Posted in BREVIARY Prayers, HYMNS, Our MORNING Offering, The TRANSFIGURATION

Our Morning Offering – 6 August – Transfigured Christ, Believed and Loved,

Our Morning Offering – 6 August – “Month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary”- Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord

Transfigured Christ, Believed and Loved,
(More Ancient than the Primal World)
Benedictine Nuns of Stanbrook Abbey
Breviary Lauds Hymn
Feast of the Transfiguration

More ancient than the primal world
And older than the morning star,
Before the first things took their shape,
Creator of them all, You are.

Your image is the Lord of life,
Your Son from all eternity,
All that must perish, He restores,
In Him, all reconciled will be.

Transfigured Christ, believed and loved,
In You our only hope has been.
Grant us, in Your unfathomed love,
Those things no eye has ever seen.

O Father, Son and Spirit blest,
With hearts transfigured by Your grace,
May we Your matchless splendour praise
And see the glory of Your Face.

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY, The TRANSFIGURATION

Feast of the Transfiguration of Our Lord, Nossa Senhora das Graças / Our Lady of Graces, Pesqueira, Pernambuco, Northeast, Brazil (1936) and Memorials of the Saints – 6 August

Transfiguration of Our Lord (Feast)
https://anastpaul.com/2018/08/06/feast-of-the-transfiguration-of-the-lord-6-august-todays-gospel-mark-92-10/
AND:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/august-6-the-feast-of-the-transfiguration-of-the-lord/

Nossa Senhora das Graças / Our Lady of Graces, Pesqueira, Pernambuco, Northeast, Brazil (1936) – 6 August :

On 6 August 1936, Maria da Luz Teixeira, 13, and Maria da Conceição, 16 (a poor girl living with the Teixeira family), were gathering castor beans on Guarda mountain in the Cimbres district, 15 miles from Pesqueira. There was a flash of light and then Maria da Conceição said, “Look, there’s an image that looks like Our Lady.” Maria da Luz saw it too, up on a rock. They ran home and told Maria da Luz’s parents. At her mother’s insistence, Artur Teixeira climbed the hill with the girls, who reached the spot long before he struggled up through the brush. He saw nothing unusual but, at his suggestion, the girls together asked the image, “Who are you?” “I am Grace.” They asked what she wanted. “I’ve come to warn of three punishments sent by God. Tell the people to pray much and do penance.”

After this the girls returned to the site daily, where they prayed with a growing crowd of pilgrims. On 9 August, the crowd demanded a sign; reluctantly, the girls asked for one. The next day, they found water flowing from the rock and two sets of footprints embedded in stone, one an adult’s and one a child’s. The apparition confirmed they belonged to her and her son. The Bishop conducted an investigation. Maria da Luz described Our Lady of Grace as “similar to Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Pesqueira Cathedral but her mantle is blue and her dress cream, with a belt. She has a little child in her left arm and both have very beautiful crowns on their heads.”

Eventually the Virgin told her that the people’s response had been sufficient to avert the three chastisements, sometimes identified as armed bandits (particularly the notorious Lampião, killed by police in 1938) and the coming of World War II or a Communist regime to Brazil. Maria da Conceição died young. In 1940, Maria da Luz joined the Religious of Christian Instruction, taking the name Sister Adélia. In her absence, pilgrims continued to visit the Shrine at the apparition site, where 296 carved stone steps lead to a Statue of Our Lady of Grace (as depicted on the Miraculous Medal, without the Child, not as the girls saw her) and to report miracles there.
In 1966, the Vatican approved the apparitions. Sister Adélia has since participated in some events at the Shrine, including the anniversary pilgrimages of 1985 and 1986 and reported some new messages from Our Lady. As of 2010 she was still living, aged 87. Because the original site is located in the Xukuru Indian reservation, an area of constant conflict, the City and Diocese of Pesqueira have built a new Shrine to Our Lady of Grace, with a grotto and Chapel, on a Calvary Shrine hill closer to town.

Bl Gezelin of Schlebusch
St Gislain of Luxemburg
St Glisente of Brescia
Bl Goderanno
Bl Guillermo Sanz
St Hardulf of Breedon

St Pope Hormisdas (c 450-523) Bishop of Rome from 514 until his death in 523. A talented diplomat, arbitrator and negotiator.
His Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/08/06/saint-of-the-day-6-august-saint-pope-hormisdas-c-450-523/

St James the Syrian

St Justus and St Pastor of Alcala – Holy Martyred Children (Died 304) Saints Justus and Pastor of Alcala were two brothers, who in their tender age overcame, with an heroic courage, the rage and power of Dacian, armed with all the instruments of cruelty.
The Martyred Children:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/08/06/saints-of-the-day-6-august-saints-justus-and-pastor-the-holy-martyred-children-of-alcala-de-henares-in-spain-died-304/

Bl Octavian of Savona
St Pope Sixtus II (Died 258) Pope and Martyr

St Stephen of Cardeña
Bl Tadeusz Dulny
Bl William of Altavilla

Martyrs of Cardeña: Two hundred Benedictine monks at the Saint Peter of Cardegna monastery, Burgos, Spain who were martyred in the 8th century by invading Saracens. They were buried by local Christians in a nearby churchyard in Burgos, Spain and Beatified in 1603 by Pope Clement VIII (cultus confirmed).

Martyred in the Spanish Civil War: 10 Beati
• Blessed Alejandro Casare Menéndez
• Blessed Andrés Soto Carrera
• Blessed José González Ramos Campos
• Blessed José María Recalde Magúregui
• Blessed Juan Silverio Pérez Ruano
• Blessed Saturnino Ortega Montealegre

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, LENT, MORNING Prayers, POETRY, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on CONVERSION, QUOTES on FAITH, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on OBEDIENCE, QUOTES on PERSECUTION, QUOTES on REPENTANCE, QUOTES on SANCTITY, QUOTES on SUFFERING, The HOLY CROSS, The TRANSFIGURATION, The WORD

25 February 2018 – Lenten Reflection – The Second Sunday in Lent, Year B THE GLORY OF THE CRUCIFIED CHRIS

25 February 2018 – Lenten Reflection – The Second Sunday in Lent, Year B
THE GLORY OF THE CRUCIFIED CHRIST

Genesis 22:1-2, 9-13, 15-18, Psalms 116:10, 15-19, Romans 8:31-34, Mark 9:2-10

Mark 9:2-3 – And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain apart by themselves;  and he was transfigured before them and his garments became glistening, intensely white, as no fuller on earth could bleach them.second sunday lenten reflection - mark 9 3

On the second Sunday in Lent we always read the Gospel of the Transfiguration of our Lord.   We do so in order that our focus may be directed towards the glory of Easter and our Lord’s victory over sin and death by His glorious Resurrection.   Our Lenten penance is not an end in itself but a means to an end;  that cleansed of our faults and sanctified in both body and mind we might more fully appreciate and participate in God’s own glory. The word that Sacred Scripture most commonly uses to describe the nature of God is glory.   We associate glory with power, majesty, radiance, awe and wonder.   Yet all the Gospels, especially the Gospel of John, speak of God’s humiliation as His exaltation, His glory.   By faith, we are seized by the beauty and glory of the Crucified Christ.   In this mystery of the Transfiguration a twofold glory is revealed:  the glory which our Lord possesses as the eternal Son of the Father and the glory that is manifested in His sacred Passion;  the glory that is manifested from the unsurpassable torture of Holy Week.   God Himself is “whipped to blood, crowned with thorns, mocked, spat upon, ridiculed, nailed, pierced…   In this consummate ugliness, this unspeakable outrage, shines a picture of divine beauty, of divine glory.   The Gospel of the Transfiguration presents us with a vision of the glory of God on its way to the Passion”… (Cardinal Hans Urs Von Balthasar 1905-1988).

The glory revealed to Peter, James and John is a glimpse of the glory of the Resurrection, a glory that we too are destined to share;  however, it is the Passion that “leads to the glory of the Resurrection” (Preface for the Second Sunday in Lent, The Roman Missal). Consequently, we are ever mindful that “we preach Christ crucified … Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God” (1 Cor 1:23-24).   Our Lord Jesus Christ “is the radiant light of God’s glory and the perfect copy of His nature” (Heb 1:3).   Those who gaze on the Crucified Christ in faith are able to perceive that His hour of highest spiritual beauty—and glory—is a moment of utmost bodily degradation.   In the humiliation of the Cross the Saviour brings near and makes visible the divine glory for we see in Him the ineffable love of God for sinners.   This is a love, a beauty and a glory that can only be perceived by a prayerful, contemplative gaze  . It is only by means of prayer and penance that we can come to some understanding of why our Lord brought about our salvation in such weakness, diminishment and pain.

No human life is exempt from diminishment and pain.   If we are given the grace to grow older, the weight of years alone brings about diminishment.   Why must it be so?   Perhaps our own diminishment is meant to conform us to the self-emptying of the Son of God on the Cross.   This may very well be the grace of old age.   That our redemption has taken place through suffering of the flesh and spilling of blood may mean that it could take place in no other way.   It is for this reason that above all things we must seek simply to be with Jesus and to learn from Him what He alone can teach us in the silence of prayer.   On the Cross we have the ultimate and only adequate answer to the problem of evil, the only solution to the mystery of sin.   The world’s redemption could only be brought about “in the mystery of a love that by suffering understands all the insults inflicted upon it” (Hans Urs Von Balthasar).   Our profession of faith, if taken seriously, is journey into the depth of this Mystery.

What do we discover as we come to know more of this mystery?   Quite simply, that the essence of Christian discipleship is to be with Jesus and to learn from Him who accompanies us on life’s journey and who is never distant from us by means of His grace. We must endeavour to abandon ourselves to the will of the Father as He did and in this is our peace:  not only our peace but also our way to holiness, to glory.   Christians are not immune from suffering.   Indeed, our long history teaches us that often we suffer more precisely because of our Christian faith but as St Paul asks, “who will separate us from the love of Christ? Will hardship, or distress or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril or sword? No, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him who loved us” (Rom 8:35-37).   These words are more than ever relevant as we witness the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere.   Our faith enables us not only to overcome the trials we suffer but also to be sanctified by them and through them.   We understand these as our means to holiness; a state to which we are called.

“The entire virtue of what we call holiness lies in faithfulness to what God ordains” (Jean Pierre de Caussade, The Joy of Full Surrender, [Paraclete Press], p.17).   Surely, this is what we learn when we contemplate the life and Passion of our Lord.   Fidelity to duty, discipline of life, moral rectitude;  these are the ways in which we are faithful to what God ordains.   They are no less the means by which our lives are so transformed and so transfigured that we come to “live for the praise of his glory” (Eph 1:12).   Anything that contradicts these principles is a path to misery and destruction and a betrayal of the Cross of Christ.

After His glorious resurrection our Lord asked the disciples on the road to Emmaus, “Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer these things and enter into his glory?” (Lk 24:26).   And so it is with us; we must be willing to recognise what is best for us in what God ordains for us.   Like the disciples on the mountain, the revelation of God’s will for us, whether it be in the suffering that He asks of us or permits us to endure, or simply in the challenges that we face in living; these may confound us and might even cause us to be very much afraid.   Like Peter, James and John, however, we too are privileged to perceive the glory of the Lord;  a glory however that is veiled in the poverty, humility, and vulnerability of the Crucifix that hangs before us and in the Sacrament of the Cross, the Eucharist.   These reveal a love so powerful that neither hate nor death could conquer it.   Because we receive and worship this Sacrament, this same love is at work in the hearts of all who believe.   By its power great deeds of love are done and great evils are faced and overcome.   The Passion of our Lord gives a human face to the love of God for a fallen humanity.   Our own sufferings, mysterious as they may be in both their origin and purpose, place us in the very heart of the Paschal Mystery.   Suffering is not meaningless nor is it without purpose and neither is our life.   “Nothing short of suffering, except in rare cases, makes us what we should be;  gentle instead of harsh, meek instead of violent, conceding instead of arrogant, lowly instead of proud, pure-hearted instead of sensual”   (Bl. John Henry Newman (1801-1890), “The Sweet Yoke of Christ,” 1839).

Transfiguration
By Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890)

They were talking to Him about resurrection,
about law, about the suffering ahead.
They were talking as if to remind Him who He was and
who they were. He was not

Like his three friends watching a little way off,
not like the crowd At the foot of the hill.
A grey-green thunderhead massed
from the sea

And God spoke from it and said He was His.
They were talking about how the body, broken or
burned,
could live again, remade.

Only the fiery text of the thunderhead could explain it.
And they were talking
About pain and the need for judgement
and how He would make Himself

A law of pain, both its spirit and its letter in His own
flesh,
and then break it,
That is, transcend it.
His clothes flared like magnesiumtransfiguration by bl john henry newman - 2nd sun lent 25 feb 2018

My Lord, I Offer You Myself
Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890)

My Lord,
I offer You myself in turn,
as a sacrifice of thanksgiving.
You have died for me,
And I in turn make myself over to You.
I am not my own.
You have bought me:
I will, by my own act and deed,
complete the purchase.
My wish is to be separated
from everything of this world;
To cleanse myself simply from sin;
To put away from me even what is innocent,
If used for its own sake
and not for Yours.
I put away reputation and honour
and influence and power,
For my praise and strength,
shall be in You.
Enable me to carry out what I profess
Amenmy lord i offer you myself - bl john henry newman - lenten prayer - 25 feb 2018 - 2nd sun lent