Posted in DOMINICAN OP, FEASTS and SOLEMNITIES, FRANCISCAN OFM, MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY, The PASSION, YouTube VIDEOS

Palm Sunday, Nuestra Señora de la Naval / Our Lady of Naval, Manila (1646) and Memorials of the Saints – 10 April

Palm Sunday +2022

Nuestra Señora de la Naval / Our Lady of Naval, Manila (1646) – 10 April:
HERE:

https://anastpaul.com/2021/04/10/easter-saturday-nuestra-senora-de-la-naval-our-lady-of-naval-manila-1646-and-memorials-of-the-saints-10-april/

Blessed Antony Neyrot OP (1425-1460) Martyr, Priest of the Order of Preachers, Priest, an Apostate who reconverted, Penitent.
Biography:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-blessed-antony-neyrot-o-p-1425-1460-martyr/

Bl Antonio Vallesio
St Apollonius of Alexandria
Bl Archangelus Piacentini
St Bademus
St Bede the Younger
St Beocca of Chertsey
Bl Boniface Zukowski
Bl Eberwin of Helfenstein
St Ethor of Chertsey
St Ezekiel the Prophet

St Fulbert of Chartres (c 960-1029) Bishop, Writer, Poet, Reformer, Marian devotee, Preacher, Teacher, Advisor.
About St Fulbert:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-fulbert-of-chartres/

St Gajan
St Hedda of Peterborough

St Macarius of Ghent (Died 1012) Archbishop of Constantinople, Pilgrim and Hermit (without a cell), Apostle of the sick and the needy, Miracle-worker.
Biography:

https://anastpaul.com/2021/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-saint-macarius-of-ghent-died-1012-bishop/

St Magdalena of Canossa (1774-1835) Virgin, Foundress of the Canossian Family of Daughters and Sons of Charity.
Her Story:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-saint-magdalena-of-canossa-1774-1835/

St Malchus of Waterford
Bl Marco Mattia
Blessed Marcus Fantuzzi OFM (c 1405-1479) Priest

St Miguel de Sanctis O.SS.T (1591-1625) Priest of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity and of the Captives also known as the Trinitarian Order or the Trinitarians, Mystic, Penitent, Ecstatic, Apostle of prayer, mortification, of the poor and the sick, he had a special devotion to the Blessed Sacrament and would fall into ecstatic prayer during the Consecration at Holy Mass, so much so, that he became known as “El Extático”, “The Ecstatic.” Pope Pius IX Canonised Miguel on 8 June 1862.
About St Miguel:
https://anastpaul.com/2020/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-miguel-de-sanctis-o-ss-t-1591-1625/

St Palladius of Auxerre
St Paternus the Scot

Martyrs of Carthage – 50 Saints: A group of 50 Christians who were imprisoned in a pen of snakes and scorpions and then Martyred, all during the persecutions of Decius. Only six of their names have come down to us – Africanus, Alessandro, Massimo, Pompeius, Terence and Teodoro. Beheaded in 250 at Carthage.

Martyrs of Georgia: Approximately 6,000 Christian Monks and lay people Martyred in Georgia in 1616 for their faith by a Muslim army led by Shah Abbas I of Persia.

Martyrs of Ostia: A group of criminals who were brought to the faith by Pope Saint Alexander I while he was in prison with them. Drowned by being taken off shore from Ostia, Italy, in a boat which was then scuttled, c 115.

Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Easter Saturday, Nuestra Señora de la Naval / Our Lady of Naval, Manila (1646) and Memorials of the Saints – 10 April

Easter Saturday – The Seventh Day in the Easter Octave +2021

Nuestra Señora de la Naval / Our Lady of Naval, Manila (1646) – 10 April:

The Statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, that is so dearly loved by the Filipino people, is known as Our Lady of Naval. A large statue, she stands 1,5 metres high and is carved of hardwood, although the faces and hands of the Madonna and Child, are of ivory. Our Lady holds a scepter and a golden Rosary and both Mother and Child, are clothed in exquisite gold, a dress and mantle that are heavily embroidered with golden thread.
The lovely Statue was sculpted by a man who was neither Filipino nor a Catholic, and was commissioned in 1593 by the Spanish Governor of the Philippines. The Chinese artist who gave the Virgin somewhat Asian features, was well compensated for his efforts, including being converted to the True Faith through the intercession of the Blessed Mother.

“Fair and comely art thou, terrible as an army set in battle array,” Holy Mother Church chants in her Office and truly, Mary proved herself such, in the battle of “La Naval,” (or Laval), in 1646.
It was while the Spanish still governed the islands that they learned that a fleet of five Dutch war ships were sailing for Manila. The Dutch, bent on foraging and possible conquest, sailed their warships dangerously close to the shores of the Philippine Islands. To both the Filipinos, recently converted to the Catholic faith and the Spanish Conquistadores, devoid of sufficient arms and without warships, an invasion for the purpose of pillage or conquest, was a serious threat. The Dutch were Protestants, hating Catholics and there were no Spanish galleons in the area to defend the islands. There were only two cargo ships, large enough to carry cannon and poorly equipped with a few cannons, they were certainly nothing like the famous Spanish galleons with several banks of big guns. Still, they were all that was available to preserve their faith and their homeland, so they were made ready for battle as best as possible.
The cargo ships were rechristened “La Rosario,” (The Rosary), and “La Encarnacion,” (The Incarnation), and placed under the special patronage of Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary. On the Altars built on deck, the sailors carried the image of their beloved Queen and there, on their knees, officers and crew prayed the Rosary daily and dedicated themselves to La Naval, Our Lady of the Holy Rosary.
The five Dutch warships were well-equipped with cannons, firearms and mariners but when they encountered the two Spanish cargo ships sailing directly for them, they all inexplicably fled from the area in haste. The Spanish and Filipino defenders sailed home in glory, praising Our Lady for her protection.
For the next several months, the two cargo ships patrolled the waters to protect their islands. On one day in July, they were alarmed to discover they had been trapped in a narrow strait by seven Dutch warships. The Dutch did not close the distance to attack, so the men on the cargo ships waited and vowed, that if they were victorious in the coming battle, they would all go on pilgrimage barefoot to the Church of Santo Domingo to thank Our Lady of the Rosary. Through the intercession of Our Lady of La Naval, the Dutch ships left the area and turned toward Manila without even so much as having fired on them. The two cargo ships gave chase, and once again, the Dutch retreated in disgrace. As soon as the victors arrived home, they gratefully fulfilled their vows and went on pilgrimage.
After the third encounter with the Dutch fleet, the people of Manila began to call the cargo ships “the galleons of the miracle” and a fourth confrontation and victory seemed to confirm the name. Yet it was not to be so easy, for the Dutch had prepared a fleet of fifteen warships. This time, with overwhelming numbers, they were determined to attack and restore their honour and pride. Resolved to fight and defeat their enemy at any cost, they were lucky enough to come upon the two cargo ships while they lay at anchor. With the wind against them, they would be unable to move. The crews of the cargo ships were casting off and still preparing for battle as the Dutch sailed down upon them, having every advantage.
Standing their ground, the Spanish and Filipino sailors fearlessly answered the enemy fire as cannonballs landed at their feet shattering the deck or slammed into the great beams that held their bulky ships together. The smoke from their return fire caused their eyes to water and clouded their vision. Hail Mary’s mingled with the roar of battle; the Rosary beads dangling from the necks of the men as they whole-heartedly launched into the fray. Firing and praying incessantly as the day wore on, they bore the repeated volleys of the enemy and answered back with accurate fire that repelled the closest warships, while others retreated afire and heavily trailing smoke. When the battle finally ended, the Dutch were once again put to flight and only fifteen of the Filipino-Spanish forces were killed. The two meager cargo ships, unable to move, had fought and defeated the enemy, so badly, that they limped away, never to return.

A bas relief commemorating the Battle on the facade of the Church

This naval victory at Manila is similar in many respects to the great naval victory at Lepanto, which was also credited to the intervention of Our Lady and the power of her Holy Rosary. In both instances, Our Lady miraculously defended and granted victory to the seamen who placed their trust in her.
Grateful to their heavenly protectress, Our Lady of Naval, the men fulfilled their vows after the battle, which consisted in going to the Church of Santo Domingo at Manila barefoot and instituting a public and perpetual feast in honour of the Mother of God. Even to this day that promise has been fulfilled by the Filipinos, who since that memorable time, have taken as their own, that pledge made by their heroic ancestors.

Procession before the enthronement of Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary of La Naval which occurs every year at the commemoration of her victory.

On 9 April 1662, the Cathedral chapter of the Archdiocese of Manila, declared the naval victory a miraculous event owed to the intercession of the Virgin Mary, declaring:

Granted by the Sovereign Lord through the intercession of the Most Holy Virgin and devotion to her Rosary, that the miracles be celebrated, preached and held in festivities and to be recounted amongst the miracles wrought by the Lady of the Rosary, for the greater devotion of the faithful to Our Most Blessed Virgin Mary and Her Holy Rosary.

Our Lady of Naval in the Cathedral of Santo Domingo. The Statue is enthroned above the High Altar during the month of October.

Saint Pope Pius X granted the Statue a Canonical Coronation in 1907 and the Philippine government has designated, Our Lady of Naval as a National Treasure.

The massive annual procession of Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary of Naval

The Church of Santo Domingo was damaged several times by fire and earthquakes and was finally destroyed by bombs in 1941, yet, the Statue has never been damaged! Our Lady of La Naval is presently treasured by the Filipino people, in the new Santo Domingo Church in Quezon City, a few miles from Manila.

The new Santo Domingo
The bas relief on the facade

Blessed Antony Neyrot OP (1425-1460) Martyr
Biography:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-blessed-antony-neyrot-o-p-1425-1460-martyr/

Bl Antonio Vallesio
St Apollonius of Alexandria
Bl Archangelus Piacentini
St Bademus
St Bede the Younger
St Beocca of Chertsey
Bl Boniface Zukowski
Bl Eberwin of Helfenstein
St Ethor of Chertsey
St Ezekiel the Prophet
St Fulbert of Chartres (c 960-1029) Bishop
About St Fulbert:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-fulbert-of-chartres/

St Gajan
St Hedda of Peterborough
St Macarius of Ghent (Died 1012) Bishop
St Magdalena of Canossa (1774-1835)
Her Story:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-saint-magdalena-of-canossa-1774-1835/

St Malchus of Waterford
Bl Marco Mattia
Bl Mark Fantucci
St Miguel de Sanctis O.SS.T (1591-1625)
About St Miguel:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-miguel-de-sanctis-o-ss-t-1591-1625/
St Palladius of Auxerre
St Paternus the Scot

Martyrs of Carthage – 50 saints: A group of 50 Christians who were imprisoned in a pen of snakes and scorpions, and then martyred, all during the persecutions of Decius. Only six of their names have come down to us – Africanus, Alessandro, Massimo, Pompeius, Terence and Teodoro. Beheaded in 250 at Carthage.

Martyrs of Georgia: Approximately 6,000 Christian monks and lay people martyred in Georgia in 1616 for their faith by a Muslim army led by Shah Abbas I of Persia.

Martyrs of Ostia: A group of criminals who were brought to the faith by Pope Saint Alexander I while he was in prison with them. Drowned by being taken off shore from Ostia, Italy, in a boat which was then scuttled, c 115.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Friday of the Passion of the Lord +2020 and Memorials of the Saints -10 April

Friday of the Passion of the Lord +2020

Bl Antony Neyrot OP (1425-1460) Martyr
Biography:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-blessed-antony-neyrot-o-p-1425-1460-martyr/

Bl Antonio Vallesio
St Apollonius of Alexandria
Bl Archangelus Piacentini
St Bademus
St Bede the Younger
St Beocca of Chertsey
Bl Boniface Zukowski
Bl Eberwin of Helfenstein
St Ethor of Chertsey
St Ezekiel the Prophet
St Fulbert of Chartres (c 960-1029) Bishop
About St Fulbert:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-fulbert-of-chartres/

St Gajan
St Hedda of Peterborough
St Macarius of Antioch
St Magdalena of Canossa (1774-1835)
Her Story:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-saint-magdalena-of-canossa-1774-1835/

St Malchus of Waterford
Bl Marco Mattia
Bl Mark Fantucci
St Miguel de Sanctis O.SS.T (1591-1625)
St Palladius of Auxerre
St Paternus the Scot

Martyrs of Carthage – 50 saints: A group of 50 Christians who were imprisoned in a pen of snakes and scorpions, and then martyred, all during the persecutions of Decius. Only six of their names have come down to us – Africanus, Alessandro, Massimo, Pompeius, Terence and Teodoro. Beheaded in 250 at Carthage.

Martyrs of Georgia: Approximately 6,000 Christian monks and lay people martyred in Georgia in 1616 for their faith by a Muslim army led by Shah Abbas I of Persia.

Martyrs of Ostia: A group of criminals who were brought to the faith by Pope Saint Alexander I while he was in prison with them. Drowned by being taken off shore from Ostia, Italy, in a boat which was then scuttled, c 115.

Posted in SAINT of the DAY, YouTube VIDEOS

Memorials of the Saints – 10 April

Bl Antony Neyrot OP (1425-1460) Martyr
Biography:  https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-blessed-antony-neyrot-o-p-1425-1460-martyr/

Bl Antonio Vallesio
St Apollonius of Alexandria
Bl Archangelus Piacentini
St Bademus
St Bede the Younger
St Beocca of Chertsey
Bl Boniface Zukowski
Bl Eberwin of Helfenstein
St Ethor of Chertsey
St Ezekiel the Prophet
St Fulbert of Chartres (c 960-1029) Bishop
About St Fulbert:  https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/saint-of-the-day-10-april-st-fulbert-of-chartres/

St Gajan
St Hedda of Peterborough
St Macarius of Antioch
St Magdalena of Canossa (1774-1835)

St Malchus of Waterford
Bl Marco Mattia
Bl Mark Fantucci
St Michael de Sanctis
St Palladius of Auxerre
St Paternus the Scot

Martyrs of Carthage – 50 saints: A group of 50 Christians who were imprisoned in a pen of snakes and scorpions, and then martyred, all during the persecutions of Decius. Only six of their names have come down to us – Africanus, Alessandro, Massimo, Pompeius, Terence and Teodoro. Beheaded in 250 at Carthage.

Martyrs of Georgia: Approximately 6,000 Christian monks and lay people martyred in Georgia in 1616 for their faith by a Muslim army led by Shah Abbas I of Persia.

Martyrs of Ostia: A group of criminals who were brought to the faith by Pope Saint Alexander I while he was in prison with them. Drowned by being taken off shore from Ostia, Italy, in a boat which was then scuttled, c 115.

Posted in ART DEI, MORNING Prayers, SAINT of the DAY

Thought for the Day – 10 April

Thought for the Day – 10 April

Chartres Cathedral has been called a “sermon in stone and stained glass” and it demonstrates what can happen when faith bursts into culture.   St Fulbert of Chartres recognised that unless faith influences culture, it’s voice remains weak.   It is not enough to believe – we have to make the Christian faith part of our lives and part of the world we live in.   So, as Chartres teaches and impacts our hearts and minds with awe and faith, so our lives too should be a “school of faith” and teach our world with awe and belief!

St Fulbert pray for us!

ST FULBERT PRAY FOR US 2

 

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, LENT, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The WORD

One Minute Reflection – 10 April

One Minute Reflection – 10 April

Father, into your hands I commend my spirit……Luke 23:45-46

REFLECTION – “He died, but He vanquished death; in Himself He put an end to what we feared;  He took it upon Himself and He vanquished it, as a mighty hunter He captured and slew the lion.
Where is death? Seek it in Christ, for it exists no longer; but it did exist and now it is dead.
O life, O death of death!  Be of good heart; it will die in us, also.   What has taken place in our head will take place in His members; death will die in us also.   But when?   At the end of the world, at the resurrection of the dead in which we believe and concerning which we do not doubt.”…………….St Augustine (Sermon 233:3-4)

PRAYER – God of love, my prayer is simple:  Your son, Jesus, suffered and died for me.
I know only that I cannot have real strength unless I rely on You.   I cannot feel protected from my many weaknesses until I turn to You for forgiveness and your unalterable love. Help me to share this strength, protection and love with others.   St Fulbert of Chartres you worked your whole life to bring the truth and love of God to all, please pray for us, amen.

LUKE 23-45-46he died but he vanquished death-st augustineST FULBERTPRAY FOR US

Posted in ART DEI, SAINT of the DAY, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Saint of the Day – 10 April – St Fulbert of Chartres

Saint of the Day – 10 April – St Fulbert of Chartres (c960 in Italy-1029 in Chartres, France) Bishop, Writer, Poet, Reformer, Marian devotee, Preacher, Teacher, Advisor – Attributes – preaching monk, in his sick bed with the Virgin Mary nearby.

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Fulbert was born in Italy around the year 960.    He was taught by the famous Gerbert, who became Pope Sylvester II in the year 999.    Fulbert followed Pope Sylvester to Rome. When Pope Sylvester II died in 1003, Fulbert went to France where he started a school at Chartres.    This school was the most famous seat of education in France.    Scholars from all over France, Italy, Germany and England attended school there.    Fulbert became chancellor of the church of Chartres and was the treasurer of St. Hilary’s at Poitiers. Later he was elected bishop of Chartres and he rebuilt the cathedral when it burned down.    He had the assistance of King Canute of England, Duke William of Aquitaine and other European leaders in rebuilding the cathedral in great splendour.

The veneration of the Virgin Mary was already established in the Church and Fulbert use this to teach her importance.    The results were twofold, it helped to ease people’s fears and greatly expanded the Marian Cult and Chartres’s position in it.   Chartres was already involved due to its being the holder of a sacred relic of Mary’s, the “Sancta Camisia”, (Holy Tunic), which has been variously described as being worn by Mary during the Annunciation or during the birth of Christ.   This tunic was already the subject of a miracle because of its use by an earlier bishop of Chartres, Gauscelinus, in 911 to ward off the invading Normans.    Fulbert expanded on the theme of miracles involving Mary, especially those cases where she had interceded between sinners and God.    In this way people could pray for Mary’s intercession with God on their behalf in the perceived coming apocalypse.   Fulbert himself was involved in one of these miracles;   when he was gravely ill Mary had healed him with a drop of milk because of his devotion to her.    This also served to give Mary the image of not only the mother of Christ but for all who believed in her, their mother too.    All of this led to Fulbert’s ultimate goal of promoting a special feast day to celebrate Mary’s Nativity.

To gain popular support for this feast, Fulbert wrote his famous sermon “Approbate Consuetudinis” in which he relates Mary’s miracles.    He also brings in the evidence of Mary’s family lineage, which the Bible traces back to King David.    In his sermon Fulbert used the symbolism of the “Stirps Jesse” (Tree of Jesse) to help explain Mary’s familial relationship to the great men of the past and how it was determined, as described in Scripture, that she would be the one to whom Christ would be born.   This again served to enhance her importance to the world and convince people of the need to celebrate her birth.   This sermon led to a number of liturgical changes throughout the next few centuries in Europe.   The sermon itself, or variations of it and the chants associated with it, became part of the service for the feast day of Mary’s Nativity on 8 September    By promoting the Feast day of Mary’s Nativity, Fulbert was able to advance the importance of Mary and therefore the cult of her veneration grew.    This in turn enhanced the importance of the Cathedral of Chartres as a centre for Marian devotion and also gave people a spiritual symbol to turn to in times of need at the turn of the millennium.

During his time in Chartres Fulbert played an important role in the development and spread of the ideas that led to the Gregorian church reforms of the eleventh century under Pope Gregory VII.    These reforms concerned the division between the powers of church and state, especially in the appointment of new abbots and bishops.    In the eleventh century the secular rulers had a habit of appointing whomever they wanted to fill vacant church positions.    Fulbert and some of his students, such as Abbot Albert of Marmoutier, routinely wrote that it was up to the clergy and the citizens of the diocese involved to elect a replacement, the authority being found in the rulings of the First Council of Nicaea (325) and the Council of Antioch (264-272).    These reforms also stated that the Church, not the state, was responsible for disciplining the clergy.    The issues of simony (the buying of church offices) and immoral clerics were also addressed by Fulbert.    Although the reforms were issued by Gregory VII, some of its ideas came from Fulbert, whose writings were disseminated through his students.

After Chartres Cathedral burned in 1020, Fulbert devoted his energies to raising funds for its rebuilding, which was completed in 1037, nine years after his death.   In 1194 the cathedral was again almost completely destroyed by fire; only the crypt, some of the west facade and two towers remained.    The crypt has been incorporated into all subsequent reconstructions.    The construction of the Gothic-style cathedral that stands to-day began afterward.   It is in this cathedral that we see Fulbert’s influences that resulted from his promotion of the Feast day of Mary’s Nativity and the cult of the Virgin Mary.   The sculptures around the three portals depict the life of Mary, who is the central figure in the Royal Portal.   One of the cathedral’s stained glass windows depicts the Tree of Jesse, which traces Mary’s family and the Holy Family, again a reference to Fulbert’s teachings in regards to the Feast of Mary’s Nativity.

St Fulbert died of natural causes on April 10, 1029.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, we pray that St. Fulbert will intercede for our clergy when they need strengthening to make the right decisions.    May they always stay true to Church teachings and to You, we pray.  Amen.