Posted in FRANCISCAN OFM, MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

The First Sunday of Lent, Nossa Senhora da Nazaré / Our Lady of Nazareth, Pierre Noire, Portugal, (1150) and Memorials of the Saints – 6 March

The First Sunday of Lent +2022

Nossa Senhora da Nazaré / Our Lady of Nazareth, Pierre Noire, Portugal, (1150) – 6 March:
HERE:
https://anastpaul.com/2021/03/06/nossa-senhora-da-nazare-our-lady-of-nazareth-pierre-noire-portugal-1150-and-memorials-of-the-saints-6-march/

Sts Perpetua and Felicity (Died c203) Martyrs in Carthage (Roman province of Africa – modern day Tunisia) – Patrons of Mothers, Expectant Mothers, ranchers, butchers, Carthage, Catalonia.
Feast day moved in 1969 to 7 March.
Their Life and Death:

https://anastpaul.com/2017/03/07/saints-of-the-day-7-march-saints-perpetua-and-felicity/

St Aetius
St Bairfhion
St Baldred of Strathclyde
St Baldred the Hermit
St Balther of Lindisfarne
St Basil of Bologna
St Cadroë
St Chrodegang of Metz (c 714-776) Bishop

St Colette PCC (1381-1447) Abbess and Foundress of the Colettine Poor Clares, a reform branch of the Order of Saint Clare.
Biography:

https://anastpaul.com/2017/03/06/saint-of-the-day-6-march-st-colette/
AND:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/06/saint-of-the-day-6-march-st-colette-2/

St Cyriacus of Trier
St Cyril of Constantinople
St Evagrius of Constantinople
St Fridolin Vandreren of Säckingen
Bl Guillermo Giraldi
St Heliodorus the Martyr
Bl Jordan of Pisa
St Julian of Toledo
St Kyneburga of Castor
St Kyneswide of Castor
St Marcian of Tortona
Bl Ollegarius of Tarragona
St Patrick of Malaga
St Sananus

Blessed Sylvester of Assisi OFM (Died 1240) Priest, Friar. Sylvester was one of the first 4 followers of St Francis of Assisi and was the first Priest in the Franciscan Order.
About St Sylvester:

https://anastpaul.com/2021/03/06/saint-of-the-day-6-march-blessed-sylvester-of-assisi-ofm-died-1240-priest/

St Tibba of Castor
St Venustus of Milan

Martyrs of Amorium – 42 Saints – Also known as Martyrs of Syria and Martyrs of Samarra;
A group of 42 Christian senior officials in the Byzantine Empire who were captured by forces of the Abbasid Caliphate when the Muslim forces overran the City of Amorium, Phrygia in 838 and massacred or enslaved its population. The men were imprisoned in Samarra, the seat of the Caliphate, for seven years. Initially thought to be held for ransom due to their high position in the empire, all attempts to buy their freedom were declined. The Caliph repeatedly ordered them to convert to Islam and sent Islamic scholars to the prison to convince them; they refused until the Muslims finally gave up and killed them. Martyrs. We know the names and a little about seven of them:
• Aetios
• Bassoes
• Constantine
• Constantine Baboutzikos
• Kallistos
• Theodore Krateros
• Theophilos
but details about the rest have disappeared over time. However, a lack of information did not stop several legendary and increasingly over-blown “Acts” to be written for years afterward. One of the first biographers, a monk name Euodios, presented the entire affair as a judgement by God on the empire for its official policy of Iconoclasm.
Deaths:
• beheaded on 6 March 845 in Samarra (in modern Iraq) on the banks of the Euphrates river by Ethiopian slaves
• the bodies were thrown into the river, but later recovered by local Christians and given proper burial.

Posted in MARIAN PRAYERS, MARIAN TITLES, MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

The Third Sunday of Lent +2021, Nossa Senhora da Estrela / Our Lady of the Star, Villa Vicosa, Portugal (1050) and Memorials of the Saints – 7 March

The Third Sunday of Lent +2021

Nossa Senhora da Estrela / Our Lady of the Star, Villa Vicosa, Portugal (1050) – 7 March:

In the year 1050 there were two Benedictine Monks who lived in the convent of Monte Cassino. They decided to go on pilgrimage, teaching and catechising all those they met along the way.
One night they found themselves wandering on the coast of Normandy, France, near a place called Grand Champ. Tired and sleepy, they decided to spend the night on the beach under the stars. Father Rogerio slept on the cool sand and the other Monk found himself a place to rest in a small boat nearby.
As the night went on, the tide came up and the little boat was gently drawn out onto the sea. Without realising it, the Monk was going on an adventure in which he would not awaken until he was just off the coast of England.
In Salisbury, England, everyone was amazed to see the Monk in the little boat, convinced that it was a miracle that he had crossed the French Sea in a small boast and lived to see the shores of England. Soon, the Monk was made Bishop and his period in office was marvellous to the people because he was a humble man of prayer, who sacrificed everything for God.
The Monk who had stayed on the beach, Father Rogerio, knew nothing of what had happened to his friend. All he knew was that he and the boat had disappeared and, giving his concerns into the hands of God, he determined to continue on his journey alone.
One night not long afterward, Father Rogerio went to sleep and had a dream that would change his life forever. In his dream he saw a great star fall from the sky, burning all the bushes and trees and heard a voice that said: “Our Lady wants a Church built in this place.”
When he awoke, Father Rogerio looked about himself. He was not injured but this indeed was the place he had seen in his dream, for everything around him was burned. Father understood that Our Lady really did desire that he should build a Church there in her honour. He also felt in his heart, the desire to give Mary the title of “Our Lady of the Star” because of the star he had seen in his dream.
Due to the poverty of those who inhabited that region, Father Rogerio was only able to build a small Altar and a tiny Chapel which would be the seed of the great Abbey of Our Lady of the Star of Monteburgo. One day an immense Chapel would be built, sheltering not only the Church but a very large convent as well.
King William, who was the Duke of Normandy and he who had conquered England, learning of the Shrine of Our Lady of the Star, sent his private doctor to visit the little Chapel to find out for himself how it had all come about. Upon arriving there, the doctor discovered that he was the brother of the Monk Rogerio! He listened to his brother’s account of how he had been separated from his friend and then told about his dream. The doctor believed everything at once and to Father Rogerio’s surprise, the doctor knew the Monk who had crossed the channel in a small boat and informed his brother, that his lost friend had become the Bishop of Salisbury! The two brothers excitedly thanked Our Lady for providing this reunion.
The Bishop of Salisbury, our former friend of the Monk Rogerio, asked King William to help his brother in the faith, for they were both blessed by Our Lady on their pilgrimage.
William the Conqueror, with a glad heart, donated to Father Rogerio the entire region of Monteburg, along with the resources to build a great Church and an Abbey there that became a great seminary. The work was finished by the son of King William, King Henry. He, taking the throne, continued the work until its completion. The Abbey of Our Lady of the Star was, for many centuries, a centre of the Church for the whole region.
Dark centuries ensued and the Church and Abbey suffered a decline until in 1842, the Vicar General of Coutances took possession of what was by that time little more than an enclosure of ruins. He turned it over to the Brothers of Mercy, a new order meant to promote Catholic education. The Abbey Church was rebuilt but as time went on, the Brothers of Mercy also left and all is now used as part of an agricultural school. As for Our Lady of the Star, it is a story almost completely forgotten, even to Catholics.

Prayer to Our Lady of the Star

“O, Our Lady of the Star, to you our gaze turns and our childlike hearts.
You are the Morning Star, that announces the arrival of the day.
You are the Evening Star, that shines in our night.
You are the Star of the Sea, who sends us her son Jesus,
the eternal Light of the world.
Through the darkness and storms of life,
in the hour of doubt or of temptation,
in the revolt, be our clarity and our peace.
Be our hope and our purity,
be our sweetness and our strength,
O Lady of the Star.
May our gaze and our hearts forever rest on you.
O Lady of the Star, Pray for us.
Amen”

St Felicity of Carthage (Optional Memorial) Martyr (died c 203)
St Perpetua of Carthage (Optional Memorial) Martyr (died c 203)
About these 2 Mother Martyrs: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/saints-of-the-day-7-march-saints-perpetua-and-felicity/

St Ardo of Aniane
St Deifer of Bodfari
St Drausinus of Soissons
St Enodoch
St Esterwine of Wearmouth
St Eubulus of Caesarea
St Gaudiosus of Brescia
Bl Henry of Austria
Blessed Leonid Feodorov (1879-1935) Martyr
His Life and Death
:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/07/saint-of-the-day-7-march-blessed-leonid-feodorov-1879-1935-martyr/
St Paul of Prusa
St Paul the Simple
St Reinhard of Reinhausen
Bl William of Assisi

Martyrs of Carthage – 4 saints: A catechist and three students martyred together for teaching and learning the faith. We know little more than their names – Revocatus, Saturninus, Saturus and Secundulus. Mauled by wild beasts and beheaded 7 March 203 at Carthage, North Africa

Martyrs of Korea
St Siméon-François Berneux MEP (1814-1866) Bishop, Martyr
St Bernard-Louis Beaulieu
St Ioannes Baptista Nam Chong-Sam
St Pierre-Henri Dorie
St Simon-Marie-Just Ranfer de Bretenières

Martyrs of Laos
Bl Luc Sy
Bl Maisam Pho Inpèng
Martyrs of Tyburn
Bl German Gardiner
Bl John Ireland
Bl John Larke

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 7 March

St Felicity of Carthage (Optional Memorial) Martyr (died c 203)
St Perpetua of Carthage (Optional Memorial) Martyr (died c 203)
About these 2 Mother Martyrs: https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/saints-of-the-day-7-march-saints-perpetua-and-felicity/

St Ardo of Aniane
St Deifer of Bodfari
St Drausinus of Soissons
St Enodoch
St Esterwine of Wearmouth
St Eubulus of Caesarea
St Gaudiosus of Brescia
Bl Henry of Austria
Bl Leonid Feodorov (1879-1935) Martyr
Bl Maria Antonia de Paz y Figueroa
St Paul of Prusa
St Paul the Simple
Bl St Reinhard of Reinhausen
St Teresa Margaret Redi
Bl William of Assisi

Martyrs of Carthage – 4 saints: A catechist and three students martyred together for teaching and learning the faith. We know little more than their names – Revocatus, Saturninus, Saturus and Secundulus. Mauled by wild beasts and beheaded 7 March 203 at Carthage, North Africa

Martyrs of Korea
Siméon-François Berneux
Bernard-Louis Beaulieu
Ioannes Baptista Nam Chong-Sam
Pierre-Henri Dorie
Simon-Marie-Just Ranfer de Bretenières

Martyrs of Laos
Bl Luc Sy
Bl Maisam Pho Inpèng
Martyrs of Tyburn
Bl German Gardiner
Bl John Ireland
Bl John Larke

Posted in MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 7 March

Sts Perpetua and Felicity were ordinary wives and mothers, who were swept up in the madness of persecution, who loved their families and their children and certainly were not eager to die.   But heroism is found everywhere and their example has inspired Christians who have had to suffer for their faith, throughout the ages.   They could so easily have turned back – they were not even baptised yet!   And what of their teacher Saturus, who voluntarily joined the catechumens so that he might die for Christ with them and who (we presume it was he) baptised them whilst in prison – his name, in my opinion should be included with theirs.   THIS is bravery, this is our example, are we ready, willing and able to defend, to protect, to stand tall and if necessary to die?

Sts Perpetua, Felicity and Saturus, pray for us!

STS PERPETUA & FELICITY-PRAY FOR US 2

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 7 March

Quote/s of the Day – 7 March

“Father do you see this water jar,
or whatever it is, standing here?
Could one call it by any other name
than what it is? Well, in the same way
I cannot be called by any other name
than what I am—a Christian.”……..St Perpetua

FATHER, DO YOU SEE-ST PERPETUA

“Now it is I who suffer what I am suffering;
then, there will be another in me who will
suffer for me, because I will be suffering for Him.”…St Felicity

NOW IT IS I WHO SUFFER-ST FELICITY

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 7 March

One Minute Reflection – 7 March

Your Father knows what you need before you ask him…………Matthew 6:8

REFLECTION – “…….Remember that He permits every thing for your good and do not lose confidence:” ………. St Alphonso Maria de Liguori

PRAYER – Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. Stay with us Lord God and give us courage as you did Sts Perpetua and Felicity, whose prayers and intercession we request, amen.

YOUR FATHER KNOWS WHAT YOU NEED -MT 6-8REMEMBER THAT HE PERMITS......ST ALPHONSUS LIQUORISTS PERPETUA & FELICITY PRAY FOR US

Posted in MARTYRS, SAINT of the DAY

Saint/s of the Day – 7 March – Saints Perpetua and Felicity

Saint/s of the Day – 7 March – Saints Perpetua and Felicity – Martyrs (died c203) in Carthage (Roman province of Africa – modern day Tunisia) – Patrons of Mothers, Expectant Mothers, ranchers, butchers, Carthage, Catalonia.sts perpetua & felicity.jpg

Vibia Perpetua was a married noblewoman, said to have been 22 years old at the time of her death and mother of an infant she was nursing.   Felicity, a slave imprisoned with her and pregnant at the time, was martyred with her.   They were put to death along with others at Carthage in the Roman province of Africa.   According to the passion, a slave named Revocatus, his fellow slave Felicitas, the two free men Saturninus and Secundulus, and Perpetua, who were catechumens, that is, Christians being instructed in the faith but not yet baptised, were arrested and executed at the military games in celebration of the Emperor Septimus Severus’s birthday.   To this group was added a man named Saturus (the Catechist of St Perpetua) who voluntarily went before the magistrate and proclaimed himself a Christian.saints-perpetua-and-felicitas-altar-philip-ralley.jpg

St Perpetua kept a diary during her last days, while she awaited her execution.   Her diary, along with an eyewitness’s account of her death, is one of the oldest, most reliable histories of a martyr’s sufferings.   This account was passed down to encourage other Christians to witness to the world with their lives—to teach others that greater than life itself is knowing Jesus and being loyal to him.

Perpetua’s account records the events that took place in Carthage, Africa, in the year 202, when the Emperor Severus issued an anti-Christian law forbidding anyone to be baptised and become a Christian.   At that time twenty-two-year-old Perpetua was a catechumen, studying to become a Christian.   She was also the mother of an infant son.   Perpetua was arrested along with four other catechumens, including Felicity, her slave woman, who was about to give birth to a child.   All were tried and sentenced to be thrown to the wild beasts in the amphitheatre during a national holiday.   Their deaths would be scheduled along with sports events and various games.

During the days before their execution, their teacher Saturus voluntarily joined the catechumens so that he might die for Christ with them.   Perpetua’s father, a wealthy pagan, pleaded with her to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods so she could be free, but she refused. She said, “Father do you see this water jar, or whatever it is, standing here? Could one call it by any other name than what it is?   Well, in the same way I cannot be called by any other name than what I am—a Christian.”www-st-takla-org-sts-perpetua-n-felicity-015.jpg

While they were awaiting death, Perpetua and her companions were baptised.   Shortly before the scheduled execution, Felicity gave birth to a baby girl.   During childbirth, she had cried out in pain.  Someone hearing her asked her how she would ever endure the suffering of martyrdom.   She replied, “Now it is I who suffer what I am suffering, then, there will be another in me who will suffer for me, because I will be suffering for Him.”

On the day of their execution, the martyrs left their prison “joyfully as though they were on their way to heaven” and entered the arena, where they were killed before the cheering crowd.   Perpetua and Felicity were beheaded; the others were killed by wild beasts.    Today these women are mentioned in the first Eucharistic Prayer.www-st-takla-org-sts-perpetua-n-felicity-021.jpg