Posted in HOLY WEEK, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, The HOLY CROSS, The PASSION, The SEVEN LAST WORDS of CHRIST

Devotion of The Seven Last Words of Christ – The Fourth Word – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

Devotion of The Seven Last Words of Christ – The Fourth Word – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

The Seven Last Words of Christ

The Seven Last Words of Christ refer, not to individual words but to the final seven phrases that Our Lord uttered as He hung on the Cross.   These phrases were not recorded in a single Gospel but are taken from the combined accounts of the four Gospels.   Greatly revered, these last words of Jesus have been the subject of many books, sermons and musical settings.   For centuries The Seven Last Words have been built into various forms of devotion for the consideration and consolation of the Christian people.

“Take your crucifix in your hand
and ask yourselves whether this is the religion
of the soft, easy, worldly, luxurious days in which we live;
whether the crucifix does not teach you
a lesson of mortification, of self-denial, of crucifixion of the flesh.”

Cardinal Henry Edward Manning (1808-1892)take your crucifix in your hand - card henry edward manning - holy thursday - 29 march 2018

“As is well known, the initial cry of the Psalm 22, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”, is recorded by the Gospels of Matthew and Mark as the cry uttered by Jesus dying on the Cross (cf. Mt 27:46, Mk 15:34).   It expresses all the desolation of the Messiah, Son of God, who is facing the drama of death, a reality totally opposed to the Lord of life. Forsaken by almost all His followers, betrayed and denied by the disciples, surrounded by people who insult Him, Jesus is under the crushing weight of a mission that was to pass through humiliation and annihilation.   This is why He cried out to the Father and His suffering took up the sorrowful words of the Psalm.   But His is not a desperate cry, nor was that of the Psalmist who, in his supplication, takes a tormented path which nevertheless opens out at last into a perspective of praise, into trust in the divine victory.”…Pope Benedict XVI – General Audience 14 September 2011

as is well known - on my god my god why hast thou forsaken me - 29 march 2018 - holy thursday-pope benedict

The Fourth Word

“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Gospel – From noon onward, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon.   And about three o’clock Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” which means, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”…Matthew 27:45-46 (Psalm 22(21))

Reflection:  To ensure that He suffered every torment that normal man is prone to, Christ allowed Himself to experience despair. Up to this point, Jesus had suffered mainly physically.   These torments had left His body racked with pain and agony. But now it was time for the ultimate pain, the pain a soul feels when it is separated from God.

The soul is spiritual being in the image of God.   The human soul is like a plant is nourished by the bright sunlight of God.   The human soul needs this light to grow and flourish.   However, unlike a plant, the human soul does not die when it is separated from God because it cannot die. Instead the soul endures great and debilitating agony. It was this kind of agony that Our Lord willingly accepted on the Cross.

O sinful man, how can you claim that Our Lord does not understand the pain you are going through?   He has suffered every imaginable punishment.   He has felt the rejection of His own people.   He has endured the dreadful physical pains of a brutal scourging and ignominious death on a Cross.   He had endured the despair of a soul separated from God.   He understands pain, agony, loss and despair.   And He wishes to console you  . He stands with arms out stretched on the Cross, looking to comfort you in all your distress.

Lord Jesus Christ, You know better than anyone what suffering I am enduring. I beg you to give me the grace and strength to endure these hardships, that I may offer them as penance for my sins.   Help me to never refuse my cross, so that by taking it up daily I may be worthy of You one day. Amen.

Prayer of Abandonment to God’s Providence

My Lord and my God:
into your hands I abandon the past and the present and the future,
what is small and what is great,
what amounts to a little and what amounts to a lot,
things temporal and things eternal.
Amen. Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory Be.THE FOURTH WORD -MATTHEW 27 46 - THE SEVEN LAST WORDS OF CHRIST - THE DEVOTION - 29 MARCH 2018

Posted in CONFESSION/PENANCE, HOLY WEEK, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, QUOTES on CONVERSION, QUOTES on FORGIVENESS, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on REPENTANCE, The PASSION, The WORD

Thought for the Day – 29 March – Holy Thursday – The Mass of the Lord’s Supper 2018

Thought for the Day – 29 March – Holy Thursday – The Mass of the Lord’s Supper 2018vatican - statue at the gethsemane steps in rome

When the Lord tells Peter that without the washing of his feet he would never be able to have any part in Him, Peter immediately and impetuously asks to have his head and hands washed as well.   This is followed by the mysterious words of Jesus:  “Whoever has bathed has no need except to have his feet washed” (John 13:10).   Jesus alludes to a bath that the disciples, according to ritual prescriptions, had already taken; in order to participate in the meal, they now needed only to have their feet washed.   But naturally, a deeper meaning is hidden in this.   To what does it allude?   We do not know for sure.  In any case, we should keep in mind that the washing of the feet, according to the meaning of the entire chapter, does not indicate a single specific Sacrament but the “sacramentum Christi” in its entirety – His service of salvation, His descent even to the cross, His love to the end, which purifies us and makes us capable of God.

Here, with the distinction between the bath and the washing of feet, nevertheless, there also appears an allusion to life in the community of the disciples, to life in the community of the Church – an allusion that John may have intentionally transmitted to the community of his time.   It then seems clear that the bath that purifies us definitively and does not need to be repeated is Baptism – immersion in the death and resurrection of Christ, a fact that changes our lives profoundly, giving us something like a new a identity that endures, if we do not throw it away as Judas did.   But even in the endurance of this new identity, for convivial communion with Jesus we need the “washing of the feet.”   What does this mean?   It seems to me that the first letter of Saint John gives us the key for understanding this.   There we read: “If we say, ‘We are without sin,’ we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.   If we acknowledge our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from every wrongdoing” (1:8ff.).

We need the “washing of the feet,” the washing of our everyday sins and for this we need the confession of sins.   We do not know exactly how this was carried out in the Johannine community.   But the direction indicated by the words of Jesus to Peter is obvious:  in order to be capable of participating in the convivial community with Jesus Christ, we must be sincere.   One must recognise that even in our own identity as baptised persons, we sin.   We need confession as this has taken form in the Sacrament of reconciliation.   In it, the Lord continually rewashes our dirty feet and we are able to sit at table with Him.

But in this way, the word takes on yet another meaning, in which the Lord extends the “sacramentum” by making it the “exemplum,” a gift, a service for our brother:   “If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet” (John 13:14).   We must wash each other’s feet in the daily mutual service of love.   But we must also wash our feet, in the sense, of constantly forgiving one another.   The debt that the Lord has forgiven us is always infinitely greater than all of the debts that others could owe to us (cf. Mt. 18:21-35).   It is to this that Holy Thursday exhorts us:  not to allow rancour toward others to become, in its depths, a poisoning of the soul.   It exhorts us to constantly purify our memory, forgiving one another from the heart, washing each other’s feet, thus being able to join together in the banquet of God.

Holy Thursday is a day of gratitude and of joy for the great gift of love to the end that the Lord has given to us.   We want to pray to the Lord at this time, so that gratitude and joy may become in us the power of loving together with His love. Amen.

Pope Benedict XVI 20 March 2008 Holy Thursday – Mass of the Lord’s Supperwe must wash each other's feet in the daily mutual service of love- pope benedict - 29 march 2018 holy thurs

Posted in HOLY WEEK, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL HOMILIES, Pope BENEDICT XVI, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, QUOTES on FAITH, QUOTES on LOVE, The HOLY EUCHARIST, The PASSION, The WORD

Quote/s of the Day – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

Quote/s of the Day – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

“Christianity is above all a gift:  God gives himself to us – He does not give some thing but Himself.   And this takes place not only at the beginning, at the moment of our conversion.   He continually remains the One who gives.   He always offers us His gifts anew.   He always precedes us.   For this reason, the central action of being Christians is the Eucharist:  gratitude for having been gratified, the joy for the new life that He gives us.christianity is above all a gift - pope benedict - 27 march 2018 - holy thursday

In spite of all this, we do not remain passive recipients of the divine goodness.   God gratifies us as personal and living partners.   The love that is given is the dynamic of “loving together,” it is intended to be a new life within us, beginning from God. We thus understand the words that, at the end of the account of the washing of the feet, Jesus speaks to His disciples and to all of us:  “I give you a new commandment: love one another.   As I have loved you, so you also should love one another” (John 13:34).   The “new commandment” does not consist in a new and difficult norm, one that did not exist before.   The new commandment consists in a loving together with Him who loved us first.”

Pope Benedict XVI – 20 March 2008 Holy Thursday – Mass of the Lord’s Supperi give you a new commandment - pope benedict - holy thursday - 29 march 2008

Posted in CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, HOLY WEEK, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

One Minute Reflection – 29 March – Holy Thursday 2018

...And when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”   In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood.  Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.”..1 Corinthians 11:24-25

REFLECTION – “In the Mass the blood of Christ flows anew for sinners.”….St Augustine (354-430) Father & Doctor of the Churchin the mass the blood of christ - st augustine - 29 march 2018

PRAYER – Lord God, since for Your glory and our salvation, You willed Christ Your Son, to be the eternal High Priest, grant that the people He gained for You by His blood, may be strengthened by His cross and Resurrection, when they take part in His memorial service, through Christ in union with the Holy Spirit, one God forever, amen.The-Last-Supper-large

Posted in HOLY WEEK, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE

Our Morning Offering – 29 March 2018 – Holy Thursday

Our Morning Offering – 29 March 2018 – Holy Thursday

Jesu, be You my Life!
Msgr Robert Hugh Benson (1871-1914)

I cannot live alone another hour;
Jesu, be You my Life!
I have not power to strive;
be You my Power
In every strife!
I can do nothing
– hope, nor love, nor fear.
But only fail and fall.
Be You my soul and self,
O Jesu dear.
My God and all!
Amenjesu be you my life - msgr robert hugh benson - maundy thurs - 29 march 2018

Msgr Robert Hugh Benson (18 November 1871 – 19 October 1914) was an English Anglican priest who in 1903 was received into the Roman Catholic Church in which he was ordained priest in 1904.   He was a prolific writer of fiction and wrote the notable dystopian novel Lord of the World (1907).   His output encompassed historical, horror and science fiction, contemporary fiction, children’s stories, plays, apologetics, devotional works and articles.   He continued his writing career at the same time as he progressed through the hierarchy to become a Chamberlain (Chaplain) to Pope Pius X in 1911 and subsequently titled Monsignor.

220px-Monsignor_R._H._Benson_in_Oct._1912,_Aged_40

Posted in FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, HOLY WEEK

29 March 2018 – Maundy/Holy Thursday

29 March 2018 – Maundy/Holy Thursday – The First Day of the Paschal Triduum

The History of Holy Thursday
Holy Thursday is more than just the lead-in to the events of Good Friday;  it is, in fact, the oldest of the celebrations of Holy Week.   And with good reason—Holy Thursday is the day on which Catholics commemorate the institution of three pillars of the Catholic Faith:  the Sacrament of Holy Communion, the priesthood and the Mass.   During the Last Supper, Christ blessed the bread and wine that He shared with His disciples with the very words that Catholic and Orthodox priests use today to consecrate the Body and Blood of Christ during the Mass and the Divine Liturgy.   In telling His disciples to “Do this in remembrance of Me,” Jesus instituted the Mass and made them the first priests.

 

Maundy Thursday:   A New Commandment
Near the end of the Last Supper, after Judas had left to arrange for the betrayal of Christ, Jesus said to His disciples, “A new commandment I give unto you:  That you love one another, as I have loved you, that you also love one another.”  The Latin word for “commandment,” mandatum, became the source of another name for Holy Thursday: Maundy Thursday.I give you a new commandment - maundy thursday

The Chrism Mass
On Holy Thursday, the priests of each diocese gather with their bishop to consecrate holy oils, which are used throughout the year for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and the Anointing of the Sick.   This ancient practice, which can be traced back as far as the fifth century, is known as the Chrism Mass.

(Chrism is a mixture of oil and balsam used for the holy oils.)   The gathering of all the priests in the diocese to celebrate this Mass with their bishop stresses the role of the bishop as a successor to the apostles.

The Mass of the Lord’s Supper
Except in very rare circumstances, there is only one Mass other than the Chrism Mass celebrated on Holy Thursday in each church:  the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, which is celebrated after sundown.   It commemorates the institution of the Sacrament of Holy Communion and it ends with the removal of the Body of Christ from the tabernacle in the main body of the church.   The Eucharist is carried in procession to another place where it is kept overnight, to be distributed during the commemoration of the Lord’s Passion on Good Friday (when no Mass is held and therefore no hosts are consecrated). After the procession, the altar is stripped bare and all bells in the church are silent until the Gloria at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday.st jp the essence of our truthholy week trad

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 29 March

St Acacia of Antioch
St Archmimus of Africa
St Armogastes of Africa
St Barachasius
Bl Bertold of Mount Carmel
St Constantine of Monte Cassino
St Eustachio of Naples
St Firminus of Viviers
St Gladys
St Gwynllyw
Bl Hugh of Vaucelles
Bl John Hambley
St Jonas of Hubaham
St Lasar
St Ludolf of Ratzeburg
St Mark of Arethusa
St Masculas of Africa
St Pastor of Nicomedia
St Saturus of Africa
St Simplicius of Monte Cassino
St Victorinus of Nicomedia
St William Tempier