Posted in MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Our Lady of Genazzano (1467) / Our Lady of Good Counsel and Memorials of the Saints – 26 April

Monday of the Fourth Week of Easter +2021

Our Lady of Genazzano (1467) / Our Lady of Good Counsel (Memorial) – 26 April:

George Kastrioti Skanderbeg (1405–1467), also known as Iskander, or by his more colourful title, the Dragon of Albania. He was a great warrior and leader of the people of Albania who fought against the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into his Kingdom. An invincible opponent of Islam, the reason for his successes, was no secret – he “loved the sanctuary of Mary with a devoted, enthusiastic love and Mary in return, not only made him a model of Christian perfection but also gave him, an invincible power, which preserved not only Albania but also Christendom during his reign.”
There was at this time, a miraculous painting located in the town of Scutari, which was the Capital City of Albania. Our Lady of Scutari, now known as Our Lady of Good Counsel and Our Lady of Genazzano, is an image of Our Lady holding her Divine Son which had been painted on a thin sheet of plaster by an unknown hand. This portrait, reputed to date from the time of the Apostles of Christ, was greatly venerated and beloved by the faithful Albanian people. It was Our Lady of Scutari who had consoled and preserved Iskander through all his trials.
After his victories, Iskander went to kneel before the image of Our Lady of Scutari, thanking and publicly praising her for his success. “He was a hero formed in the same school as all those who derive their strength from their devotion to the Blessed Virgin. Like a new Saint Fernando III, King of Castile, Scanderbeg was, under the guidance of Mary, as gentle in peace as he was terrible in war. The good Christian Prince was often seen at her feet to beg the protection of his Lady in his greatest afflictions.”
Pope Nicholas V called Iskander “the champion and shield of Christendom,” which was true, although it was the Blessed Virgin Mary who protected her champion and granted him his victories. The Prince and unvanquished warrior, whose strength of soul gave his compatriots fortitude to throw off their lethargy, courage to rise up against the oppressive infidels, daring to despise death and thus expel them from their country, moved his subjects not only by example but also by his unbreakable faith, his ardent charity and his unshakable hope. Scanderbeg was God’s sword against the enemies of the holy Catholic Faith, the impregnable defensive wall protecting His realm.
At the end of his life, physically exhausted from his labours, Iskander sensed that his death was near. He went one last time to visit Our Lady of Scutari at her Shrine and then retired to the City of Lesh to die. There he won a final battle against the Turks before he laid down and gave up his soul to God. He had ended his life heroically as a powerful defender of the Catholic faith and of Christendom.
Shortly after Iskander’s death, the Ottoman army invaded Albania again. Without their invincible champion, it was only a matter of time before the Capital was taken. The Blessed Virgin revealed to two pious men that her image would not be desecrated and told them to prepare themselves for a long journey to follow the fresco when it left Albania. The picture then moved away from the wall, seemingly of its own accord and floated into the air.
As the pair followed the image of Jesus and Mary, it was hidden in a cloud and went out over the waters of the Adriatic sea. Full of confidence in Our Lady, the men stepped upon the water, which miraculously supported them and so they continued to follow the image until they made land along the coast of Italy. At that point they lost sight of the cloud.
It was not long before they learned where the image had gone. The cloud was seen again by the people of Genazzano, when they looked up into the sky to find the source of the heavenly music, that suddenly reached their ears. They watched dumbfounded as the little cloud descended and came to rest where it can still be seen today, floating before a wall of the Church of the Mother of Good Counsel in Genazzano. The image indeed floats before the wall, for it is not attached or supported in any way.

A hundred years later Pope Paul III had the picture studied and authenticated; Innocent IX had it crowned; many other Popes have granted favoUrs to the Shrine. As late as 1936 a commission formed to study the picture, reported, if struck a slight blow, it reacts as if it were hollow; if set in motion, it oscillates visibly. Pope Leo XIII raised the Sanctuary to the dignity of a Basilica and had the invocation, “Mother of Good Counsel” added to the Litany of Loretto. Blessed Pope Pius IX had a great devotion to Our Lady under this title – he offered his first Mass before its image; in 1864 he made a pilgrimage to Genazzano to have counsel of her who is “Seat of Wisdom.” He kept her image in his study and fostered a cult to Mary under this title; thus he exemplified the filial confidence of all true sons of Mary.*

Our Lady of Good Counsel by Pasquale Sarullo, 19th century.

The Augustinian Order contributed to the spread of this devotion internationally. In 1753, Pope Benedict XIV established the Pious Union of Our Lady of Good Counsel. Leo XIII, who was himself a member of the pious union, was deeply attached to this devotion.

Among her noted clients have been St Aloysius Gonzaga, St Alphonsus Liguori, St John Bosco and Blessed Stephen Bellesini.

There have been numerous miracles at the shrine where Mary took refuge after the death of her champion in Albania. Through this image of Our Lady of Genazzano and throughout many long ages, she has been caring for her children on earth. As the Mother of God, she has the ability to truly help us. Indeed, it is her ardent desire to support us and counsel us in our need. Pope Leo XIII instructed us to “follow her counsels!” and, like so many saints and Catholic heroes, we would profit greatly if we did so!

Bl Alda of Siena
St Antoninus of Rome
St Basileus of Amasea
St Clarence of Venice
St Claudius of Rome

St Pope Cletus (c 25-c 89) 3rd Bishop of Rome and Martyr
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-st-pope-cletus/

St Cyrinus of Rome
St Exuerantia of Troyes
Bl Gregory of Besians
Bl Juli Junyer Padern
St Lucidius of Verona
St Pope Marcellinus (Died 304) Martyr

St Paschasius Radbertus (785–865) Monk, Spiritual writer
His life:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-saint-paschasius-radbertus-785-865/

St Pelligrino of Foggia
St Peter of Braga (Died c 50) Bishop and Martyr
St Primitive of Gabi

St Rafael Arnáiz Barón (1911-1938) Oblate of the Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (Trappist)
About this memorable Saint:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-st-rafael-arnaiz-baron-o-c-s-o-1911-1938/

St Richarius of Celles (c 560-645) Priest and Confessor
St Richarius’ Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-st-richarius-of-celles-c-560-645/

Bl Stanislaw Kubista
St Trudpert of Munstertal
St William of Foggia
Bl Wladyslaw Goral

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 26 April – St Richarius of Celles (c 560-645)

Saint of the Day – 26 April – St Richarius of Celles (c 560-645) Priest, founder of Monasteries, spiritual adviser, apostle of the poor, the sick and prisoners and finally, a Hermit – born at Centula, France and died on 26 April 645 at Foret-Moutier, France of natural causes.  In France he is known as St Riquier.   Patronages – the cities of Saint-Riquier, Centula and Saint-Riquier-en-Rivière in France.RICHARIUS-Z-CENTULE

Richarius was born a pagan in the late 6th century in the county of Ponthieu near Amiens in Picardy in the north-west of France.   According to the vita written by St Alcuin, Richarius gave shelter to two Welsh missionaries, Caidocus and Frechorius, who were treated with great hostility by the local people who blamed the strangers for crop failure.   Because he “welcomed God in the persons of the travellers… this was why he was granted God’s mercy.”

Richarius converted to Christianity under their influence.   After his conversion, he fasted on barley bread mixed with ashes and drank only water.   He was ordained a Priest and travelled to England, preaching the Gospel and curing the sick.   Travelling by donkey rather than horse, he read the psalter as he rode.

In 638, after some years in England, Richarius returned home and founded a Monastery in his hometown in Ponthieu that was named Centule (or Centula, alteration of Latin Centum Turres – hundred towers).   This monastery practised according to the Rule of Saint Columbanus.

A city developed around this Monastery, also named Centule.   In the Middle Ages it was renamed to Saint-Riquier.  Nowadays it has some 1200 inhabitants, who still refer to themselves as Centulois.   The Frankish king Dagobert I once came to visit the Monastery, and Richarius offered the king advice.   He was frank and clear in his speech to the king, speaking without fear or flattery and the king thereafter, became a benefactor of the Monastery.   Others also gave generously to Richarius’s Monastery and he was able to use the money to help lepers and the poor and to ransom prisoners held by England.450px-Saint-Riquier,_Richarius Abbaye_de_Saint-Riquier_32

Richarius eventually founded a second Monastery called Forest-Montier.   He made a shelter in the forest of Crécy, fifteen miles from his Monastery.   He lived there as a hermit with his disciple Sigobart.   On 26 April 645, he bid farewell to Sigobart and died.

His relics were first put in a coffin made of an oak trunk and then translated to the Abbey of Centula.   One hundred and fifty years later, Charlemagne built a golden shrine to enclose the relics and had the Saint-Riquier Gospels made for the shrine.   In 950 Count Arnulf I transferred the bones to Montreuil, then to the Abbey of Saint Bertin in today’s St-Omer.    In 980, Hugo Capet returned them to St-Riquier.   Above the tomb of Richarius, an Abbey was built, which was later named after him, as was the city.

515px-Saint-Riquier_23-09-2008_10-47-36 st richarius relics
Relics of Saint Richarius, kept in the Abbey Church of St Riquier

Aside from Saint-Riquier, the city of Saint-Riquier-en-Rivière in Normandy bears his name and there is one church in England St Ricarius Church, Aberford, a town the saint is supposed to have visited in 630.Sorrus_vitrail_fontaine_St_Riquier Richarius450px-Saint-Riquier,richarius_Abbaye_de_Saint-Riquier_29

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

The Third Sunday of Easter, Year A +2020 and Memorials of the Saints – 26 April

The Third Sunday of Easter, Year A +2020

Our Lady of Good Counsel (Memorial)
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/thought-for-the-day-26-april/

Bl Alda of Siena
St Antoninus of Rome
St Basileus of Amasea
St Clarence of Venice
St Claudius of Rome
St Pope Cletus (c 25-c 89) 3rd Bishop of Rome and Martyr
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-st-pope-cletus/
St Cyrinus of Rome
St Exuerantia of Troyes
Bl Gregory of Besians
Bl Juli Junyer Padern
St Lucidius of Verona
St Pope Marcellinus (Died 304) Martyr

St Paschasius Radbertus (785–865)
His life:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-saint-paschasius-radbertus-785-865/
St Pelligrino of Foggia
St Peter of Braga
St Primitive of Gabi
St Rafael Arnáiz Barón (1911-1938)
About this memorable Saint:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/26/saint-of-the-day-26-april-st-rafael-arnaiz-baron-o-c-s-o-1911-1938/

St Richarius of Celles (c 560-645)
Bl Stanislaw Kubista
St Trudpert of Munstertal
St William of Foggia
Bl Wladyslaw Goral