Posted in ArchAngels and Angels, FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Twenty Second Sunday after Pentecost, Beata Vergine delle Grazie / The Blessed Virgin of Grace, Udine, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy (1479) and Memorials of the Saints – 24 October

Twenty Second Sunday after Pentecost
Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Saint Raphael the Archangel
The Feast day of Saint Raphael was included for the first time in the General Roman Calendar in 1921, for celebration on 24 October. With the 1969 revision of the General Roman Calendar, the Feast was transferred to September 29 for celebration together with Archangels Saints Michael and Gabriel.

Beata Vergine delle Grazie / The Blessed Virgin of Grace, Udine, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy (1479) – Fourth Sunday of October:

When Sir John Emo was serving as Venetian Ambassador to Constantinople, Sultan Mohammed II gave him a Byzantine-style icon of the Virgin nursing the Child.
In 1479, Sir Emo became Lieutenant of Udine, a City in northeast Italy then under the Republic of Venice, bringing the icon with him to the governor’s castle. Not long afterward, one of the palace cooks nearly lost a hand in the kitchen but it healed when touched to the image. News of the miracle inspired popular devotion, so Sir Emo decided to move the image to the Church of Sts. Gervais and Protasius, where it entered in procession on 8 September 1479. By 1495, the Church was too small for all the pilgrims and a new Sanctuary was begun, consecrated to Our Lady of Graces and run by the Servants of Mary. On 6 September 1870 the Church Crowned the icon; in 1922, it named the Shrine a Minor Basilica.

On the fourth Sunday of October, the City both fulfills and renews, a vow made during the plague of 1555. The Beata Vergine delle Grazie is also credited with saving the region from the plague of 1599, the cholera of 1836 and the bombardment of the war in1944.

St Anthony Mary Claret CMF (1807-1870) Known as “The Spiritual Father of Cuba.” In the first years, records show, that he Confirmed 100,000 people and performed 9,000 Sacramental Marriages.Archbishop of Cuba, one of the Fathers of the First Vatican Council,Confessor to the Queen of Spain, Missionary, Founder of the Congregation of Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, commonly called the Claretians, Confessor, Mystic, Social Reformer, Spiritual Director, Writer, Publisher, Preacher, Apostle of Charity. He was declared venerable by Pope Leo XIII in 1899. He was Beatified in 1934 and in 1950, Canonised by Pope Pius XII. His heart is incorrupt.
The 1969 revision of the calendar moved St Anthony Feast to the day of his death, 24 October (from the 23rd) which had been the Feast of Saint Raphael the Archangel since 1921.
(Optional Memorial)
About St Anthony Mary here:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-st-anthony-mary-claret-1807-1870-cmf/

Bl Amado García Sánchez
St Audactus of Thibiuca
St Cadfarch
St Ciriacus of Hierapolis
St Claudian of Hierapolis
St Ebregislus of Cologne
St Felix of Thibiuca
St Fortunatus of Thibiuca
St Fromundus of Coutances
St Giuse Lê Dang Thi

Blessed Giuseppe Baldo (1843 – 1915) Priest and Founder of both the Little Daughters of Saint Joseph (1894) and the Sisters of Charity of Saint Mary (1882), Apostle of Charity, Founder of numerous charitable institutions.
His Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-blessed-giuseppe-baldo-1843-1915/
St Januarius of Thibiuca

St Luigi Guanella (1842-1915) “Servant of Charity,” Priest, Founder the Daughters of Saint Mary of Providence (1890) and the Servants of Charity (24 March 1908) alongside his friends Fr David Albertario (1846-1902) and Blessed Giuseppe Toniolo (1845-1918). Apostle of Charity, Marian devotee, Eucharistic Adorer and passionate promoter.
Guanella also founded the Pious Union of Saint Joseph (1914) with his supporter and first member St Pope Pius X.
St Luigi’s Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2018/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-st-luigi-guanella-1842-1915-servant-of-charity/

St Maglorius of Wales
St Marcius of Monte Cassino
St Martin of Vertou

St Proclus of Constantinople (Died c 446) Archbishop of Constantinople, Confessor, Defender of the Church and of the Blessed Virgin, Writer, renowned Preacher.
About St Prochus:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-saint-proclus-of-constantinople-died-c-446/

St Senoch
St Senócus of Tours
St Septimus of Thibiuca

Martyrs of Ephesus – 3 saints: Three Christians martyred together. All we know about them are the names Mark, Sotericus and Valentina.
They were stoned to death near Ephesus, Asia Minor (in modern Turkey). Their relics are enshrined on the island of Tasos.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 24 October – Saint Proclus of Constantinople (Died c 446)

Saint of the Day – 24 October – Saint Proclus of Constantinople (Died c 446) Archbishop of Constantinople, Confessor, Defender of the Church and of the Blessed Virgin, Writer, renowned Preacher – born in Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey) and died in c 446 in the area of modern Turkey of natural causes. He defended the divine maternity of Mary, fought against the heresy of Nestorius and, after Nestorius’ deposition, became Bishop of Constantinople.
Roman Martyrology: In Constantinople, St Proclus, Bishop, who courageously proclaimed Blessed Mary as the Mother of God and brought the body of St John Chrysostom back from exile to the city with a solemn procession, thus deserving the title of the Ecumenical Council of Chalcedon, as “Great.”

The friend and disciple of Saint John Chrysostom, Proclus became secretary to Archbishop Atticus of Constantinople (406–425), who ordained him Deacon and Priest. Atticus’ successor, Sisinnius I (426–427), consecrated him Bishop of Cyzicus but the Nestorians there, refused to receive him and he remained at Constantinople. On the death of Sisinnius, the infamous Nestorius succeeded as Archbishop of Constantinople (428–431) and early in 429, on a festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Proclus preached his celebrated sermon on the Incarnation, which was later inserted in the beginning of the Acts of the Council of Ephesus. Below is an excerpt from St Proclus sermon:

“Our present gathering in honour of the Most Holy Virgin inspires me, brethren, to offer her a word of praise, of benefit also for those who have come to this holy celebration.  It is a praise of women, a glorification of their gender, which (glory) she brings to it, she who is both Mother and Virgin at the same time.

O desired and wondrous gathering!  O nature, celebrate that whereby honour is rendered to woman!  Rejoice, O human race, that in which the Virgin is glorified.  “But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound” [Romans 5:20].  The Holy Mother of God and Virgin Mary has gathered us here.  She is the pure treasure of virginity, the intended paradise of the Second Adam, the place where the union of natures (divine and human) was accomplished and the Counsel of salvific reconciliation was affirmed.

Who has ever seen, who has ever heard, that the Limitless God would dwell within a womb?  He Whom the Heavens cannot circumscribe is not limited by the womb of a Virgin!  He Who is born of woman is not just God and He is not just Man.  He Who is born has made woman the gateway of salvation.  Where evil poured forth its poison, bringing on disobedience, there the Word made a living temple for Himself, bringing obedience there.  From the place where the archsinner Cain sprang forth, there Christ the Redeemer of the human race was born without seed.  The Lover of Mankind did not disdain to be born of woman, since She gave Him life (in His human nature).  He was not subject to impurity by being in the womb which He Himself arrayed free from all harm.  If this Mother had not remained a Virgin, then the Child born of her might be a mere man and the birth would not be miraculous in any way.  Since she remained a Virgin after giving birth, then how is He Who is born not God?  It is an inexplicable mystery, for He Who passed through locked doors without hindrance was born in an inexplicable manner.  Thomas cried out, “My Lord, and my God!” [John 20:28], thus confessing the union of two natures in Him.” 

When Archbishop Maximianus (431–434) died on Holy Thursday, Proclus was immediately enthroned by the permission of the Emperor Theodosius II and the Bishops gathered at Constantinople. His first care was the funeral of his predecessor and he then sent to both Bishops, St Cyril of Alexandria and St John of Antioch, the usual synodical letters announcing his appointment, both of whom approved of it.

In 436 the Bishops of Armenia consulted Proclus upon certain doctrines prevalent in their country and attributed to Theodore of Mopsuestia, asking for their condemnation. Proclus replied the next year in the celebrated letter known as the Tome to the Armenians, which he sent to the Eastern Bishops, asking them to sign it and to join in condemning the doctrines arraigned by the Armenians. They approved the letters but from admiration of Theodore, hesitated to condemn the doctrines attributed to him. Proclus replied that while he desired the extracts subjoined to his Tome to be condemned, he had not attributed them to Theodore or any individual, not desiring the condemnation of any single person.

A rescript from Theodosius procured by Proclus, declaring his wish that all should live in peace and that no imputation should be made against anyone who died in communion with the church, appeased the storm. The whole affair showed, conspicuously, the moderation and tact of Proclus. In 438, he transferred the relics of his old master, Saint John Chrysostom, from Comana back to Constantinople, where he interred them with great honour in the Church of the Twelve apostles. This action reconciled to the church those of Saint John’s adherents, who had separated themselves in consequence of his unjust removal as Archbishop.

In 439, at the request of a deputation from Caesarea in Cappadocia, Proclus selected as their new Bishop Thalassius, who was about to be appointed praetorian prefect of the East.

Proclus died most probably in October, 446. He appears to have been wise, moderate and conciliatory, desirous, while strictly adhering to Orthodoxy himself, to win over those who differed from him by persuasion rather than force.

The works of Proclus consist of 20 sermons. Five were published by Cardinal Mai, of which 3 are preserved only in a Syriac version, the Greek being lost; 7 letters, along with several addressed to him by other persons and a few fragments of other letters and sermons.

Proclus was cited by St John Henry Newman for his work on Mariology and his strong support of the conciliar dogma on the Mother of God. With his Marian doctrine, St Proclus opened the door to the further development of Marian doctrine during the period following the Council of Ephesus. Thanks to him, the faithful understood in a clearer way the great dignity of Mary, the power of her intercession and the need to honour her with special devotion.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 24 October

St Anthony Mary Claret CMF (1807-1870) (Optional Memorial)
About St Anthony Mary here:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-st-anthony-mary-claret-1807-1870-cmf/

Bl Amado García Sánchez
St Audactus of Thibiuca
St Cadfarch
St Ciriacus of Hierapolis
St Claudian of Hierapolis
St Ebregislus of Cologne
St Felix of Thibiuca
St Fortunatus of Thibiuca
St Fromundus of Coutances
St Giuse Lê Dang Thi
Blessed Giuseppe Baldo (1843 – 1915)
His Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-blessed-giuseppe-baldo-1843-1915/
St Januarius of Thibiuca
St Luigi Guanella (1842-1915)
St Luigi’s Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2018/10/24/saint-of-the-day-24-october-st-luigi-guanella-1842-1915-servant-of-charity/

St Maglorius of Wales
St Marcius of Monte Cassino
St Martin of Vertou
St Proclus of Constantinople (Died c 446) Bishop
St Senoch
St Senócus of Tours
St Septimus of Thibiuca

Martyrs of Ephesus – 3 saints: Three Christians martyred together. All we know about them are the names Mark, Sotericus and Valentina.
They were stoned to death near Ephesus, Asia Minor (in modern Turkey). Their relics are enshrined on the island of Tasos.