Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Easter Tuesday, Our Lady of the Conception, Flanders (1553) and Memorials of the Saints – 6 April

Easter Tuesday – The Third Day in the Easter Octave

Our Lady of the Conception, Flanders (1553) – 6 April:

The Abbot Orsini wrote: “Our Lady of the Conception, at the Capuchin Convent of Donay, in Flanders, where is seen a picture of the Immaculate Conception, which was miraculously preserved from fire, in the year 1553.”

Donay, now known as Douai in France, was once considered a thriving and populous region of Flanders during the Middle Ages, markedly famous, for its textile market. It is now a commune in northern France located on the Scarpe River 25 kilometers from Arras. The town of Douai is also known as Douay or Doway in the English language.
The County of Flanders became part of the domain of the Duke of Burgundy in the year 1384 and then in 1477, became a possession of the Habsburg’s. The Town was taken by the French army and became a permanent part of France in the year 1668. During successive sieges in 1710 and 1712, the City was almost completely razed to the ground by the British Army.
The University of Douai was founded in 1562. There was a Benedictine Priory founded at Douai in 1605. In the year 1609, a translation of the Old Te,stament was published there and combined with the recently published New Testament from Rheims, to create the famous Douay-Rheims Bible that is still considered to be the standard for the complete Catholic Bible.
It is certain that the French Revolution played a great deal of havoc in the region and the Town was heavily damaged during both World Wars.
In Butler’s lives of the Saints, there is a reference to a John Woodcock OFM, born in 1603. According to this history, he joined the English Franciscans at Douai and was clothed there in 1631. For some time he lived as a Chaplain and confessor and became a zealous worker on the English mission for many years but suffered from continual sickness and eventually retired to the Convent at Douai. This is the only reference I could find to the existence of a Capuchin Convent at Donay at the time.
There is also mention of a Capuchin Monastery in the list of historical monuments of Douai but other than the above, I can find no other information about this feast.

__
St Agrarius the Martyr
St Amand of Grisalba
St Berthanc of Kirkwall
St Brychan of Brycheiniog
Bl Catherine of Pallanza
St Diogenes of Philippi
St Elstan of Abingdon
St Galla of Rome
St Gennard
St Irenaeus of Sirmium
Bl Jan Franciszek Czartoryski
St Juliana of Cornillon (c 1192-1258) Nun, Mystic “Apostle of the Blessed Sacrament”

St Marcellinus the Martyr
Blessed Maria Karlowska (1865-1935)
About Blessed Maria:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/06/saint-of-the-day-6-april-blessed-maria-karlowska-1865-1935/

Bl Michele Rua
Blessed Notker Balbulus OSB (c 840-912)
Biography:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/06/saint-of-the-day-6-april-blessed-notker-balbulus/

St Phaolô Lê Bao Tinh
St Philaret of Calabria
Bl Pierina Morosini
St Platonides of Ashkelon
St Prudentius of Troyes
St Pope Sixtus I
St Timothy of Philippi
St Ulched
St Urban of Peñalba
St William of Eskilsoe
St Winebald
Blessed Zefirino Agostini (1813-1896)
His Life:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/06/saint-of-the-day-6-april-blessed-zefirino-agostini-1813-1896/

Martyrs of Sirmium : 7 saints – A group of fourth century martyrs at Sirmium, Pannonia (modern Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia). We know little more than seven of their names – Florentius, Geminianus, Moderata, Romana, Rufina, Saturus and Secundus.

Martyred in the Spanish Civil War:
Bl Enric Gispert Domenech
Bl Josep Gomis Martorell

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints – 6 April

St Agrarius the Martyr
St Amand of Grisalba
St Berthanc of Kirkwall
St Brychan of Brycheiniog
Bl Catherine of Pallanza
St Diogenes of Philippi
St Elstan of Abingdon
St Galla of Rome
St Gennard
St Irenaeus of Sirmium
Bl Jan Franciszek Czartoryski
St Marcellinus the Martyr
Bl Maria Karlowska (1865-1935)
About Blessed Maria:  https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/06/saint-of-the-day-6-april-blessed-maria-karlowska-1865-1935/

Bl Michele Rua
Bl Notker Balbulus OSB (c 840-912)
Biography:  https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/06/saint-of-the-day-6-april-blessed-notker-balbulus/

St Phaolô Lê Bao Tinh
St Philaret of Calabria
Bl Pierina Morosini
St Platonides of Ashkelon
St Prudentius of Troyes
St Pope Sixtus I
St Timothy of Philippi
St Ulched
St Urban of Peñalba
St William of Eskilsoe
St Winebald
Bl Zefirino Agostini (1813-1896)

Martyrs of Sirmium : 7 saints – A group of fourth century martyrs at Sirmium, Pannonia (modern Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia). We know little more than seven of their names – Florentius, Geminianus, Moderata, Romana, Rufina, Saturus and Secundus.

Martyred in the Spanish Civil War:
Bl Enric Gispert Domenech
Bl Josep Gomis Martorell

Posted in MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 6 April

Thought for the Day – 6 April

A gracious lovable personality does more than anything else to draw others to holiness.   Some preach by words and some by their whole person.   Blessed Notker Balbulus was one of the latter.   The fact that he was dearly loved by those with whom he lived, is the finest witness to his holiness.   It is not our human looks or physical attributes which draw others to us but a heart of love.

Blessed Notker Balbulus, please pray for us.

BL NOTKER BALBULUS PRAY FOR US

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Saint of the Day – 6 April – Blessed Notker Balbulus

Saint of the Day – 6 April – Blessed Notker Balbulus/Notker the Stammerer/Notker of Saint Gall (c840-912) Benedictine monk. Priest. Poet. Musician. Teacher. Writer. Historian. Hagiographer; wrote a martyrology, a collection of legends and a metrical biography of Saint Gall. Friend of Saint Tutilo – Patron of Musicians and invoked against stammering -Representation:  A rod; Benedictine habit; book in one hand and a broken rod in the other with which he strikes the devil, mill wheel, staff.

220px-Notker_Balbulus_2

Notker was the son of noble Swiss parents.   His father and mother sent him, when he was a child, to be educated in the Benedictine Abbey of St. Gall, Switzerland.    In medieval times Benedictine monks often accepted youngsters as boarding students in their monastery schools.    There may have been an additional reason for entrusting Notker to these monks.    He was frail in health and stammered.   (That is the meaning of his nickname “Balbulus”.)

When he was a teenager, Notker decided to stay on at St. Gall as a monk.    Frailty of body did not keep him from becoming a leader in this religious community.    It was later said of him that he was “weakly in body but not in mind, stammering of tongue but not of intellect, pressing forward boldly in things divine–a vessel filled with the Holy Ghost without equal in his time.”    Notker, a brilliant student, was appointed librarian of the monastery in 890 and held the post of guest master in 892 and 894.

But the stammering little monk gained fame mostly through his own literary work. Having been trained by such able monastic scholars as Iso and the musical Irishman Marcellus (Moengal), he himself became a noted teacher in the monastic school.    Notker was probably the anonymous “Monk of St. Gall” who composed the book Gesta Caroli (The Deeds of Charles), a collection of folk stories about the Emperor Charlemagne.   This popular work did much to make Charlemagne a colossal legendary figure among the German peoples.

In addition to prose, Father Notker, a good theologian, also wrote poetry and composed music, with talent and taste.    In fact, he is considered the first musical composer of German stock.    Some of his musical compositions are hymns in honour of saints.    Most of his fame, however, is based on his two-score sequences.

The sequence is a type of liturgical hymn that originated in the ninth century.    It is a hymn sung after that Alleluia of the Latin Rite Mass that comes just before the singing of the Gospel.   ur liturgy used to have many of these sequences but today the Church retains only the Victimae Paschali (Easter);   the Veni Sancte Spiritus (Pentecost);   the Lauda Sion (Corpus Christi);   and the Stabat Mater (Seven Sorrows of Mary).    (A fifth sequence the Dies Irae for funerals was dropped only after Vatican II).    Now, none of these five sequences was written by Notker but the pattern he gave to the format by his own popular compositions was decisive among later composers.

Notker the Stammerer was so much loved by the monks of his abbey that for a long time after his death, they could not speak of him without shedding tears.    They venerated him as a saint. T   he Holy See confirmed this cult of Blessed Notker in 1512 by permitting a Mass to be celebrated in his honour at the Abbey of St. Gall.    The permission was extended to the diocese of Constance in 1513.    His relics were enshrined in the cathedral of Sankt Gallen in 1628 – see below

Blessed Notker has been declared by some to be the greatest poet of the Middle Ages. Being tongue-tied may impair the speech but it cannot inhibit the soaring imagination.

–Father Robert F. McNamara