Posted in QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on HOLY SCRIPTURE, QUOTES on MISSION, QUOTES on TIME, St JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN!, The WORD

Quote/s of the Day – 15 October – Let us begin!

Quote/s of the Day – 15 October – Monday of the Twenty Eighth week in Ordinary Time, Year C, Gospel: Luke 11:29–32

“Our Saviour’s words
are not of a nature
to be heard once
and no more
but that to understand them,
we must feed upon them
and live in them,
as if by, little and little,
growing into their meaning.”

Saint John Henry Newman (1801-1890)our saviour's words - st john henry newman 14 oct 2019.jpg

“Yesterday is gone.
Tomorrow has not yet come.
We have only today.
Let us begin.”

Saint Mother Teresa (1910-1997)yesterday is gone tomorrow has not yet come - st mother tresa 14 oct 2019.jpg

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, One Minute Reflection, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on DESPAIR, QUOTES on HOPE, QUOTES on REPENTANCE, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 15 October – ‘Let us beware of losing all hope…’

One Minute Reflection – 15 October – Monday of the Twenty Eighth week in Ordinary Time, Year C, Gospel: Luke 11:29–32 and the Memorial of Blessed Roman Lysko (1914–1949) Priest and Martyr

“For they repented at the preaching of Jonah and behold, something greater than Jonah is here.” … Luke 11:32

REFLECTION – “Let us beware of losing all hope but let us also avoid giving in too easily to carelessness…   Despair hinders those who have fallen, from getting up again and carelessness causes those who are standing, to fall…   If presumption casts us down from the heights of heaven, despair casts us into the infinite depths of evil, whereas a little hope is enough to hold us back…
This is how Nineveh was saved.   However, the divine judgement pronounced against the Ninevites was of a nature to throw them into confusion since it did not say:  “If you repent you will be saved” but simply:  “Three more days and Nineveh will be destroyed” (Jon 3:4).   Nevertheless, neither the Lord’s threat, nor the prophet’s preaching, nor even the severity of the judgement… caused their confidence to fail.   God wants us to draw a lesson, from this unconditional judgement that taught by this example, that we may resist despair as much as passivity…  Besides, divine good will does not only reveal itself in the forgiveness granted to the repentant Ninevites.. the respite granted them, attests likewise, to His unutterable goodness.   Do you imagine that three days would have been enough to wipe out so much wickedness?   God’s good will is breaking out from behind these words and, besides, isn’t it the principal worker of the whole city’s salvation?
Let this example keep us from despairing.   For the devil thinks of this form of weakness as his most successful weapon and, even when we sin, we could not give him greater pleasure than when we lose hope.” … St John Chrysostom (345-407) Father & Doctorluke 11 32 for they repented at the preaching of jonah - despair hope - st john chrysostom 14 oct 2019

PRAYER – Eternal, almighty God and Father, teach us true sorrow and repentance.  Grant us the grace of trust and hope in Your unfailing love, that we may resist despair as we face the sin of the world and the wiles of the evil one.   As we walk always in the Light of Christ, Your Son, following His way, we may never fall into temptation.   May the intercession of Your saints and martyrs, be always an assistance to us all.   Mary, our Mother of merciful love and Blessed Roman Lysko, pray for us.   Through Christ our Lord and the Holy Spirit, God for always and forever, amen.merciful mother mary pray for us 14 oct 2019

Posted in Our MORNING Offering, PRAYERS of the SAINTS, St JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN!

Our Morning Offering – 14 October – The Grace of Thy Love

Our Morning Offering – 14 October – Monday of the Twenty Eighth week in Ordinary Time, Year C

The Grace of Thy Love
By Saint John Henry Newman (1801-1890)

O My God,
strengthen me with Thy strength,
console me with Thy everlasting peace,
soothe me with the beauty of Thy countenance,
enlighten me with Thy uncreated holiness.
Bathe me in Thyself
and give me to drink,
as far as mortal man may ask,
of the rivers of grace
which flow from the Father and the Son,
the grace of Thy consubstantial,
co-eternal Love.
Amenthe grace of they love - st john henry newman - 14 oct 2019

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 14 October – Blessed Roman Lysko (1914–1949) Priest and Martyr

Saint of the Day – 14 October – Blessed Roman Lysko (1914–1949) aged 35 Priest and Martyr (Ukrainian: Роман Лиск) was a Ukrainian Greek Catholic. Born on 14 August 1914 at Horodok, Lviv District, Ukraine and died by being tortured and starved to death on 14 October 1949 in prison at Lviv, Ukraine.   He died for the Faith under the Communist regime.bl roman larger

Blessed Roman was born on 14 August 1914 in Horodok, Lviv Oblast.   He studied theology and graduated from the Lviv Theological Academy.   On 28 August 1941 he was ordained a priest by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky.   He was Pastor of the Archeparchy of Lviv for Ukrainians.

He was assigned as the administrator for the parish in the village of Kotliw, Oliyiv county.   In 1944 he was appointed to a parish in the village of Belzets, Zolochiv county. He was also a member of the underground Ukrainian youth organisation “Plast” in his 30’s and leader of the Plast group “Fox” (Lys).

Blessed Roman was active in working with youth, together with his wife (ordaining married priests is a common practice in the Eastern Churches).Blessed_Roman_Lysko_(1914_–_1949)

On 9 September 1949, he was arrested by the secret Police, the NKVD (KGB).   He was put into prison in Lviv.   The people of Liviv reported to one another that after being tortured, the young Fr Roman sang Psalms at the top of his voice.   It was then reported that they had immured him alive in the prison walls.   His death is officially dated on 14 October 1949.

A plaque on that building on Lonsky Avenue reads that here, within the walls of this building, entombed alive, lies Father Roman Lysko, who gave up his life for his faith.

He was beatified by St Pope John Paul II on 27 June 2001.bl roman lysko icon

Note:   Immurement (from Latin im- “in” and murus “wall”, literally “walling in”) is a form of imprisonment, usually until death, in which a person is placed within an enclosed space with no exits.   This includes instances where people have been enclosed in extremely tight confinement, such as within a coffin.   When used as a means of execution, the prisoner is simply left to die from starvation or dehydration.   This form of execution is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.   In Blessed Roman’s case, he was actually cemented alive into the prison walls.

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 14 October

St Pope Callistus I (c 218 – c 223) Martyr (Optional Memorial)
Biography here:   https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/saint-of-the-day-st-pope-callistus-i-14-october/

Bl Ana María Aranda Riera
St Angadrisma of Beauvais
St Bernard of Arce
St Celeste of Metz
St Dominic Loricatus
St Donatian of Rheims (Died 390)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2018/10/14/saint-of-the-day-14-october-st-donatian-of-rheims-died-390/
St Fortunatus of Todi
St Franciszek Roslaniec
St Gaudentius of Rimini
St Gundisalvus of Lagos
Bl Jacques Laigneau de Langellerie
St Lupulo of Capua
St Lupus of Caesarea
St Manacca
St Manehildis
St Modesto of Capua
Bl Richard Creagh
Bl Roman Lysko (1914–1949) Martyr
St Rusticus of Trier
St Saturninus of Caesarea
St Stanislaw Mysakowski
St Venanzio of Luni

Martyrs of Caesarea – (4 saints): Three brothers and a sister martyred together in the persecutions of Diocletian – Carponius, Evaristus, Fortunata and Priscian. In 303 in Caesarea, Cappadocia (in modern Turkey) – their relics enshrined in Naples, Italy.

Martyred in the Spanish Civil War:
• Blessed Ana María Aranda Riera
• Blessed Jacques Laigneau de Langellerie

Posted in ON the SAINTS, Papa FRANCIS, PAPAL HOMILIES, St JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN!, The WORD

Pope Francis celebrates Canonisation Mass of 5 New Saints and says “Let us ask to be like that, “kindly lights”

Pope Francis celebrates Canonisation Mass of 5 New Saints and says “Let us ask to be like that, “kindly lights.”

HOLY MASS AND CANONISATION OF THE BLESSEDS:
JOHN HENRY NEWMAN, GIUSEPPINA VANNINI,
MARIAM THRESIA CHIRAMEL MANKIDIYAN, DULCE LOPES PONTES, MARGUERITE BAYS
HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
St Peter’s Square
XXVIII Sunday of Ordinary Time
13 October 2019CANONISAITION MASS JOHN HENRY NEWMAN 13 oct 2019

“Your faith has saved you” (Lk 17:19).   This is the climax of today’s Gospel, which reflects the journey of faith.   There are three steps in this journey of faith.   We see them in the actions of the lepers whom Jesus heals.   They cry out, they walk and they give thanks.

First, they cry out.   The lepers were in a dreadful situation, not only because of a disease that, widespread even today, needs to be battled with unremitting effort but also because of their exclusion from society.   At the time of Jesus, lepers were considered unclean and, as such, had to be isolated and kept apart (cf. Lev 13:46).   We see that when they approach Jesus, they “kept their distance” (Lk 17:12).  Even though their condition kept them apart, the Gospel tells us that they “called out” (v. 13) and pleaded with Jesus.  They did not let themselves be paralysed because they were shunned by society, they cried out to God, who excludes no-one.   We see how distances are shortened, how loneliness is overcome – by not closing in on ourselves and our own problems, by not thinking about how others judge us but rather by crying out to the Lord, for the Lord hears the cry of those who find themselves alone.

Like those lepers, we too need healing, each one of us.   We need to be healed of our lack of confidence in ourselves, in life, in the future we need to be healed of our fears and the vices that enslave us, of our introversion, our addictions and our attachment to games, money, television, mobile phones, to what other people think.   The Lord sets our hearts free and heals them if only we ask Him, only if we say to Him : “Lord, I believe you can heal me.   Dear Jesus, heal me from being caught up in myself.   Free me from evil and fear”.   The lepers are the first people, in this Gospel, who called to the name of Jesus. Later, a blind man and a crucified thief would do so, all of them needy people calling on the name of Jesus, which means:  “God saves”.   They call God by name, directly and spontaneously.   To call someone by name is a sign of confidence and it pleases the Lord. That is how faith grows, through confident, trusting prayer.   Prayer in which we bring to Jesus, who we really are, with open hearts, without attempting to mask our sufferings. Each day, let us invoke with confidence the name of Jesus, “God saves”.   Let us repeat it: that is prayer, to say “Jesus“ is to pray.   And prayer is essential!   Indeed, prayer is the door of faith, prayer is medicine for the heart.

The second word, is to walk.   It is the second stage.   In today’s brief Gospel, there are several verbs of motion.   It is quite striking is that the lepers are not healed as they stand before Jesus, it is only afterwards, as they were walking.   The Gospel tells us that:  “As they went, they were made clean” (v. 14).   They were healed by going up to Jerusalem, that is, while walking uphill.   On the journey of life, purification takes place along the way, a way that is often uphill since it leads to the heights.   Faith calls for journey, a “going out” from ourselves, and it can work wonders if we abandon our comforting certainties, if we leave our safe harbours and our cosy nests.   Faith increases by giving, and grows by taking risks.  Faith advances when we make our way equipped with trust in God.   Faith advances with humble and practical steps, like the steps of the lepers or those of Naaman who went down to bathe in the river Jordan (cf. 2 Kings 5:14-17).   The same is true for us.   We advance in faith by showing humble and practical love, exercising patience each day and praying constantly to Jesus as we keep pressing forward on our way.

There is a further interesting aspect to the journey of the lepers: they move together.   The Gospel tells us that, “as they went, they were made clean” (v. 14).   The verbs are in the plural.   Faith means also walking together, never alone.   Once healed, however, nine of them go off on their own way and only one turns back to offer thanks.   Jesus then expresses His astonishment:  “The others, where are they?” (v. 17).   It is as if He asks the only one who returned, to account for the other nine.   It is the task of us, who celebrate the Eucharist as an act of thanksgiving, to take care of those who have stopped walking, those who have lost their way.   We are called to be guardians of our distant brothers and sisters, all of us!   We are to intercede for them, we are responsible for them, to account for them, to keep them close to heart.   Do you want to grow in faith?   You, who are here today, do you want to grow in faith?   Then take care of a distant brother, a faraway sister.

To cry out.   To walk.   And to give thanks.   This is the final step.   Only to the one who thanked Him did Jesus say:  “Your faith has saved you” (v. 19).   It made you both safe and sound.   We see from this, that the ultimate goal is not health or wellness but the encounter with Jesus.   Salvation is not drinking a glass of water to keep fit, it is going to the source, which is Jesus.   He alone frees us from evil and heals our hearts.   Only an encounter with Him can save, can make life full and beautiful.   Whenever we meet Jesus, the word “thanks” comes immediately to our lips, because we have discovered the most important thing in life, which is not to receive a grace or resolve a problem but to embrace the Lord of life.   And this is the most important thing in life – to embrace the Lord of life.

It is impressive to see how the man who was healed, a Samaritan, expresses his joy with his entire being – he praises God in a loud voice, he prostrates himself and he gives thanks (cf. vv. 15-16).   The culmination of the journey of faith is to live a life of continual thanksgiving.   Let us ask ourselves – do we, as people of faith, live each day as a burden, or as an act of praise?   Are we closed in on ourselves, waiting to ask another blessing, or do we find our joy in giving thanks?   When we express our gratitude, the Father’s heart is moved and He pours out the Holy Spirit upon us.   To give thanks is not a question of good manners or etiquette, it is a question of faith.   A grateful heart is one that remains young.   To say “Thank you, Lord” when we wake up, throughout the day and before going to bed – that is the best way to keep our hearts young, because hearts can grow old and be spoilt.   This also holds true for families and between spouses.   Remember to say thank you.   Those words are the simplest and most effective of all.

To cry out.   To walk.   To give thanks. Today we give thanks to the Lord for our new Saints.   They walked by faith and now we invoke their intercession.   Three of them were religious women, they show us that the consecrated life is a journey of love at the existential peripheries of the world.   Saint Marguerite Bays, on the other hand, was a seamstress, she speaks to us of the power of simple prayer, enduring patience and silent self-giving.   That is how the Lord made the splendour of Easter radiate in her life, in her humbleness.   Such is the holiness of daily life, which Saint John Henry Newman described in these words – “The Christian has a deep, silent, hidden peace, which the world sees not… The Christian is cheerful, easy, kind, gentle, courteous, candid, unassuming, has no pretence… with so little that is unusual or striking in his bearing, that he may easily be taken at first sight for an ordinary man” (Parochial and Plain Sermons, V, 5).
Let us ask to be like that, “kindly lights amid the encircling gloom.”   Jesus, “stay with me and then I shall begin to shine as Thou shinest, so to shine as to be a light to others”  (Meditations on Christian Doctrine, VII, 3).   Amen … Vatican.va

Saint John Henry Newman, Pray for Us!st john henry newman pray for us 13 oct 2019.jpg

 

Posted in PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, St JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN!, VATICAN Resources

Thought for the Day – 13 October – Praise to the Holiest in the Height! for our Beloved Saint John Henry

Thought for the Day – 13 October – Twenty Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C and today, John Henry Newman will be Canonised

Today, at 10.30 Roman time, John Henry Newman and 4 others will be Canonised by Pope Francis.   They are:

– English Cardinal John Henry Newman, Founder of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri in England

– Italian Sister Giuseppina Vannini (born Giuditta Adelaide Agata), Founder of the Daughters of Saint Camillus

– Indian Sister Mariam Thresia Chiramel Mankidiyan, Founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family

– Brazilian Sister Dulce Lopes Pontes (born Maria Rita) of the Congregation of the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God

– Marguerite Bays of Switzerland, Virgin of the Third Order of Saint Francis of Assisi.

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13 oct 2019 - today we call you st john henry newman praise to the holiest.jpg

Excerpt from Pope Benedict XVI’s Beatification Homily
Birmingham, Sunday, 19 September 2010

newman and benedict

Cardinal Newman’s motto, Cor ad cor loquitur, or “Heart speaks unto heart”, gives us an insight into his understanding of the Christian life as a call to holiness, experienced as the profound desire of the human heart to enter into intimate communion with the Heart of God.   He reminds us that faithfulness to prayer gradually transforms us into the divine likeness.   As he wrote in one of his many fine sermons, “a habit of prayer, the practice of turning to God and the unseen world in every season, in every place, in every emergency – prayer, I say, has what may be called a natural effect in spiritualising and elevating the soul.   A man is no longer what he was before, gradually … he has imbibed a new set of ideas and become imbued with fresh principles   (Parochial and Plain Sermons, iv, 230-231).   Today’s Gospel tells us that no-one can be the servant of two masters (cf. Lk 16:13) and Blessed John Henry’s teaching on prayer explains how the faithful Christian is definitively taken into the service of the one true Master, who alone has a claim to our unconditional devotion (cf. Mt 23:10).   Newman helps us to understand what this means for our daily lives – he tells us that our divine Master has assigned a specific task to each one of us, a “definite service”, committed uniquely to every single person:   “I have my mission”, he wrote, “I am a link in a chain, a bond of connection between persons.   He has not created me for naught.   I shall do good, I shall do his work; I shall be an angel of peace, a preacher of truth in my own place … if I do but keep his commandments and serve him in my calling” (Meditations and Devotions, 301-2).

The definite service to which Blessed John Henry was called involved applying his keen intellect and his prolific pen to many of the most pressing “subjects of the day”.   His insights into the relationship between faith and reason, into the vital place of revealed religion in civilised societ, and into the need for a broadly-based and wide-ranging approach to education were not only of profound importance for Victorian England but continue today to inspire and enlighten many all over the world.   I would like to pay particular tribute to his vision for education, which has done so much to shape the ethos that is the driving force behind Catholic schools and colleges today.   Firmly opposed to any reductive or utilitarian approach, he sought to achieve an educational environment in which intellectual training, moral discipline and religious commitment would come together.   The project to found a Catholic University in Ireland provided him with an opportunity to develop his ideas on the subject and the collection of discourses that he published as The Idea of a University, holds up an ideal from which all those engaged in academic formation can continue to learn. And indeed, what better goal could teachers of religion set themselves than Blessed John Henry’s famous appeal for an intelligent, well-instructed laity – “I want a laity, not arrogant, not rash in speech, not disputatious, but men who know their religion, who enter into it, who know just where they stand, who know what they hold and what they do not, who know their creed so well that they can give an account of it, who know so much of history that they can defend it”  (The Present Position of Catholics in England, ix, 390).   On this day when the author of those words is raised to the altars, I pray that, through his intercession and example, all who are engaged in the task of teaching and catechesis will be inspired to greater effort by the vision he so clearly sets before us.

While it is John Henry Newman’s intellectual legacy that has understandably received most attention in the vast literature devoted to his life and work, I prefer on this occasion to conclude with a brief reflection on his life as a priest, a pastor of souls.   The warmth and humanity underlying his appreciation of the pastoral ministry is beautifully expressed in another of his famous sermons:  “Had Angels been your priests, my brethren, they could not have condoled with you, sympathised with you, have had compassion on you, felt tenderly for you, and made allowances for you, as we can; they could not have been your patterns and guides, and have led you on from your old selves into a new life, as they can who come from the midst of you” (“Men, not Angels – the Priests of the Gospel”, Discourses to Mixed Congregations, 3).   He lived out that profoundly human vision of priestly ministry in his devoted care for the people of Birmingham during the years that he spent at the Oratory he founded, visiting the sick and the poor, comforting the bereaved, caring for those in prison.   No wonder that on his death so many thousands of people lined the local streets as his body was taken to its place of burial not half a mile from here.   One hundred and twenty years later, great crowds have assembled once again to rejoice in the Church’s solemn recognition of the outstanding holiness of this much-loved father of souls.   What better way to express the joy of this moment than by turning to our heavenly Father in heartfelt thanksgiving, praying in the words that Blessed John Henry Newman placed on the lips of the choirs of angels in heaven:

Praise to the Holiest in the height
And in the depth be praise.
In all his words most wonderful,
Most sure in all his ways!
(The Dream of Gerontius)Praise to the Holiest in the Height - bl john henry newman - 9 oct 2018.jpgJOHN HENRY CANONISATION TAPESTRY NEWMAN 13 OCT 2019