Posted in MARIAN TITLES, SAINT of the DAY

Passion Sunday or the Fifth Suday of Lent +2021, Our Lady of Bruges, Flanders (1150 and Memorials of the Saints – 21 March

Passion Sunday or the Fifth Suday of Lent +2021
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Our Lady of Bruges, Flanders (1150), where a lock of Our Lady’s hair is preserved – 21 March:

Michelangelo Buonarroti; Bruges Madonna; https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/work-of-art/O1822 Credit line: (c) (c) Royal Academy of Arts /

At a Shrine in Flanders, dedicated to Mary, it is reported that a lock of Our Lady’s hair is preserved, given by a Syrian Bishop, named Mocca.
This Shrine is likewise said to have its famous relic of the Holy Blood, which is the centre of much pilgrimage. The precious relic was brought from Palestine by Thierry of Alsace on his return from the second crusade. From 1150 this relic has been venerated with much devotion. The annual pilgrimage attended by the nobility in their quaint robes takes place on the Monday following the first Sunday in May. Not only the Flemish nobility take part, but also thousands of pilgrims from all over Christendom.
Every Friday the relic is less solemnly exposed for the veneration of the Faithful. As mentioned above, the Shrine is dedicated to Mary, for it was she who gave her own blood to her Divine Son, the God-Man.
As at all the Marian Shrines, miracles take place through the intercession of the Mother of God.
The present Gothic Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Bruges was built in 1225 and is famous for its 400 foot tall brick tower. Inside, however, is where the real treasures are kept. Among those relics already mentioned, there is also a Madonna of Bruges, a marble sculpture of the Blessed Virgin and the Divine Child sculpted by Michelangelo.

The features of the Blessed Virgin depicted in the Madonna of Bruges are very similar in appearance to the famous Pieta, which Michelangelo was said to have completed just prior to this sculpture. It is the only one of his works that left Italy during Michelangelo’s lifetime and was purchased and brought to Bruges by a wealthy merchant.
In 1794 the inhabitants of Bruges were forced by the French Revolutionaries to ship the Madonna of Bruges to Paris. It was fortunate that the Statue was not destroyed, as so many Catholic works of art were during the French Revolution. TheSstatue did not remain long in Paris, as it was returned to Bruges after the defeat of Emperor Napoleon. It was taken again in 1944 when the German’s retreated from Belgium, but it was discovered two years later in Germany and returned once again to Bruges.
As a precaution, after a bomb was set before the Statue of the Pieta in Saint Peter’s Basilica in 1972, the Madonna of Bruges was placed behind bulletproof glass, so that the public can now only admire the sculpture from several feet away.

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Alfonso de Rojas
St Augustine Tchao
St Benedetta Cambiagio Frassinello (1791 – 1858)
Biography:

https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/21/saint-of-the-day-21-march-st-benedetta-cambiagio-frassinello-1791-1858/
St Birillus of Catania
St Christian of Cologne
St Domninus of Rome
St Enda of Aran (c 450 – c 530)
About St Enda:

https://anastpaul.com/2020/03/21/saint-of-the-day-21-march-st-enda-of-aran-c-450-c-530-patriarch-of-irish-monasticism/
St Isenger of Verdun
St James the Confessor
Bl John of Valence
Bl Lucia of Verona
St Lupicinus of Condat
Bl Mark Gjani
Bl Matthew Flathers
St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)
About St Nicholas:

https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/saint-of-the-day-21-march-st-nicholas-of-flue-1417-1487/
St Serapion the Scolastic (Died c 354-370) Bishop
St Philemon of Rome
Bl Santuccia Terrebotti

Bl Thomas Pilcher
Bl William Pike

Martyrs of Alexandria: A large but unknown number of Catholics massacred in several churches during Good Friday services in Alexandria, Egypt by Arian heretics during the persecutions of Constantius and Philagrio. They were martyred on Good Friday in 342 in Alexandria, Egypt.

Posted in CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, CCC, LENTEN PRAYERS & NOVENAS, Our MORNING Offering, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, PRAYERS of the SAINTS

Our Morning offering – 14 March – My Lord and my God

Our Morning offering – 14 March – Laetare Sunday

My Lord and my God
By St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

My Lord and my God,
take from me everything
that distances me from You.
My Lord and my God,
give me everything
that brings me closer to You.
My Lord and my God,
detach me from myself
to give my all to You.
Amen

Posted in "Follow Me", DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on CHARITY, QUOTES on FORGIVENESS, QUOTES on HUMILITY, QUOTES on LOVE, QUOTES on MERCY, QUOTES on PERSECUTION, QUOTES on PERSEVERANCE, QUOTES on PRIDE, QUOTES on SANCTITY, The WORD

Quote/s of the Day – 6 September – “If your brother sins against you” Matthew 18:15-17

Quote/s of the Day – 6 September – Twenty Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Readings: Ezekiel 33:7-9, Psalms 95:1-2, 6-7, 8-9, Romans 13:8-10, Matthew 18:15-20

“If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone.
If he listens to you, you have gained your brother.
But if he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses.
If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church.”

Matthew 18:15-17

“You shall not hate your brother in your heart
but you shall reason with your neighbour,
lest you bear sin because of him.
You shall not take vengeance
or bear any grudge against the sons of your own people
but, you shall love your neighbour as yourself: I am the Lord”

Leviticus 19:17-18

“Someone who shows no clemency,
who is not clothed with the bowels of mercy and tears,
no matter what sort of student he is in spirituality,
such a one does not fulfil the law of Christ.”

St Jerome (347-420)
Priest, Translator of the Bible,
Father & Doctor of the Church

“If you do not close your ear to others,
you open God’s ear to yourself.”

“If you want God to know that you are hungry,
know that another is hungry.
If you hope for mercy, show mercy.
If you look for kindness, show kindness.
If you want to receive, give.
If you ask for yourself what you deny to others,
your asking is a mockery.”

St Peter Chrysologus (400-450)
Bishop of Ravenna, Father & Doctor of the Church

An excerpt from his Sermon 43

“Be gentle to the weak,
firm to the stubborn,
steadfast to the proud,
humble to the lowly.”

St Columban (543-615)

“Charity may be
a very short word
but with its tremendous
meaning of pure love,
it sums up man’s
entire relation to God
and to his neighbour.”

St Aelred of Rievaulx (1110-1167)

“See to it that you refrain from harsh words.
But if you do speak them,
do not be ashamed to apply the remedy
from the same lips, that inflicted the wounds.”

St Francis of Paola OM (1416-1507)

“O man, when the world hates you and is faithless toward you,
think of your God, how He was struck and spat upon.
You should not accuse your neighbour of guilt
but pray to God, that He be merciful to you both.”

St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

“You must be reconciled with your enemies,
speak to them as if they had never done you
anything but good all your life,
keeping nothing in your heart but the charity,
which the good Christian should have for everyone,
so that we can all appear with confidence
before the tribunal of God.”

St John Vianney (1786-1859)

Posted in SAINT of the DAY

Memorials of the Saints -21 March

Alfonso de Rojas
St Augustine Tchao
St Benedetta Cambiagio Frassinello (1791 – 1858)
Biography:
https://anastpaul.com/2019/03/21/saint-of-the-day-21-march-st-benedetta-cambiagio-frassinello-1791-1858/
St Birillus of Catania
St Christian of Cologne
St Domninus of Rome
St Enda of Aran (c 450 – c 530)
St Isenger of Verdun
St James the Confessor
Bl John of Valence
Bl Lucia of Verona
St Lupicinus of Condat
Bl Mark Gjani
Bl Matthew Flathers
St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)
About St Nicholas:
https://anastpaul.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/saint-of-the-day-21-march-st-nicholas-of-flue-1417-1487/

St Philemon of Rome
Bl Santuccia Terrebotti
Bl Thomas Pilcher
Bl William Pike

Martyrs of Alexandria: A large but unknown number of Catholics massacred in several churches during Good Friday services in Alexandria, Egypt by Arian heretics during the persecutions of Constantius and Philagrio. They were martyred on Good Friday in 342 in Alexandria, Egypt.

Posted in DIVINE MERCY, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on FORGIVENESS, QUOTES on HUMILITY, QUOTES on SUFFERING, The PASSION

Quote of the Day – 13 March – ‘O man, when the world hates you …’

Quote of the Day – 13 March – Friday of the Second Week of Lent

“O man, when the world hates you and is faithless toward you,
think of your God, how He was struck and spat upon.
You should not accuse your neighbour of guilt
but pray to God, that He be merciful to you both.”

St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)o-man-when-the-world-hates-you-st-nicholas-of-flue-21march2019 and 13 march 2020

Posted in CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, CCC, Our MORNING Offering, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, PRAYERS of the SAINTS

Our Morning offering – 13 March – My Lord and my God

Our Morning offering – 13 March – Friday of the Second Week of lent

My Lord and my God
By St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

My Lord and my God,
take from me everything
that distances me from You.
My Lord and my God,
give me everything
that brings me closer to You.
My Lord and my God,
detach me from myself
to give my all to You.
Amen

The above prayer of St Nicholas, is cited in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in paragraph #226.
CCC 226It means making good use of created things – faith in God, the only One, leads us to use everything that is not God, only insofar as it brings us closer to Him and to detach ourselves from it, insofar, as it turns us away from Him.my lord and my god by st nicholas of lue ccc 226 13 march 2020

Posted in LENT 2019, LENTEN THOUGHTS, ON the SAINTS, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, QUOTES on FAITH, QUOTES on FASTING, QUOTES on GRACE, QUOTES on PRAYER, QUOTES on SANCTITY, SAINT of the DAY, The PASSION

Lenten Thoughts – 21 March – The Primacy of the Spiritual:  Saint Nicholas of Flue

Lenten Thoughts – 21 March – Thursday of the Second week of Lent, Year C and the Memorial of St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

The Primacy of the Spiritual:  Saint Nicholas of Flue (Excerpt)
By Christopher O Blum

Born to a pious, upstanding peasant family, young Nicholas stood out for his goodness, simplicity and mortification.   While still a young man, labouring in the fields and meadows of the valleys south of Lucerne, he fasted four times per week, explaining himself, when pressed, by saying, “Such is the will of God.”   Until his fiftieth year, his life was that of an exemplary Swiss free man.   Like many of his fellow countrymen, he served his canton both under arms and by holding civic office.   And this pillar of the community raised up five sons and five daughters with the help of his exemplary wife Dorothy.   Yet God persisted in calling him to a life beyond that of the domestic holiness he had already embraced and sent visions to him in his late-night prayer vigils and his moments of afternoon solitude in the fields, visions that beckoned him to leave all.st nicholas of flue pray for us 21 march 2019 no 2.jpg

As the eminent Swiss theologian Charles Cardinal Journet (1891-1975) explained in his biography of the hermit-saint, “it no longer sufficed for him to walk along the roads of the world with God in his heart, he had to take the path set aside for him, that he might be taken by the hand and led to where he knew not.”   What praise of Dorothy of Flue could be lovelier, Journet asked, than to admire her magnanimity in being able to “comprehend the drama of this great soul”?   They parted friends, just thirteen weeks after the birth of their youngest child and remained so.   Several years later, a pilgrim visitor to Nicholas’ hermitage saw the saint, with joyous mien, lean out of the window of his tiny cell after the morning Mass to greet his family with a blessing:  “May God give you a blessed day, dear friends and good people!”

Nicholas had initially thought to join a monastery, perhaps one in nearby Alsace known for its austerity.   But a chance conversation with a peasant helped him to understand another of his mystical visions – this one of the nearby town of Liestal wrapped in flames. His good works were needed in his own neighbourhood.   And so, he built himself a hermitage one valley over from his home and spent the next twenty years there, clad only in a tunic, with bare feet and a bare head, to do penance for his beloved people.   His piety was simple, for he was illiterate.   A neighbouring priest had taught him the practice of meditating on Christ’s Passion in stages to match the seven canonical hours of the Church’s daily prayer.   This method bore good results.   He soon became known for the wisdom and holiness of his counsel and pilgrims flocked to his hidden valley to listen to his simple, direct words:  “O man, when the world hates you and is faithless toward you, think of your God, how he was struck and spat upon.   You should not accuse your neighbour of guilt but pray to God, that he be merciful to you both.”

Writing during the Second World War, Cardinal Journet saw in Nicholas of Flue the “supreme incarnation of the genius of Switzerland.”   By this he did not mean that the hermit was a pacifist.   He was something higher and more important.   His greatness “was to have affirmed the primacy of the spiritual life.”   “For the saints”, the Cardinal explained, “are sent to us by God as so many sermons.   We do not use them, it is they who move us and lead us, to where we had not expected to go.”   Those were years of exceptional trial for the Swiss but they were also years in which men and women of good will prepared the ground for spiritual renewal and rebuilding.the saints are sent to us by god - card charles journet 21 march 2019.jpg

What lesson might Nicholas of Flue hold out for our generation?   Were he alive today this simple Swiss peasant would doubtless be startled by our wealth.   The recession of recent years seems to have done little to dull the edge of our consumption.   The adjective “worldly” is now being used as a term of approbation, to signify the savoir-faire of the person who knows the latest fashions and ways of thinking.   It is a telling linguistic development.   Nicholas of Flue spent the last twenty years of his life in a tiny room with two windows.   Through one of them, he could see something of the beauty of his native land, a beauty that nourished his reflection and piety:  “O man, think of the sun so high in the sky and consider its splendour – but your soul has received the splendour of the eternal God.”   Through the other, he saw the altar, whence came the very food of his soul.   “We should carry the Passion of God in our hearts, for this is the greatest consolation to a man at the hour of his death.”   The one thing needful indeed.we should carry the passion of god - 21 march 2019 st nicholas of flue.jpg

My Lord and my God
St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

My Lord and my God,
take from me everything
that distances me from You.
My Lord and my God,
give me everything
that brings me closer to You.
My Lord and my God,
detach me from myself
to give my all to You.
Amen

The above prayer of St Nicholas, is cited in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in paragraph #226.
CCC 226 – It means making good use of created things: faith in God, the only One, leads us to use everything that is not God only insofar as it brings us closer to Him and to detach ourselves from it insofar as it turns us away from Him.

prayer-of-st-nicholas-of-flue-no-226-my-lord-and-my-god-take-from-me-everything-21-march-20181.jpg

Posted in QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on SUFFERING, SAINT of the DAY

Quote/s of the Day – 21 March – St Nicholas of Flue

Quote/s of the Day – 21 March – Thursday of the Second week of Lent, Year C and the Memorial of St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

“O man,
when the world hates you
and is faithless toward you,
think of your God,
how He was struck and spat upon.
You should not accuse your neighbour of guilt
but pray to God,
that He be merciful to you both.”

St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)o man when the world hates you - st nicholas of flue 21march2019.jpg

Posted in LENT, MORNING Prayers, ON the SAINTS, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SAINT of the DAY, The PASSION

Thought for the Day – 21 March – The Memorial of St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487)

Thought for the Day – 21 March – The Memorial of St Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487) and Wednesday of the 5th Week of Lent 2018  (this reflection includes our Lenten Reflection for today.)

Although our minds are limited in their ability to attain God in this life, we are capable of “greater desire and love, and pleasure in knowing divine matters” than we are able to find in “the perfect knowledge of the lowest things.”   Thus far Aquinas, who taught as one who knew.   Saint Nicholas of Flue (1417-1487) was in perfect agreement.   “God,” he once said, “gives us such a taste for prayer that we yearn for it as if we were waiting to go to a dance.”

The likeness was more than a bit incongruous, for the speaker was a true hermit, a man who had given up not only dances but nearly everything else that bound him to this world, even food.   Born to a pious, upstanding peasant family, young Nicholas stood out for his goodness, simplicity and mortification.   While still a young man, labouring in the fields and meadows of the valleys south of Lucerne, he fasted four times per week, explaining himself, when pressed, by saying, “Such is the will of God.”   Until his fiftieth year, his life was that of an exemplary Swiss free man.   Like many of his fellow countrymen, he served his canton both under arms and by holding civic office.   And this pillar of the community raised up five sons and five daughters with the help of his exemplary wife Dorothy.   Yet God persisted in calling him to a life beyond that of the domestic holiness he had already embraced and sent visions to him in his late-night prayer vigils and his moments of afternoon solitude in the fields, visions that beckoned him to leave all.

As the eminent Swiss theologian Charles Cardinal Journet (1891-1975) explained in his biography of the hermit-saint, “it no longer sufficed for him to walk along the roads of the world with God in his heart;  he had to take the path set aside for him, that he might be taken by the hand and led to where he knew not.”   What praise of Dorothy of Flue could be lovelier, Journet asked, than to admire her magnanimity in being able to    They parted friends, just thirteen weeks after the birth of their youngest child and remained so.   Several years later, a pilgrim visitor to Nicholas’ hermitage saw the saint, with joyous mien, lean out of the window of his tiny cell after the morning Mass to greet his family with a blessing:  “May God give you a blessed day, dear friends and good people!”  One is glad to know that his wife and children attended his deathbed.   After all, she had never lost her husband completely.   Honoured by Swiss Protestants, venerated by Swiss Catholics, Nicholas’s cult, uninterrupted since his death, was officially sanctioned by Clement IX (1667-9).  In 1947 he was canonised by Pope Pius XII.

What lesson might Nicholas of Flue hold out for our generation?   Were he alive today this simple Swiss peasant would doubtless be startled by our wealth.   The recession of recent years seems to have done little to dull the edge of our consumption.   The adjective “worldly” is now being used as a term of approbation, to signify the savoir-faire of the person who knows the latest fashions and ways of thinking.   It is a telling linguistic development.   Nicholas of Flue spent the last twenty years of his life in a tiny room with two windows.   Through one of them, he could see something of the beauty of his native land, a beauty that nourished his reflection and piety:  “O man, think of the sun so high in the sky and consider its splendour:  but your soul has received the splendour of the eternal God.”   Through the other, he saw the altar, whence came the very food of his soul.   “We should carry the Passion of God in our hearts, for this is the greatest consolation to a man at the hour of his death.”   The one thing needful indeed.st nicholas of flue pray for us - 21 march 2018-no 2