by means of trial.
No-one knows himself except through trial,
or receives a crown,
except after victory,
or strives,
except against an enemy or temptations.”

St Augustine (354-430)
Father and Doctor of Grace

our pilgrimage on earth cannot be exempt from trial - st augustine 22 july 2020

“For now, let us persevere, children,
dear children, let us be patient for a little,
brothers, dear brothers.…
Who will be crowned without having fought?
Who will go to rest if he is not tired (cf. 2 Tim 2:5-6)?
Who will gather the fruits of life,
without having planted virtues in his soul?
Cultivate them, prepare the earth with the greatest care,
take trouble over it,
sweat over it, children, God’s workers,
imitators of the angels,
competitors with incorporeal beings,
lights for those who are in the world (cf. Phil 2:15)!”

St Theodore the Studite (759-826)
Monk

Catechesis 28

for now let us perseverd children - st theodore the studite 22 july 2020

“Don’t sow your desires
in someone else’s garden,
just cultivate your own, as best you can;
don’t long to be other than what you are
but desire to be thoroughly what you are.
Direct your thoughts,
to being very good at that
and to bearing the crosses, little or great,
that you will find there.
Believe me, this is the most important
and least understood point to the spiritual life.
We all love according to what is our taste,
few people like what is according to their duty
or to God’s liking.
What is the use of building castles in Spain
when we have to live in France?”

dont-sow-your-desires-st-francis-de-sales-24-jan-2018-24-jan-2020 and 22 july 2020

It is not then a case for tears,
that we have so much work to do for our souls,
for we need great courage to go ever onwards
(since we must never stop)
and much resolution to restrain our desires.
Observe carefully this precept,
that all the Saints have given to those who would emulate them –
to speak little, or not at all,
of yourself and your own interests.”

St Francis de Sales (1567-1622)

Doctor of the Church

the-work-is-never-finished-st-francis-de-sales-27-march-2019-and-24-jan-2020 and 22 july 2020

“Love never says
‘I have done enough.’”

St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

love-never-says-i-have-done-enough-st-marie-eugenie-de-jesus-10-march-2020 and 22 july 2020

“On the last day, we will not be asked
if we accomplished great deeds,
or been acclaimed by men,
rather we will be asked
if we followed His will,
in the state and condition,
to which we were called.”

The Eighth Circular Letter

St Guido Maria Conforti (1865-1931)

on-the-last-day-st-guido-maria-conforti-5-nov-2019and 22 july 2020

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on PERSEVERANCE, QUOTES on SANCTITY, QUOTES on SUFFERING, QUOTES on TEMPTATION, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March – Our pilgrimage on earth

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March – Tuesday of the Second Week of Lent and The Memorial of St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

“Our pilgrimage on earth cannot be exempt from trial.
We progress by means of trial.
No-one knows himself except through trial,
or receives a crown,
except after victory,
or strives,
except against an enemy or temptations.”

St Augustine (354-430)
Father and Doctor of the Church

our pilgrimae on earth cannot be exempt from trial - st augustine - 10 march 2020

“Love never says
‘I have done enough.’”

St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

love never says i have done enough - st marie eugenie de jesus 10 march 2020

Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT SJ- Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 10 March

St Alexander of Apema
St Anastasia the Patrician
St Andrew of Strumi
St Attalas of Bobbio
St Blanchard of Nesle-la-Réposte
St Caius of Apema
St Cordratus of Nicomedië
St Droctoveus of Paris
Bl Elias del Socorro Nieves
St Emilian of Lagny
St Failbhe the Little
St Gustav the Hermit
St Himelin
Bl Jean-Marie Joseph Lataste
St John Ogilvie SJ (1579-1615 died aged 36) MARTYR
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-st-john-ogilvie/
St John Ogilvie, his Rosary and the Baron: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/st-john-
ogilvie-sj-10-march/

Bl John of Vallombrosa
St Kessog
St Macarius of Jerusalem
St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898) 
Her life:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-st-marie-eugenie-de-jesus-1817- 1898/
St Peter of Veroli
St Rufinus of Nicomedië
St Sannudius of Bagensena
St Saturninus of Nicomedië
St Sedna of Ossory
St Silvester of Ireland
St Pope Simplicius (?- 483)
St Victor of North Africa
Bl Wirnto of Formbach

Anonymous Martyrs of Persia – A group of 42 Christians martyred in Persia in the 4th century.

Forty Martyrs of Armenia – Forty Christian soldiers of the Thunderstruck Legion of the Imperial Roman army who were tortured and murdered for their faith during the persecutions of Emperor Licinius.   They were exposed naked on a frozen pond to freeze to death at Sebaste, Armenia in 320 and their bodies afterward were burned.

Posted in PRAYERS of the SAINTS, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on LOVE, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 10 March – “I am looking at my Lord. It is in looking at Him, that we learn how to love.”

Thought for the Day – 10 March – The Memorial of St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

Marie Eugenie led the Assumption for fifty-five years.   Her life was full.   Her first priority was for her sisters:  their happiness, their formation, their work.   She was concerned for their health – more than two hundred sisters were to die before she did, often young and of tuberculosis.

She was constantly travelling from community to community, encouraging, consoling and challenging.   As the Congregation became known, she was invited to start more and more communities.   She saw her work as being always in and for the Church and her loyalty to it was absolute.

The last few years of her life were spent in increasing retirement.   Gradually her health failed.   Her legs refused to carry her and her speech also slowed, so that at the end she could only occasionally say a few words.   Those around her were struck by her gentleness and patience.   One day she managed to say –

“I am looking at my Lord.

It is in looking at Him, that we learn how to love.”

She died, surrounded by her sisters, on the 10th March 1898.i am looking at my lord - st marie eugenie de jesus 10 march 2019

Credo of St Marie Eugenie of Jesus

I believe that our earth is a place of glory for God.
I believe that the destiny of the world is the Reign of Jesus Christ.
I believe that each of us has a mission on earth.
I believe that the aim of our religion, is not just our own eternal happiness
but to let God use us, to make the Gospel known and loved.
I believe that each one enters into God’s plan by prayer, by action and by the cross
And that to refuse His call, is to refuse our own happiness.
I believe the aim of Christian education, is to make Jesus Christ known
As the liberator and ruler of the world..

St Marie Eugénie de Jésus, Pray for Us!st marie eugenie de jesus pray for us 10 march 2019

Posted in QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on FRIENDSHIP, QUOTES on GRATITUDE, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on PRAYER, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March – St Marie Eugénie de Jésus

Quote/s of the Day – 10 March – The Memorial of St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

“Be the cotton
between sheets of glass,
to keep others, from shattering.”

“Transform
everything into
Praise and Thanksgiving!”

“Love never says
‘I have done enough.'”

St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)quotes st marie eugenie de jesus 10 march 2019.jpg

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, VATICAN Resources

Saint of the Day – 10 March – St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898)

Saint of the Day – 10 March – St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898) aged 80 – Foundress of the Religious of the Assumption – Religious, – born 26 August 1817 at Metz, Moselle, France as Eugenie Milleret de Brou (de Bron) and died on 10 March 1898 at Auteuil, Hauts-de-Seine, France of natural causes.   Patronages – the Religious of the Assumption and Students.   St Marie Eugénie is also known as Anne-Eugénie Milleret de Brou, Eugénie Milleret de Brou, Eugénie Milleret de Bron, Marie Eugénie Milleret de Brou, Mere Marie Eugénie.   She was Beatified on 9 February 1975 by St Pope Paul VI and Canonised by Pope Benedict XVI on 3 June 2007.marie-de-jesus-milleret-oung.1.2.jpg

Anne Marie Eugenie was born in 1817 in Metz after Napoleon’s complete defeat and the restoration of the Monarchy.   She belonged to a non-believing and financially comfortable family and it seemed unlikely that she would trace a new spiritual path across the Church of France.

Her father, follower of Voltaire and a liberal, was making his fortune in the banking world and in politics.   Eugenie’s mother provided the sensitive Eugenie with an education, which strengthened her character and gave her a strong sense of duty.   Family life developed her intellectual curiosity and a romantic spirit, an interest in social questions and a broad world view.

Like her contemporary, George Sand, Anne Eugenie went to Mass on feast days and received the Sacraments of initiation, as was the custom but without any real commitment.   However, her First Communion was a great mystical experience that foretold the secret of her future.   She did not grasp its prophetic meaning until much later when she recognised it as her path towards total belonging to Jesus Christ and the Church.

Her youth was happy but not without suffering.   She was affected when still a child by the death of an elder brother and a baby sister.   Her health was delicate and a fall from a horse left serious consequences.   Eugenie was mature for her age and learnt how to hide her feelings and to face up to events.   Later, after a prosperous period for her father, she experienced the failure of his banks, the misunderstanding and eventual separation of her parents and the loss of all security.   She had to leave her family home and go to Paris while Louis, closest to her in age and faithful companion went to live with their father.   Eugenie went to Paris with the mother she adored, only to see her die from cholera after a few hours of illness, leaving her alone at the age of fifteen in a society that was worldly and superficial.   Searching in anguish and almost desperate for the truth, she arrived at her conversion thirsty for the Absolute and open to the Transcendent.

When she was nineteen, Anne Eugenie attended the Lenten Conferences at Notre Dame in Paris, preached by the young Abbe Lacordaire (1802–1861), already well-known for his talent as orator.   Lacordaire was a former disciple of Lamennais ­– haunted by the vision of a renewed Church with a special place in the world.   He understood his time and wanted to change it.   He understood young people, their questions and their desires, their idealism and their ignorance of both Christ and the Church.   His words touched Eugenie’s heart, answered her many questions and aroused her generosity.

Conference_Notre-Dame_Lacordaire
Fr Lacordaire preaching his Lenten Conferences from the elevated pulpit at Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris, 1845.

Portrait_of_Dominique_Lacordaire
Fr Henri-Dominique Lacordaire OP, at the convent of Sainte-Sabine in Rome, by Théodore Chassériau (1840)

Eugenie envisaged Christ as the universal liberator and His kingdom on earth established as a peaceful and just society.   “I was truly converted, she wrote, and I was seized by a longing to devote all my strength or rather all my weakness to the Church which, from that moment, I saw as alone holding the key to the knowledge and achievement of all that is good.”

Just at this time, another preacher, also a former disciple of Lamennais, appeared on the scene.   In the confessional, Father Combalot recognised that he had encountered a chosen soul who was designated to be the foundress of the Congregation he had dreamt of for a long time.   He persuaded Eugenie to undertake his work by insisting that this Congregation was willed by God who had chosen her to establish it.   He convinced her that only by education could she evangelise minds, make families truly Christian and thus transform the society of her time.   Anne Eugenie accepted the project as God’s will for her and allowed herself to be guided by the Abbe Combalot.

At twenty-two, Marie Eugenie became foundress of the Religious of the Assumption, dedicated to consecrate their whole life and strength to extending the Kingdom of Christ in themselves and in the world.   In 1839, Mademoiselle Eugenie Milleret, with two other young women, began a life of prayer and study in a flat at rue Ferou near the church of St Sulpice in Paris.   In 1841, under the patronage of Madame de Chateaubriand, Lacordaire, Montalembert and their friends, the sisters opened their first school.   In a relatively short time there were sixteen sisters of four nationalities in the community.MME_middle age.jpg

Marie Eugenie and the first sisters wanted to link the ancient and the new – to unite the past treasures of the Church’s spirituality and wisdom with a type of religious life and education able to satisfy the demands of modern minds.   It was a matter of respecting the values of the period and at the same time, making the Gospel values penetrate the rising culture of a new industrial and scientific era.   The spirituality of the Congregation, centred on Christ and the Incarnation, was both deeply contemplative and dedicated to apostolic action.   It was a life given to the search for God and the love and service of others.

Marie Eugenie’s long life covered almost the whole of the 19th century.   She loved her times passionately and took an active part in their history.   Progressively, she channelled all her energy and gifts in tending and extending the Congregation, which became her life work.   God gave her sisters and many friends.   One of the first sisters was Irish, a mystic and her intimate friend whom she called at the end of her life, “half of myself.” Kate O’Neill, called Mother Therese Emmanuel in religion, is considered as a co-foundress.   Father Emmanuel d’Alzon, became Marie Eugenie’s spiritual director soon after the foundation, was a father, brother or friend according to the seasons.   In 1845, he founded the Augustinians of the Assumption and the two founders helped each other in a multitude of ways over a period of forty years.   Both had a gift for friendship and they inspired many lay people to work with them and the Church.   Together, as they followed Christ and laboured with Him, the religious and laity traced the path of the Assumption and took their place in the great cloud of witnesses.Marie-Eugénie âgée noir et blanc-old.JPG

In the last years of her life, Mother Marie Eugenie experienced a progressive physical weakening, which she lived in silence and humility – a life totally centred on Christ.   She received the Eucharist for the last time on 9 March 1898 and on the 10th, she gently passed to the Lord.   She was beatified by Pope Paul VI on 9 February 1975 in Rome.

Today, the Religious of the Assumption are present in 34 countries – 8 in Europe, 5 in Asia, 10 in America and 11 in Africa. Almost 1,200 sisters form 170 communities throughout the world.

The Lay Assumption – Assumption Together – made up of Friends of the Assumption and Communities or Fraternities of the Assumption, are numerous – thousands of Friends and hundreds of Lay Assumption committed to live according to the Way of Life….Vatican.va

Posted in IGNATIAN/JESUIT SJ- Reflections, Jesuit Saints and more, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 10 March

The First Sunday of Lent, Year C

St Alexander of Apema
St Anastasia the Patrician
St Andrew of Strumi
St Attalas of Bobbio
St Blanchard of Nesle-la-Réposte
St Caius of Apema
St Cordratus of Nicomedië
St Droctoveus of Paris
Bl Elias del Socorro Nieves
St Emilian of Lagny
St Failbhe the Little
St Gustav the Hermit
St Himelin
Bl Jean-Marie Joseph Lataste
St John Ogilvie SJ (1579-1615 died aged 36) MARTYR
Biography: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/saint-of-the-day-10-march-st-john-ogilvie/
St John Ogilvie, his Rosary and the Baron: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/st-john-ogilvie-sj-10-march/

 

Bl John of Vallombrosa
St Kessog
St Macarius of Jerusalem
St Marie Eugénie de Jésus (1817-1898) aged 80
St Peter of Veroli
St Rufinus of Nicomedië
St Sannudius of Bagensena
St Saturninus of Nicomedië
St Sedna of Ossory
St Silvester of Ireland
St Simplicius, Pope
St Victor of North Africa
Bl Wirnto of Formbach

Anonymous Martyrs of Persia – A group of 42 Christians martyred in Persia in the 4th century.
Forty Martyrs of Armenia – Forty Christian soldiers of the Thunderstruck Legion of the Imperial Roman army who were tortured and murdered for their faith during the persecutions of Emperor Licinius. They were exposed naked on a frozen pond to freeze to death at Sebaste, Armenia in 320 and their bodies afterward were burned.