Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MARIAN QUOTES, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 14 April – God with Us! St John XXIII

Sunday Reflection – 14 April – Palm Sunday, Year C

God with Us!
St John XXIII (1881-1963)

This is the great reality of Christian history – Jesus, the Sacred Host, the Bread of Life, in the midst of His Church.
This is that brightest Star which enables us to look forward with great confidence to the future Kingdom of Christ.   And, as we bless and adore Jesus in the most Holy Eucharist, we wish to raise our hearts in trustful prayer to Mary, His sweet Mother and our Mother too.

So let us turn to her, as our own dear Mother.   It is she, who bore and presented to the world, Jesus, our Redeemer and Saviour.   It is she, who leads innocent souls and penitent souls, to Jesus.   It was at her request at the wedding at Cana that our Saviour worked His first great miracle, to the joy and delight of all believers.

In her sanctuary of Lourdes and in so many other sanctuaries all over the world, she continues her motherly and pious task of leading to her Divine Son’s arms, all who pray to her, for the safety, peace and joy of the Holy Universal Church.   Is this not the literal accomplishment of our fervent resole – “to Jesus through Mary?”

Let us then understand one another, beloved children, as we worship Jesus in the Holy Eucharist – God with us!   God with us!

The Sacrament of Jesus, remains with us as our divine inheritance, for our salvation and for the joy of the Catholic and Apostolic Church.

When we pray before the Blessed Sacrament, may the Mother of Jesus, who is our Mother, continually be remembered, as our intercessor and protectress, the joy and gladness of our hearts.   Amen.god with us - this is the great reality - st john XXIII 14 april 2019.jpg

Posted in SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 7 April – Come to the altar with your wounds and scars.

Sunday Reflection – 7 April – The Fifth Sunday of Lent, Year C

Every moment of your life is a preparation for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, just as every moment of My life was a preparation for and a slow ascent to the Sacrifice of the Cross.   Understand this and you will see that nothing in your life is foreign to My plan for you, that everything you have done and that every place you have ever been and that every person with whom you have been or are connected, is part of My design for your life.

When you bring to your Mass all that you have experienced — your whole life story — you allow Me to redeem those things that are most dark, bitter and painful by taking them into the mystery of My Sacrifice.

Come to the altar with your wounds and scars.   Give them to Me and I shall unite them to My own sufferings and so make them shine in My sight.   Come to the altar with your sins, even with those of which you are most ashamed and I shall show you that I have already taken them upon Myself and expiated them in my Blood.   Come to the altar with every troubled and broken relationship of your past, with every betrayal, every failure, and every falling away from holiness and I shall cast all these things into the ocean of My mercy, never again to be recovered, or named, or used by the Accuser against you.

(From In Sinu Iesu, The Journal of a Priest)when you bring to mass - in sinu jesus - 7 april 2019 sun reflection .jpg

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on HAPPINESS, QUOTES on JOY, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 31 March – “The Joy of the Eucharist, all through Life!”

Sunday Reflection – 31 March – “Laetare” Fourth Sunday of Lent, Year C

“The Joy of the Eucharist, all through Life!”

St John Vianney (1786-1859)

“When Jesus entered the house of St Elizabeth, although He was imprisoned in Mary’s womb, He sanctified both mother and child and Elizabeth exclaimed, “Whence comes so great a happiness to me, that the Mother of my God deigns to come to me?”

I leave you to consider how much greater is the happiness of him who receives Jesus Christ in Holy Communion, not like Elizabeth, into his house but into the depths of his heart, to be its protecting Master, not six months, as in Elizabeth’s case but all through life!”

i leave you to consider - st john vianney sun refl 31 march 2019 laetare sun.jpg

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 24 March – Jesus, Our Daily Sacrifice

Sunday Reflection – 24 March – The Third Sunday of Lent, Year C

Jesus, Our Daily Sacrifice
Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890)

Our Lord not only offered Himself as a Sacrifice on the Cross but He makes Himself a perpetual, a daily Sacrifice, to the end of time.

In the Holy Mass, that One Sacrifice on the Cross once offered is renewed, continued, applied to our benefit.

He seems to say,
“My Cross was raised up 2000 years ago and only for a few hours – and very few of My servants were present there – but I intend to bring millions into My Church.   For their sakes, then, I will perpetuate My Sacrifice, that each of them may be as though they had severally been present on Calvary.

I will offer Myself up day by day to the Father, that everyone of My followers may have the opportunity to offer his petitions to Him, sanctified and recommended by the all-meritorious virtue of My Passion.

Thus, I will be a Priest forever, after the order of Melchisedech – My priests shall stand at the altar – but not they but rather I, will offer.   I will not let them offer mere bread and wine but I Myself will be present upon the altar instead and I will offer up Myself invisibly, while they perform the outward rite.”

jesus our daily sacrifice bl john henry newman 24 march 2019 sun reflection.jpg

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, THOMAS a KEMPIS, Uncategorized

Sunday Reflection – 10 March – “What does Jesus Christ do in the Eucharist? – St John Vianney

Sunday Reflection – 10 March – The First Sunday of Lent

“What does Jesus Christ do in the Eucharist?

It is God, who, as our Saviour, offers Himself each day for us to His Father’s justice.

If you are in difficulties and sorrows, He will comfort and relieve you.
If you are sick, He will either cure you or give you strength to suffer, so as to merit Heaven.
If the devil, the world and the flesh are making war upon you, He will give you the weapons with which to fight, to resist and to win the victory.
If you are poor, he will enrich you with all sorts of riches for time and for eternity.
Let us open the door of His Sacred and Adorable Heart and be wrapped about for an instant, by the flames of His love and we shall see, what a God who loves us, can do.
O my God, who shall be able to comprehend?”

St John Vianney (1786-1859)

what does jesus christ do in the eucharist - st john vianney - sun reflection 10 march 2019

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 17 February “As many as touched him were healed”

Sunday Reflection – 17 February -“As many as touched him were healed”-Mark 6:56

Saint Cyril of Alexandria (380-444)
Father & Doctor of the Church

Even for restoring the dead to life the Saviour did not stop at acting by word alone, though it was the bearer of divine commands.   For such a surpassing work He took his own flesh as His assistant – if one might put it that way – that He might show, that it has the power to give life and that He might cause it to be seen, that it is entirely one with Him.   For it is indeed His very own flesh and not an alien body.

This is what happened when He restored life to the synagogue leader’s daughter, saying to her:  “My child, arise!” (Mk 5:41).   He took her by the hand, as it is written.   As God, He gave her back her life by His all-powerful command and animated her also by contact with His holy flesh.   Thus, He bore witness that, in flesh as in His word, one and the same divine energy was at work.   In the same way, too, when He came to a town called Nain where the widow’s only son was being buried, He touched the coffin, saying: “Young man, I tell you, arise!” (Lk 7:14).

Thus He not only conferred to His word, the power to raise the dead but He even touched the dead, to show that His body is life-giving and, through His flesh, He caused life to pass into their corpses.   If the touch alone of His sacred flesh, restores life to a corrupting body, what profit shall we not discover, in His life-giving Eucharist, when we make of it our food?   It will wholly transform into its own property, which is immortality, those who participate in it.

Commentary on the Gospel of John, ch. 4if the touch alone of his sacred flesh - sty cyril of alexandria 17 feb 2019 sun reflection.jpg

Posted in SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, VATICAN Documents

Sunday Reflection – 10 February – On the use of this admirable Sacrament

Sunday Reflection – 10 February – Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent
Session the Thirteenth

Being the third under the Sovereign Pontiff Julius III., celebrated on the eleventh day of October, 1551.

CONCERNING THE MOST HOLY SACRAMENT OF THE EUCHARIST
Chapter VIII

On the use of this admirable Sacrament

…Finally this holy Synod with true fatherly affection admonishes, exhorts, begs and beseeches, through the bowels of the mercy of our God, that all and each of those who bear the Christian name would now at length agree and be of one mind in this sign of unity, in this bond of charity, in this symbol of concord and that, mindful of the so great majesty and the so exceeding love of our Lord Jesus Christ, who gave His own beloved soul as the price of our salvation and gave us His own flesh to eat, they would believe and venerate these sacred mysteries of His body and blood with such constancy and firmness of faith, with such devotion of soul, with such piety and worship as to be able frequently to receive that supersubstantial bread and that it may be to them truly the life of the soul and the perpetual health of their mind, that being invigorated by the strength thereof, they may, after the journeying of this miserable pilgrimage, be able to arrive at their heavenly country, there to eat, without any veil, that same bread of angels which they now eat under the sacred veils.the so exceeding love - council of trent - sun refl 10 feb 2019 sun 5C

Posted in CONFESSION/PENANCE, DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, Uncategorized

Sunday Reflection – 3 February – “May we be Worthy” – St Cyprian of Carthage

Sunday Reflection – 3 February – Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

“May we be Worthy”

“He [Paul] threatens, moreover, the stubborn and forward and denounces them, saying, ‘Whosoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord unworthily, is guilty of the body and blood of the Lord’ [1 Cor. 11:27].

All these warnings being scorned and contemned—[lapsed Christians will often take Communion] before their sin is expiated, before confession has been made of their crime, before their conscience has been purged by sacrifice and by the hand of the priest, before the offence of an angry and threatening Lord has been appeased, [and so] violence is done to His body and blood and they sin now, against their Lord, more with their hand and mouth than when they denied their Lord”

St Cyprian of Carthage (c 200- c 258) Bishop and Martyr, Father of the Church
(The Lapsed 15–16 [written in 251])lapsed christians - st cyprian of carthage - 3 feb 2019 sun reflec.jpg

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 13 January – Above all, let us pray Him to draw us to Him and to give us faith.

Sunday Reflection – 13 January – Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Above all, let us pray Him to draw us to Him and to give us faith.

Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890)
(Parochial & Plain Sermons, Vol. VI, no. 11)

“Above all, let us pray Him to draw us to Him and to give us faith.   When we feel that His mysteries are too severe for us and occasion us to doubt, let us earnestly wait on Him for the gift of humility and love.   Those who love and who are humble will apprehend them, carnal minds do not seek the and proud minds are offended at them but while love desires them, humility sustains them.

Let us pray Him to give us an earnest longing after Him – a thirst for His presence – an anxiety to find Him – a joy on hearing that He is to be found, even now, under the veil of sensible things – and a good hope that we shall find Him there.

Blessed indeed are they who have not seen and yet have believed.   They have their reward in believing, they enjoy the contemplation of a mysterious blessing, which does not even enter into the thoughts of other men and while they are more blessed than others, in the gift vouchsafed to them, they have the additional privilege of knowing that they are vouchsafed it.”let us pray him to give us - bl john henry newman 13 jan 2019.jpg

Posted in MORNING Prayers, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, THE EPIPHANY of the LORD, The HOLY EUCHARIST, THOMAS a KEMPIS

Sunday Reflection – 6 January – The Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord

Sunday Reflection – 6 January – The Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord

“What other people are so fortunate as the Christian people?   What creature under heaven is so beloved as a devout soul into whom God comes, in order to feed him with His own glorious Body and Blood?   O grace unspeakable, O marvellous condescension, O love without measure, bestowed only on human beings!

There is nothing I can give to the Lord for this grace – this supreme love;  nothing acceptable I can offer Him but my heart entirely given to God and closely united to Him. Then, all that is within me will be filled with joy, when my soul is perfectly one with God.

Then He will say to me:  “If you will be with Me, I will be with you.”  And I will answer Him and say: “Stay with me, Lord, I implore You, for my desire is to be with You.”

This is my whole desire – that my heart be united to You.”

Thomas à Kempis (1380-1471)

Book 4-Chapter 13 #3
Blessed Sacramentwhat other people are so fortunate - thomas a kempis - sun reflec 6 jan 2019.jpg

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on the FAMILY, St Pope JOHN PAUL, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 30 December – The family is called to become a daily offertory

Sunday Reflection – 30 December – Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph

“Actually, the experience of the family is called to become a daily offertory, as a holy offering to God, a gift of pleasing fragrance.
The Gospel of the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple, suggests us this same idea.
Jesus, the light of the world but also “a sign that will be contradicted” (Lk 2:32.34), desires to receive this offering of each family as He receives the bread and wine in the Eucharist.
He wants to join to the bread and wine destined to transubstantiation,
these human hopes and joys but also the inevitable sufferings and preoccupations of each family,
by incorporating them to the mystery of His Body and his Blood.
He then in turn gives them back – the same Body and Blood – in the communion,
as a source of spiritual energy,
not only for each single person but also for each family.”

St Pope John Paul (1920-2005)the experience of the family - st pope john paul 30 dec 2018

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES - J R R Tolkien and MORE, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, The INCARNATION

Sunday Reflection – 23 December – The Eucharistic Humility of God (Excerpt)

Sunday Reflection – 23 December – The Fourth Sunday of Advent – The Eucharistic Humility of God (Excerpt)

Because humility belongs to God alone
who made it His own in the mystery of the Incarnation,
and who continues to make it His own
so often as the mystic words are uttered by a priest
over a little bread and a little wine mixed with water:
“This is My Body. This is the chalice of My Blood.”
Here is the Mysterium Fidei:
the Eucharistic Humility of God.
Eat the Body of Christ and digest the Divine Humility.
Drink the Blood of Christ;
it is the elixir of those who would hide themselves with Christ in God.
Since the event of the Incarnation
–the descent of God into the Virgin’s womb,
in view of His descent into death’s dark tomb–
and so often as Holy Mass is celebrated
–the descent of God into the frail appearance of Bread
and into the taste and fragrance and wetness
of a few drops of wine–
humility can be found nowhere else.
The very least and last of the guests
has become The Host,
and The Host
has made Himself the very least and last of the guests.
Tremble, then, to adore Him,
and having adored Him, receive Him,
that your soul may become the throne of the Humble Hidden God
and His humility your most cherished treasure.
“Learn from Me,” He says,
“for I am meek and humble of heart” (Matthew 11:29),
and again,
“Everyone that exalts himself shall be humbled,
and he that humbles himself shall be exalted” (Luke 14:11).

Fr ‘Dom’ Marktremble then to adore him - fr dom mark vultus christi 23 dec 2018 sun reflection

Posted in ADVENT, BREVIARY Prayers, CATHOLIC-PRAYERS OF THE CHURCH, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, PRAYERS of the CHURCH, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The WORD

Sunday Reflections – Gaudete Sunday

Sunday Reflections – Gaudete Sunday – The Third Sunday of Advent – 16 December 2018gaudete-sunday

What is special about the Third Sunday of Advent?   For much of the Church’s history, this Sunday had a special name:  “Gaudete” Sunday.   The traditions surrounding this Sunday go back as far as the fourth or fifth century, as does the season of Advent itself. Advent, our preparation for Christmas, was originally a forty-day penitential season like Lent.   In fact, since it used to begin on 12 November (just after the Memorial of St. Martin of Tours), it was called “St Martin’s Lent.”   “Gaudete Sunday” was the Advent counterpart to “Laetare Sunday,” which marks the mid-point in Lent.

On Gaudete Sunday, the season of Advent shifts its focus.   For the first two weeks of Advent, the focus can be summed up in the phrase, “The Lord is coming.”   But beginning with Gaudete Sunday, the summary might be, “The Lord is near.”   This shift is marked by a lighter mood and a heightened sense of joyous anticipation.

Liturgically, the colours lighten as well.   The priest usually wears rose-coloured vestments, a hue seen only on Gaudete Sunday and Laetare Sunday.   On this day, we light the third candle of the Advent wreath, which is also rose-coloured, or if you prefer, pink.
The word “Gaudete” is Latin for “Rejoice.”   This celebration is a reminder that God who loves us is still in charge and that we await His coming not with fear but with  tremendous joy.   Today’s Second Reading, from the Letter of St Paul to the Ephesians, reflects this joy:  “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice.  Let all men know your forbearance. The Lord is at hand.  Have no anxiety about anything but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.  And the peace of God, which passes all understanding, will keep your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”

THE “O ANTIPHONS” OF ADVENT

The one exception to the audio barrage of so-called ‘Christmas Hymns’ we hear during Advent, is the simple chant “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.”   This song, with its longing for the coming of the Saviour, genuinely belongs to Advent and not to Christmas.
Its melody is based on Gregorian chant and its verses are all taken from the Church’s “O antiphons.” These antiphons introduce the Magnificat, or Canticle of Mary, in the Evening Prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours from 17 December through 23 December.
Each antiphon begins with a traditional title for Christ.

They are: “O Wisdom,” “O Leader of the House of Israel
[Adonai],” “O Root of Jesse’s Stem,” “O Key of David,” “O Radiant Dawn,” “O King of all the nations,” and finally, “O Emmanuel” which means “God with us.”    Each of these traditional titles for the Messiah connects the coming of Christ with the prophetic writings of the Old Testament.stained_glass_o_antiphons.jpg

On the last days of Advent, you may wish to add these “O Antiphons” to your
evening prayer, your prayer at table, or your bedtime prayer.

17 DECEMBER
O Wisdom of our God Most High,
guiding creation with power and love:
come to teach us the path of knowledge!
18 DECEMBER
O Leader of the House of Israel,
giver of the Law to Moses on Sinai:
come to rescue us with your mighty power!
19 DECEMBER
O Root of Jesse’s stem,
sign of God’s love for all his people:
come to save us without delay!
20 DECEMBER
O Key of David,
opening the gates of God’s eternal Kingdom:
come and free the prisoners of darkness!
21 DECEMBER
O Radiant Dawn,
splendour of eternal light, sun of justice:
come and shine on those who dwell in darkness and in the shadow of death.
22 DECEMBER
O King of all nations and keystone of the Church:
come and save man, whom you formed from the dust!
23 DECEMBER
O Emmanuel, our King and Giver of Law:
come to save us, Lord our God!

the o antiphons

Posted in ENCYCLICALS, PAPAL ENCYLICALS, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 9 December – The Second Sunday of Advent

Sunday Reflection – 9 December – The Second Sunday of Advent

Pope Pius XII and Mediator Dei

The question remains, then, of just how one participates actively “in the most holy mysteries and in the public and solemn prayer of the Church”.   Pope Pius XII situates active participation in a personal and corporate adhesion to the sacrifice of Christ who, in every Holy Mass, exercises His priesthood and offers Himself as a spotless victim to the Father.

One comes to Holy Mass, then, not after the manner of a consumer looking seeking spiritual gratification but, rather, as an offerer bearing to the altar the oblation of his own life, as a royal priest set over all created things in order to raise them heavenward in the Great Thanksgiving (Eucharist) and as a victim, a sacrificial lamb ready to be made over to God in Christ.  In Christ and in the members of His Mystical Body are the prophetic words of Abraham to Isaac wondrously fulfilled:  “God Himself will provide the lamb” (Genesis 22:8). Pope Pius XII writes:

“All the elements of the liturgy, then, would have us reproduce in our hearts the likeness of the divine Redeemer through the mystery of the cross, according to the words of the Apostle of the Gentiles, “With Christ I am nailed to the cross. I live, now not I, but Christ liveth in me.”   Thus we become a victim, as it were, along with Christ to increase the glory of the eternal Father.

Let the faithful, therefore, consider to what a high dignity they are raised by the sacrament of baptism.   They should not think it enough to participate in the eucharistic sacrifice with that general intention which befits members of Christ and children of the Church but let them further, in keeping with the spirit of the sacred liturgy, be most closely united with the High Priest and His earthly minister, at the time the consecration of the divine Victim is enacted and, at that time, especially when those solemn words are pronounced:

“By Him and with Him and in Him is to Thee, God the Father almighty, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, all honour and glory forever and ever”;   to these words in fact the people answer, “Amen.”

Nor should Christians forget to offer themselves, their cares, their sorrows, their distress and their necessities in union with their divine Saviour upon the cross.”

ven pope pius XII mediator dei - sunreflection 9 dec 2018

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, The WORD

Sunday Reflection – 2 December – “The Eucharistic Face of Christ”

Sunday Reflection – 2 December – First Sunday of Advent

The Eucharistic Face of Christ

In the Cenacle, together with Our Blessed Lady and the Apostles, one contemplates the Eucharistic Face of Christ.   The commandment of the Lord on the night before He suffered, “Do this in commemoration of me” (Lk 22:19), was certainly obeyed by the Apostles during the days that separated the Ascension of the Lord from Pentecost. The Mother of the Eucharist was there.   The very Face that disappeared into the heavens over the Mount of Olives on the day of the Ascension re-appears in every Holy Mass, hidden and yet shining, through the sacramental veils.

The Priestly Prayer of Christ to the Father, first uttered in the Cenacle on the night before He suffered, is wondrously actualised in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.   It is Christ, the Eternal High Priest, who stands at the altar with His Face turned toward the Father and His pierced Heart open for all eternity, that out of it we may receive the life-giving torrent that is the Gift of the Holy Spirit.   In some way, the final chapters of Saint John’s Gospel are a sustained contemplation of the Face of Jesus turned toward us and lifted to the Father.
Contemplate the Face of Jesus, portrayed in the Fourth Gospel, the Holy Spirit will surely draw you into His filial and priestly prayer to the Father. One who receives the Body and Blood of Christ, receives the very prayer of Christ into his soul.   The grace of every Holy Communion is that of Christ praying to His Father in us and for us.

Through the adorable mystery of the Eucharist, the Face we so long to contemplate, is set before our eyes and burned into our souls.   “It is given to us, all alike, to catch the glory of the Lord as in a mirror, with faces unveiled;  and so we become transfigured into the same likeness, borrowing glory from that glory, as the Spirit of the Lord enables us” (2 Cor 3:18). – (Fr) Dom Mark (vultusstblogs)through the adorable mystery of the eucharist - dom mark vultus christi - sun reflection 2 dec 2018

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, THOMAS a KEMPIS

Sunday Reflection – 25 November – The Solemnity of Christ the King

Sunday Reflection – 25 November – The Solemnity of Christ the King

Thomas à Kempis (1380-1471)

On the Blessed Sacrament, Book 4, Chapter 1:9-13

Many people travel far to honour the relics of the saints, marvelling at their wonderful deeds and at the building of magnificent shrines.   They gaze upon and kiss the sacred relics encased in silk and gold and behold, You are here present before me on the altar, my God, Saint of saints, Creator of men, and Lord of angels!
Often in looking at such things, men are moved by curiosity, by the novelty of the unseen and they bear away little fruit for the amendment of their lives, especially when they go from place to place lightly and without true contrition.   But here, in the Sacrament of the  altar, You are wholly present, my God, the man Christ Jesus, whence is obtained the full realisation of eternal salvation, as often as You are worthily and devoutly received.  To this, indeed, we are not drawn by levity, or curiosity, or sensuality but by firm faith,  devout hope, and sincere love.
O God, hidden Creator of the world, how wonderfully You deal with us!   How sweetly and graciously You dispose of things with Your elect to whom You offer Yourself to be received in this Sacrament!   This, indeed, surpasses all understanding.   This in a special manner attracts the hearts of the devout and inflames their love.   Your truly faithful servants, who give their whole life to amendment, often receive in Holy Communion the great grace of devotion and love of virtue.
Oh, the wonderful and hidden grace of this Sacrament which only the faithful of Christ
understand, which unbelievers and slaves of sin cannot experience!   In it spiritual grace is conferred, lost virtue restored and the beauty, marred by sin, repaired.   At times, indeed, its grace is so great that, from the fullness of the devotion, not only the mind but also the frail body feels filled with greater strength.
Nevertheless, our neglect and coldness is much to be deplored and pitied, when we are not moved to receive with greater fervour Christ in Whom is the hope and merit of all who will be saved.   He is our sanctification and redemption.   He is our consolation in this life and the eternal joy of the blessed in heaven.   This being true, it is lamentable that many pay so little heed to the salutary Mystery which fills the heavens with joy and maintains the whole universe in being.
Oh, the blindness and the hardness of the heart of man that does not show more regard for so wonderful a gift but rather falls into carelessness from its daily use!   If this most holy Sacrament were celebrated in only one place and consecrated by only one priest in the whole world, with what great desire, do you think, would men be attracted to that place, to that priest of God, in order to witness the celebration of the divine Mysteries! But now there are many priests and Mass is offered in many places, that God’s grace and love for men may appear the more clearly as the Sacred Communion is spread more widely through the world.

Thanks be to You, Jesus, everlasting Good Shepherd, Who have seen fit to feed us poor
exiled people with Your precious Body and Blood and to invite us with words from Your
own lips to partake of these sacred Mysteries:   

“Come to Me, all you who labour and are burdened and I will refresh you.”come to me, all you who labour - jesus in the blessed sacrament, holy mass - sun reflection 24 nov 2018 thomas a kempis bk 4 ch1

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, REDEMPTORISTS CSSR, SACRED and IMMACULATE HEARTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 18 November – Reparation for outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament – St Alphonsus Liguori

Sunday Reflection – 18 November

Reparation for outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament

 St Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787) Doctor of the Church

Meditate the following text written by Saint Alphonsus Maria and translated by Norman J. Muckermann, CSsR.    It is astonishingly relevant to the need for reparation, when one considers the current proliferation of so many outrages against the Most Blessed Sacrament.

The Sorrowful Heart of Jesus
It is impossible for us to appreciate how greatly afflicted the Heart of Jesus was for love of us and at the same time not be filled with pity for Him. . . . The principal sorrow affecting the Heart of Jesus was not so much knowing the torments and insults His enemies were preparing for Him.   Rather, it was seeing how ready we would be to reject His immense love.

Desecrations of the Sacred Host
Jesus distinctly saw all the sins which we would commit even after His sufferings, even after His bitter and ignominious death on the cross.   He foresaw, too, the insults which sinners would offer His Sacred Heart which He would leave on earth in the Most Holy Sacrament as proof of His love.   These insults are almost too horrible to mention:  people trampling the sacred hosts underfoot, throwing them into gutters or piles of refuse and even using them to worship the devil himself!

The Pledge of His Love
Even the knowledge that these and other defamations would happen did not prevent Jesus from giving us this great pledge of His love, the Holy Eucharist.   Jesus has an infinite hatred for sin, yet it seems that His great love for us even overcomes this bitterness.   Because of His love, He allows these sacrileges to happen in order not to deprive us of this Divine Food.   Should not this alone suffice to make us love a Heart that has loved us so much?

Jesus Forsaken on the Altar
What more could Jesus do to deserve our love?   Is our ingratitude so great that we will still leave Jesus forsaken on the altar, as so many are wont to do?   Rather, should we not unite ourselves to those few who gather to praise Him and acknowledge His divine presence?   Should we not melt with love, as do the candles which adorn the altars where the Holy Sacrament is preserved?   There the Sacred Heart remains burning with love for us.   Shall we not in turn burn with love for Jesus?”should we not melt with love - st alphonsus -18 nov 2018 sunday reflection

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 4 November – “I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.” – St Bernard

Sunday Reflection – 4 November – Thirty First Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

 “I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.”  St Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153) Doctor of the Church

Saint Bernard teaches, that it is not enough for us to take and eat the Bread from Heaven. We must also offer ourselves to be eaten.   Holy Communion is a wondrous exchange in which we become the bread of Christ.   Listen to Saint Bernard:

“My penitence, my salvation are His food.
I myself am His food.
I am chewed as I am reproved by Him;
I am swallowed by Him as I am taught;
I am digested by Him as I am changed;
I am assimilated as I am transformed;
I am made one with Him, as I am conformed to Him.
He feeds upon us and is fed by us
that we may be the more loosely bound to Him.”

Saint Bernard, ever the poet, uses images of eating and assimilation to describe how Christ unites us to Himself.   Our Lord becomes our food that we might become His.   We need the language of poets and preachers in our approach to the Eucharist.i am made one with him as i am conformed to him - st bernard - 4 nov 2018 sun reflection

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, FATHERS of the Church, PAPAL HOMILIES, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 28 October – Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 28 October – Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Recognise in the bread, that same body that hung on the cross 
and in the chalice, that same blood that gushed from His side.

Saint Augustine (354-430)

Transubstantiation
In the offering that Jesus makes of Himself we find all the novelty of Christian worship. In ancient times men offered in sacrifice to the divinity the animals or first fruits of the earth.   Jesus, instead, offers Himself, His body and His whole existence – He Himself, in person, becomes the sacrifice that the liturgy offers in the Holy Mass.
In fact, with the consecration of the bread and wine they become His true body and blood.
Saint Augustine invited his faithful, not to pause on what appeared to their sight but to go beyond:  “Recognise in the bread — he said — that same body that hung on the cross and in the chalice that same blood that gushed from His side” (Disc. 228 B, 2).
To explain this transformation, theology has coined the word “transubstantiation,” a word that resounded for the first time in this Basilica during the IV Lateran Council, of which in five years will be the 8th centenary.   On that occasion the following expressions were inserted in the profession of faith:  “his body and his blood are truly contained in the sacrament of the altar, under the species of bread and wine, because the bread is transubstantiated into the body and the wine into the blood by divine power” (DS, 802).
Therefore, it is essential to stress, in the itineraries of education of children in the faith, of adolescents and of young people, as well as in “centres of listening” to the Word of God, that in the sacrament of the Eucharist, Christ is truly, really and substantially present.recognise in the bread - st augustine - 28 oct 2018

Sunday
And let us also keep present that the Eucharist, joined to the cross and resurrection of the Lord, has dictated a new structure to our time.

The Risen One was manifested the day after Saturday, the first day of the week, day of the sun and of creation.   From the beginning, Christians have celebrated their encounter with the Risen One, the Eucharist, on this first day, on this new day of the true sun of history, the Risen Christ.

And thus time always begins again with the encounter with the Risen One and this encounter gives content and strength to everyday life.   Because of this, it is very important for us Christians, to follow this new rhythm of time, to meet with the Risen One on Sunday and thus “to take” with us His presence, which transforms us and transforms our time.

Pope Benedict XVI – 17 June 2010from the beginning, Christians have celebrated - pope benedict - 28 oct 2018

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL HOMILIES, PRACTISING CATHOLIC, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 7 October – Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 7 October – Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

The Beating Heart of the Church –

the Eucharistic Heart of Christ.

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said on 10 June 2007:

“Today’s solemnity of Corpus Christi, which was celebrated last Thursday in the Vatican and in other countries, invites us to contemplate the supreme Mystery of our faith – the Most Holy Eucharist, the Real Presence of our Lord Jesus Christ in the Sacrament of the altar.   Every time that the priest renews the Eucharistic Sacrifice, in the prayer of consecration he repeats:  ‘This is my Body…this is my Blood.’   He lends his voice, his hands and his heart to Christ, who wanted to remain with us in order to be the beating Heart of the Church.

But even after the Celebration of the Divine Mysteries the Lord Jesus remains present in the tabernacle.   For this reason, praise is rendered to Him especially through Eucharistic Adoration, as I sought to remind everyone in the recent Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis (see nos. 66-69) following the Synod on this topic.   In fact, there is an intrinsic connection between celebration and adoration.   The Holy Mass is in itself already the greatest act of adoration on the part of the Church.   ‘No one eats this flesh,’ St Augustine wrote, ‘unless he has first adored it’ (Com. on Psalms 98,9; CCL XXXIX, 1385).  Adoration, apart from the Holy Mas, prolongs and intensifies what has taken place in the liturgical celebration and makes it possible, to receive Christ in a real and profound way.”adoration, apart from the holy mass - pope benedict - 7 oct 2018

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, Uncategorized

Sunday Reflection – 30 September – Twenty sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 30 September – Twenty sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

It is remarkable how it was the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in Catholic churches that more than anything else impressed and moved Blessed John Henry Newman, even more than the Mass itself.

And so it was that the feature of his new religious life as a Catholic that most struck him came as a complete surprise – namely, the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament in Catholic churches.   He wrote in a letter to a close friend, herself about to become a Catholic a few months later:

“We went over not realising those privileges which we have found by going.   I never allowed my mind to dwell on what I might gain of blessedness – but certainly, if I had thought much upon it, I could not have fancied the extreme, ineffable comfort of being in the same house with Him who cured the sick and taught His disciples …

When I have been in Churches abroad, I have religiously abstained from acts of worship, though it was a most soothing comfort to go into them – nor did I know what was going on;  I neither understood nor tried to understand the Mass service – and I did not know, or did not observe, the tabernacle Lamp – but now after tasting of the awful delight of worshipping God in His Temple, how unspeakably cold is the idea of a Temple without that Divine Presence! One is tempted to say what is the meaning, what is the use of it?”

“It is really most wonderful to see this Divine Presence looking out almost into the open streets from the various Churches … I never knew what worship was, as an objective fact, till I entered the Catholic Church.”

“It is such an incomprehensible blessing to have Christ in bodily presence in one’s house, within one’s walls, as swallows up all other privileges …”

i never knew what worship was - bl jh newman - 30 sept 2018 - sunday reflection

Posted in DOCTORS of the Church, EUCHARISTIC Adoration, FATHERS of the Church, MORNING Prayers, PAPAL MESSAGES, QUOTES of the SAINTS, QUOTES on PRAYER, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 16 September – Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 16 September – Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Excerpt from a Letter of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI,
given on the Occasion of the 16th Centenary
of the Death of St John Chrysostom “Doctor of the Eucharist”

For Chrysostom, the ecclesial unity that is brought about in Christ is attested to in a quite special way in the Eucharist. “Called “Doctor of the Eucharist’ because of the vastness and depth of his teaching on the Most Holy Sacrament”, he taught that the sacramental unity of the Eucharist constitutes the basis of ecclesial unity in and for Christ.   “Of course, there are many things to keep us united. A table is prepared before all… all are offered the same drink, or, rather, not only the same drink but also the same cup. Our Father, desiring to lead us to tender affection, has also disposed this – that we drink from one cup, something that is befitting to an intense love”.   Reflecting on the words of St Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, “The bread which we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?”, John commented,for the Apostle, therefore, “just as that body is united to Christ, so we are united to Him through this bread”.   And even more clearly, in the light of the Apostle’s subsequent words:  “Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body”, John argued:  “What is bread?   The Body of Christ  . And what does it become when we eat it?   The Body of Christ – not many bodies but one body.   Just as bread becomes one loaf although it is made of numerous grains of wheat…, so we too are united both with one another and with Christ…. Now, if we are nourished by the same loaf and all become the same thing, why do we not also show the same love, so as to become one in this dimension, too?”.

Chrysostom’s faith in the mystery of love that binds believers to Christ and to one another led him to experience profound veneration for the Eucharist, a veneration which he nourished in particular in the celebration of the Divine Liturgy.   Indeed, one of the richest forms of the Eastern Liturgy bears his name:  “The Divine Liturgy of St John Chrysostom”.   John understood that the Divine Liturgy places the believer spiritually between earthly life and the heavenly realities that have been promised by the Lord.   He told Basil the Great of the reverential awe he felt in celebrating the sacred mysteries with these words:   “When you see the immolated Lord lying on the altar and the priest who, standing, prays over the victim… can you still believe you are among men, that you are on earth? Are you not, on the contrary, suddenly transported to Heaven?”   The sacred rites, John said, “are not only marvellous to see but extraordinary because of the reverential awe they inspire. The priest who brings down the Holy Spirit stands there… he prays at length that the grace which descends on the sacrifice may illuminate the minds of all in that place and make them brighter than silver purified in the crucible. Who can spurn this venerable mystery?”.when you see the immolated lord - st john chrysostom - sunday reflection - 16 sept 2018 24th ord time year b

With great depth, Chrysostom developed his reflection on the effect of sacramental Communion in believers:  “The Blood of Christ renews in us the image of our King, it produces an indescribable beauty and does not allow the nobility of our souls to be destroyed but ceaselessly waters and nourishes them”.   For this reason, John often and insistently urged the faithful to approach the Lord’s altar in a dignified manner, “not with levity… not by habit or with formality”, but with “sincerity and purity of spirit”.   He tirelessly repeated that preparation for Holy Communion must include repentance for sins and gratitude for Christ’s sacrifice made for our salvation.   He therefore urged the faithful to participate fully and devoutly in the rites of the Divine Liturgy and to receive Holy Communion with these same dispositions:  “Do not permit us, we implore you, to be killed by your irreverence but approach Him with devotion and purity and, when you see Him placed before you, say to yourselves:  “By virtue of this Body I am no longer dust and ashes, I am no longer a prisoner but free, by virtue of this, I hope in Heaven and to receive its goods, the inheritance of the angels and to converse with Christ'”.by virtue of this body - st john chrysostom - 16 sept 2018

Of course, he also drew from contemplation of the Mystery the moral consequences in which he involved his listeners: he reminded them that communion with the Body and Blood of Christ obliged them to offer material help to the poor and the hungry who lived among them.   The Lord’s table is the place where believers recognise and welcome the poor and needy whom they may have previously ignored.   He urged the faithful of all times to look beyond the altar where the Eucharistic Sacrifice is offered and see Christ in the person of the poor, recalling that thanks to their assistance to the needy, they will be able to offer on Christ’s altar a sacrifice pleasing to God.”...Pope Benedict

He said:
“Lift up and stretch out your hands,
not to heaven but to the poor…
if you lift up your hands in prayer
without sharing with the poor,
it is worth nothing.”lift up and stretch out your hands, not to heaven but to the poor - st john chrysostom - 16 sept 2018

St John Chrysostom (347-407), Father and Doctor of the Eucharist, Pray for us!st john chrysostom pray for us.2

Posted in MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, St Pope JOHN PAUL, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST, The WORD

Sunday Reflection- 19 August – John 6:51-58

Sunday Reflection – 19 August – John 6:51-58

“My flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink”

The sacramental representation of Christ’s sacrifice, crowned by the resurrection, in the Mass involves a most special presence which – in the words of Paul VI – “is called ‘real’ not as a way of excluding all other types of presence as if they were ‘not real’, but because it is a presence in the fullest sense: a substantial presence whereby Christ, the God-Man, is wholly and entirely present”.   This sets forth once more, the perennially valid teaching, of the Council of Trent, “the consecration of the bread and wine effects the change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord, and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood.   And the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and properly called this change transubstantiation”.

Truly the Eucharist is a mysterium fidei, a mystery which surpasses our understanding and can only be received in faith, as is often brought out in the catechesis of the Church Fathers regarding this divine sacrament:  “Do not see – Saint Cyril of Jerusalem exhorts – in the bread and wine merely natural elements, because the Lord has expressly said that they are his body and his blood: faith assures you of this, though your senses suggest otherwise”.

Before this mystery of love, human reason fully experiences its limitations. One understands how, down the centuries, this truth has stimulated theology to strive to understand it ever more deeply.   These are praiseworthy efforts, which are all the more helpful and insightful to the extent that they are able to join critical thinking to the “living faith” of the Church…   There remains the boundary indicated by Paul VI: “Every theological explanation… must firmly maintain that in objective reality, independently of our mind, the bread and wine have ceased to exist after the consecration, so that the adorable body and blood of the Lord Jesus from that moment on are really before us under the sacramental species of bread and wine”.

St Pope John Paul (1920-2005)every theological explanation must firmly maintain - bl pope paul VI - 19 aug 2018.jpg

Posted in Blessed JOHN HENRY Cardinal NEWMAN, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY CROSS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 12 August – Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Sunday Reflection – 12 August – Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Jesus, our Daily Sacrifice

“Our Lord not only offered Himself as a Sacrifice on the Cross but He makes Himself a perpetual, a daily Sacrifice, to the end of time.

In the Holy Mass, that One Sacrifice on the Cross once offered is renewed, continued, applied to our benefit.
He seems to say, ‘My Cross was raised up 1800 years ago – and only for a few hours and very few of my servants were present there – but I intend to bring millions into my Church.   For their sakes then, I will perpetuate My Sacrifice, that each of them may be as though they had severally been present on Calvary.   I will offer Myself up, day by day to the Father, that everyone of my followers, may have the opportunity to offer his petitions to Him, sanctified and recommended by the all-meritorious virtue of My Passion.   Thus, I will be a Priest forever, after the order of Melchisedech – My priests shall stand at the Altar – but not they but I rather, will offer.   I will not let them offer mere bread and wine but I Myself, will be present upon the Altar instead and I will offer up Myself invisibly, while they perform the outward rite.’

And thus, the Lamb that was slain once for all, though He is ascended on high, ever remains a victim from His miraculous presence in Holy Mass under the figure and appearance of mere earthly and visible symbols.”

Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890)
Jesus, our Daily Sacrifice, Prayers, Verses and Devotionsand thus, the lambe that was slain - bl j h newman - 12 aug 2018 - sunday reflection

Posted in EUCHARISTIC Adoration, MORNING Prayers, QUOTES of the SAINTS, SUNDAY REFLECTIONS, The HOLY EUCHARIST

Sunday Reflection – 15 July – Fifteenth Sunday of the Year

Sunday Reflection – 15 July – Fifteenth Sunday of the Year

“….in the Blessed Sacrament Our Lord Himself is the light which manifests Him as our model and reveals His beauties to us.   He is Himself His light, His means of being known, just as the sun is itself its own proof.   To make Himself known, He has only to show Himself.   Recognition of Him need not come from its being reasoned out.

A child does not have to discourse with himself to recognise his parents.   Our Lord reveals Himself through His presence, just as parents do.   But as we grow to know His voice better and as our hearts become more sympathetic to Him in emptying themselves of what is not Him, our Lord manifests Himself in a clearer and more intimate manner, which only those know, who love Him.   He gives the soul a divine conviction which overshadows the light of human reason.

Look at Magdalene:  one word from Jesus and she recognises Him.   He acts in the same way in the Blessed Sacrament:   He says one word only but it rings in our very hearts:  “It is I!….”   We sense His Presence, we believe in it more firmly than if we were to see Him with bodily eyes.”

St Peter Julian Eymard (1811-1868)it is I - st peter julian eymard - 15 july 2018